Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Summary 05.Glass

Summary 05.Glass

Ratings: (0)|Views: 92 |Likes:

More info:

Published by: National Education Policy Center on Aug 18, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

08/18/2013

pdf

text

original

 
 
E
DUCATION
 P
OLICY
 S
TUDIES
 L
ABORATORY
Education Policy Research Unit
EPSL
 
|
 
S
CHOOL
EFORM
P
ROPOSALS
: T
HE
ESEARCH
E
VIDENCE
 
G
ROUPING
S
TUDENTS FOR 
I
NSTRUCTION
 
B
Y
G
ENE
V G
LASS
 
A
RIZONA
S
TATE
U
 NIVERSITY
 
 Research Quality
Research on grouping varies tremendously based on the discipline and background of researchers. Researchers who belong to ethnic minorities are far more critical of abilitygrouping than are researchers from white, middle-class backgrounds. Research on groupingfalls into two disciplinary categories: one produced by educational psychologists, wholargely rely on testing to establish the effects of grouping on individual achievement; theother produced by sociologists, who rely on interviews and observation, and who address broader questions about opportunities, preconceptions, and the impact tracking has had onsociety at large.Psychologists have tended to focus on short-run comparisons of different ability groupsexposed to the same curriculum. Sociologists have taken a broader view of the variouseffects that ensue from the separation of students into homogeneous groups: the curriculumthey receive, the type of instruction they are given, the social climate that is created and howit might shape their long-range plans, and the like.
 Research Findings
 History:
Sorting students into homogeneous ability and achievement groups dates to the 19
th
 century and includes practices ranging from limited grouping of pupils by reading levelduring reading instruction periods to more sweeping approaches, including tracking and evenschool-district segregation. Grouping has been traditionally seen as enabling teachers totailor instruction according to students’ differing abilities – faster pace and enriched materialfor bright students; remediation, repetition, and review for low-ability students.
Incidence:
Approval of grouping has declined in the last quarter of the 20
th
century, but the practice remains widespread (although not always labeled as such); one survey found up to90% of schools tracked students in mathematics instruction in grade 8. Reading grouping inelementary grades is nearly universal, and surveys may underestimate the incidence of grouping. Even open enrollment plans allowing students to elect courses of study have beenobserved to stratify students by ability groups. Support for grouping is high among teachers – 

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->