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The People's Knowledge Handout-Solidarity Teach-In for Trayvon I

The People's Knowledge Handout-Solidarity Teach-In for Trayvon I

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Published by greencircleas
TEACH-IN I: THE PEOPLE’S KNOWLEDGE (Week of Aug. 18-24)
By Paula Ioanide & Felice Blake
solidarityteachins@gmail.com
This teach-in will focus on the long history of resistance to the function of lynching and police
murder in preserving white supremacy, placing Trayvon Martin’s killing within a larger context
of white impunity and privilege. We will examine people of color’s movements for justice and
the knowledge these mobilizations produced. From Ida B. Wells’s anti-lynching campaigns, to
mass mobilizations post-Emmett Till’s killing, to L.A. uprising post-Rodney King, our youth
need to know that there is a long history of resistance and rebellion to vigilante and state
violence.
TEACH-IN I: THE PEOPLE’S KNOWLEDGE (Week of Aug. 18-24)
By Paula Ioanide & Felice Blake
solidarityteachins@gmail.com
This teach-in will focus on the long history of resistance to the function of lynching and police
murder in preserving white supremacy, placing Trayvon Martin’s killing within a larger context
of white impunity and privilege. We will examine people of color’s movements for justice and
the knowledge these mobilizations produced. From Ida B. Wells’s anti-lynching campaigns, to
mass mobilizations post-Emmett Till’s killing, to L.A. uprising post-Rodney King, our youth
need to know that there is a long history of resistance and rebellion to vigilante and state
violence.

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Published by: greencircleas on Aug 21, 2013
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TEACH-IN I: THE PEOPLE’S KNOWLEDGE (Week of Aug. 18-24)
By Paula Ioanide & Felice Blakesolidarityteachins@gmail.comThis teach-in will focus on the long history of resistance to the function of lynching and policemurder in preserving white supremacy, placing Trayvon Martin’s killing within a larger contextof white impunity and privilege. We will examine people of color’s movements for justice andthe knowledge these mobilizations produced. From Ida B. Wells’s anti-lynching campaigns, tomass mobilizations post-Emmett Till’s killing, to L.A. uprising post-Rodney King, our youthneed to know that there is a long history of resistance and rebellion to vigilante and stateviolence.
Key Figures/Key Movements
Anti-lynching Campaigns (1890-1920s)-- Ida B. Wells, Frederick DouglassCivil Rights and the Fight against the Culture of Segregation -- Mamie Till (Emmett Till’smother), Medgar Evers, Fannie Lou Hamer, Robert F. Williams (Deacons for Defense andJustice)Black Power--Black Panther Party, Young Lords, Brown Berets, Third World Left1965 Watts Uprisings in response to police brutality of Marquette FryeEmergence of Copwatch in Berkeley, CA responding to police brutality1992 LA Uprisings in response to verdict acquitting police officers who brutalized Rodney KingVerdictAudre Lorde Project-Stopping violence against LGBTQ peoples in NYCINCITE! Women of Color Against Violence--working at the interface between state andcommunity based violence
Key Legislation
14th Amendment--equal protection under lawCivil Rights Act of 1964Dyer Bill--Anti-lynching legislation proposed but never passed (apology issued in 2005)
Media Sources
 A Passion for Justice: Ida B. WellsEyes on the PrizeBastards of the Party (2005)The Black Power Mixtape All Power to the People (1996)Palante Siempre Palante: The Young Lords Party The Fire This Time: Why Los Angeles Burned Who Killed Vincent Chin? (1987)
Further Readings
1
 
Antonia Castaneda, “Sexual Violence in the Politics and Policies of Conquest: AmerindianWoman and the Spanish Conquest of Alta California” in
Building with Our Hands
, eds. Adela dela Torre and Beatriz M. PesqueraIda B. Wells-Barnett,
On Lynchings
(with introduction by Patricia Hill Collins)Philip Dray,
 At the Hands of Persons Unknown
Elizabeth Grace Hale,
Making Whiteness: The Culture of Segregation in the South
 William Carrigan and Clive Webb, “The Lynching of Persons of Mexican Origin or Descent in theUnited States, 1848-1928”Jill Nelson, ed.,
Police Brutality: An Anthology 
Mike Davis,
City of Quartz
(“The Hammer and the Rock” chapter)Daneille McGuire, “It Was Like All of Us had been Raped: Sexual Violence, CommunityMobilization, and the African American Freedom Struggle” in
 Journal of American History 
Sylvanna Falcon, “National Security and the Violation of Women: Militarized Border Rape atthe US-Mexico Border” in
Color of Violence: the Incite Anthology 
Key Terms
Self-defenseSelf-determinationHistory of resistance and the freedom struggleSettler colonialismVigilantismSpectacle lynchingCulture of segregationMilitarizationWhitenessGender-specific racial violence
NOTES
IDA B. WELLS AND THE ANTI-LYNCHING MOVEMENTIda B. Wells (1862-1931) works to address entrenched poverty, political disenfranchisement,substandard housing, underfunded schools, poor health and other social problems affectingpeople one generation from slavery
Participates in founding Black Women’s Club Movement beginning in 1890s to focus on‘racial uplift’
Uses Black nationalist-inspired strategies for Black community development
Participates in Women’s Suffrage movement and NAACPFoundational principles used by Wells:2
 
Survival as form of resistance for African Americans grappling with aftermath of emancipation
Tradition of Black self-help, economic self-reliance, armed self-defenseHistorical neglect of Ida B. Wells until the 1980s reflects neglect of Black women’s historyCore themes of African American intellectual production
Describing black lives in ways that reflects their agency; reclamation of black humanityby resisting pathologizing narratives of people of African descent within mainstreamnarratives; refutes victimization
Challenge of distorted historical records, particularly myths of black hypersexuality andhyperviolence
Wells uses white historical record to reveal fallaciesPrescription of solutions to social problems uncovered by telling truth of black lives andchallenging distorted historical recordsChanging public sentiment through information (rational)Encouraging moral leadership in religious institutions (ethical)Climate of lawlessness “bad for business” (pragmatic/economic)Wells part of Black feminist tradition1.Struggle to control African American women’s bodies and sexuality is major part of race, gender, class relations in African Diaspora and U.S.2.Use of intersectional paradigms to explain social phenomena--mutually constitutivesystems of oppression (e.g. one’s race and gender affect a person’s vulnerability tooppression)3.Engages Black feminist epistemology (ways of knowing, understanding that come outof particular experience) by valorizing lived experience as a criterion of meaning
Uses facts from white newspapers to create ideological resistance that underminescommonly accepted practices—New York Age 1892 (Memphis paper – Free Speech)
Self-realization through narrative expressed from vantage point of black people
Questions of white femininity being impure raised as method to interrogate white women’sparticipation in terror of lynching by taking position of docile victims; [pg 29] – “Nobody inthis section of the country believes the old threadbare lie that Negro men rape whitewomen. If Southern white men are not careful, they will overreach themselves and publicsentiment will have a reaction; a conclusion will then be reached which will be verydamaging to the moral reputation of their women.”3

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