Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
11Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Alang Shipbreaking Yard

Alang Shipbreaking Yard

Ratings: (0)|Views: 5,688|Likes:
Published by Tarun Kanti Bose
Alang, the world's largest ship breaking yard at Bhavnagar district in Gujarat, where toxic ships from rich nations are sent for dismantling under the guise of recycling. Workers employed in the yard are exposed to asbestos and other poisons from the ships broken in unsound environmental conditions.
Alang, the world's largest ship breaking yard at Bhavnagar district in Gujarat, where toxic ships from rich nations are sent for dismantling under the guise of recycling. Workers employed in the yard are exposed to asbestos and other poisons from the ships broken in unsound environmental conditions.

More info:

Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Tarun Kanti Bose on Jun 07, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

01/08/2013

pdf

text

original

 
THE DEATH CHAMBER 
Alang provides us with tonnes of iron but gives only disease and death to its workers, writes 
TARUN K BOSE
lang, the world's largest ship breaking yard at Bhavnagar district in Gujarat,where toxic ships from rich nations are sent for dismantling under the guiseof recycling. Workers employed in the yard are exposed to asbestos andother poisons from the ships broken in unsound environmental conditions.Recently, 13 people died and many more injured. The deaths in Alang Shipyard andits frequent reporting in press highlight the problems of the shipyard. Manyquestions about the functioning of Alang Shipyard raised but are left out.
A
Ship owners sending their ships do not remove the hazardous material from theship prior to sending it for scrapping. In the world, there are about 45,000 ocean-going ships such as container ships, general cargo ships, roll on/roll-off ships,refrigerated cargo ships, tankers, ferries, cruise liners and special ships for researchor cable-lying. Warships are not counted. About 700 are taken out of service, afteran average service life of 29 years at sea. These ships are sent to Alang fordismantling.In the 1970s shipbreaking was still a highly mechanised industrial operation carried outin the berths of shipyards, mainly in Great Britain, Taiwan, Spain, Mexico and Brazil.Since the early 1980s shipbreaking has been increasingly shifted to poor Asiancountries. By 1993, half of the ocean-going ships were scrapped in China. At the newmillennium, 70 percent of the ships were dismantled in Alang and remaining 30percent were in Bangladesh, China, Vietnam and Philippines.
WORKERS IN ALANG SHIP BREAKING YARD
 
When a ship reaches Alang at the end of its sailing life as it is no longerprofitable, its classification certificate- the 4-year special survey-expires, and itis no longer able to meet safety requirements, it as a rule offered to brokers inHamburg (Germany), London or New York, who pass on to the business to India.One kind of business for the broker in Alang consists of attaining good price andanother lies in converting payments in the form of a non-convertible Indiancurrency into prices in US dollars. The dollar price per tonne of unladen weightsometimes reaches $ 170.The main purpose of dismantling ships is to recover the steel. 95 percent of themass of a defunct ocean- going ship consists of high quality steel. Remaining 5percent is made up of non-ferrous metal components, paints and coatings,insulation and sealing materials, electric cabling, cabin walls, decorativematerials, floor covering etc. These materials are firmly installed on the ship oreven inseparably bonded to the valuable iron, and need to be stripped,disposed of or at least taken into consideration in the process of breaking theship.
SHIPS FROM DIFFERENT COUNTRIES ARRIVE AT ALANG
 Numerous consumer items taken from the ships are sold in the shops that thriveon this trade along the access road to the scrapping area. Items sold arefurniture, crockery, washing machine, electronic gadgets, canoes, diesel engine,generator, motor, iron plates, valuable fittings, the asbestos-containingdecorative tiling, panels and insulating materials. As Alang is a rural region sothere is greater demand for consumer items sold by ship breakers' shop. Itemsare much cheaper than the market and there is much rush of buyers. Thosebuying consumer items do not think for while that behind the items purchased bythem there are thousands of human wailing's. As remarked by largest circulatedGerman magazine in its photo feature caption - ' On the altar of the Alang shipbreaking yard everyday human lives are sacrificed'
 
Scrapping old ships in Alang poison people and environment. Ships manuallydismantled here, workers come in contact with toxic substances. The pollutantscontaminate water, air and the soil. The contamination of ship parts by toxic andcarcinogenic substances, which have been banned in developed countries,reaches high levels in the older ships.
SHIP BREAKING YARD WITHOUT ANY SAFEGUARDS
In Alang ship breaking yard, asbestos is openly and carelessly handled without anykind of safeguards. Asbestos can be seen everywhere- be it on the ships, next tothe ships, on the beach, in big bowls on the heads of women workers and onuncontrolled dumps on the land behind. Asbestos-containing material is strippedfrom the ships in everyday clothing, without protective masks and with barehands, and subsequently picked apart with same disregard for safeguards.Workers in the Alang ship-breaking yard are mostly youths. Some of them are asyoung as 17 years, exposed to hazardous asbestos dust for a longer lifetime andare threatened not only by the acute dangers, but also to its medium and long-time hazards. Cancers caused by asbestos only emerge after decades. As Dr.Frank Hittmann, Occupational physician and industrial physician in Bremen,Germany says, “The incidence of cancer in Alang's working conditions is 25 percent. Every fourth worker in Alang must be expected to contract cancer."Approximately 100 ship breakers in Alang employ about 40,000 workers who livein make shift shanties directly next to the workplace on the 184 plots into whichthe beach is organised. The makeshift accommodation along the beach is onlyseparated from the scrapping yards by the main road running along the beach.Due to constant inflow of material from the ships that are broken daily, asbestosdust is omnipresent both at the workplace and where the workers sleep. Theheavy traffic on the road whirls up the dust, which then settles on the tables andchairs on the roadside where the workers spend their leisure time. Many of theworkers sleep on the floor or very close it. The shanties are open, and it can beassumed that the composition of dust on the road and in house scarcely differs.

Activity (11)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
Rajendra Pathak liked this
Mythili Madapati liked this
Hrudanand Mishra liked this
Abhilash S Kumar liked this
Hussein Captain liked this
Rishad Merchant liked this
Khan Abid liked this
NightIce liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->