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Dr. Akizuki’s radiation diet - Health Condition and Diet: The Way to Health by Dr. Tatsuichiro Akizuki

Dr. Akizuki’s radiation diet - Health Condition and Diet: The Way to Health by Dr. Tatsuichiro Akizuki

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Published by Chaffee
Tatsuichiro Akizuki, M.D., director of St. Francis Hospital in Nagasaki, saved the lives of all of his surviving patients after the atomic bombing on August 9, 1945, by prescribing a special diet of miso soup, brown rice, seaweed, and root vegetables.

Though no one in Nagasaki knew the bomb was radioactive, Dr. Akizuki had worked as a radiotherapist and recognized that catarrh, a common symptom among bomb survivors, was frequently brought on by the continual irradiation of persons suffering from uterine or breast cancer. He found that giving the cancer patients a mildly saline solution to drink would improve their condition. He had also met George Ohsawa, the father of modern macrobiotics, in Tokyo and studied the healing power of food.

“I felt something like confidence welling up in my chest,” Dr. Akizuki recalls in his book Nagasaki 1945 (London, Quartet Books, 1981). “I gave the cooks and the staff strict orders that, when they made the unpolished-rice balls, they must add some salt to them, and to make salty, thick miso soup at every meal, and never use any sugar. When they failed to follow my instructions, I scolded them remorselessly, saying: ‘Don’t ever take any sugar, nothing sweet! It will destroy your blood!’”

Thanks to this dietary method, all the patients and staff survived while living in the lethal ashes of their ruined hospital. Their hair stopped falling out, and they didn’t have any more nausea or bloody excrement. “It was thanks to this food that all of us could work for people day after day, overcoming fatigue or symptoms of atomic disease and survive the disaster free from severe symptoms of radioactivity,” Dr. Akizuki explained.

The St. Francis Hospital was rebuilt, and for many years Dr. Akizuki served as director of the Nagasaki Association for Research into Hibakushas’ [atomic bomb survivors’] Problems. Over the years, he grew more religious but still attributed the miraculous survival to the diet. “We have a mission, to tell what happened here,” he wrote in his autobiography. “That is why we feel God gave us life, to live until now.”

As the Cold War progressed, the United States and the Soviet Union conducted widespread atmospheric nuclear testing, and food contamination became an international issue. Scientists at McGill University in Montreal began a series of experiments in the 1960s designed to identify a food or nutrient that could help counteract the effects of nuclear radiation and fallout. In a series of articles published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal, they reported that common sea vegetables such as kombu and kelp contain a substances, sodium alginate, that could reduce by 50 to 80 percent the amount of radioactive strontium absorbed through the digestive system.

By the late 1980s and early 1990s, Japanese researchers, influenced by Dr. Akizuki’s experience, weighed in on the quest. Kazumitsu Watanabe, professor of cancer and radiation at Hiroshima University’s atomic bomb radiation research center, reported that people who ate miso regularly tested up to five times more resistant to radiation than people not eating miso. Laboratory studies on mice further confirmed that miso specifically helped protect the small intestine from harm.

Meanwhile, in the Soviet Union, a series of nuclear accidents resulted in further use of dietary methods to neutralize radioactive particles. In 1990, as director of the Kushi Institute, a macrobiotic educational center in western Massachusetts, I organized an airlift of several thousand pounds of miso, sea vegetables, and other detoxifying foods to physicians in Chelyabinsk and Chernobyl.

The following guidelines are recommended to help protect against radioactivity from the current nuclear accidents in Japan:

more info: Diet to Help Protect Against Nuclear Radiation By Alex Jack | DiaNuke.org http://bit.ly/15bgQzg
Tatsuichiro Akizuki, M.D., director of St. Francis Hospital in Nagasaki, saved the lives of all of his surviving patients after the atomic bombing on August 9, 1945, by prescribing a special diet of miso soup, brown rice, seaweed, and root vegetables.

Though no one in Nagasaki knew the bomb was radioactive, Dr. Akizuki had worked as a radiotherapist and recognized that catarrh, a common symptom among bomb survivors, was frequently brought on by the continual irradiation of persons suffering from uterine or breast cancer. He found that giving the cancer patients a mildly saline solution to drink would improve their condition. He had also met George Ohsawa, the father of modern macrobiotics, in Tokyo and studied the healing power of food.

“I felt something like confidence welling up in my chest,” Dr. Akizuki recalls in his book Nagasaki 1945 (London, Quartet Books, 1981). “I gave the cooks and the staff strict orders that, when they made the unpolished-rice balls, they must add some salt to them, and to make salty, thick miso soup at every meal, and never use any sugar. When they failed to follow my instructions, I scolded them remorselessly, saying: ‘Don’t ever take any sugar, nothing sweet! It will destroy your blood!’”

Thanks to this dietary method, all the patients and staff survived while living in the lethal ashes of their ruined hospital. Their hair stopped falling out, and they didn’t have any more nausea or bloody excrement. “It was thanks to this food that all of us could work for people day after day, overcoming fatigue or symptoms of atomic disease and survive the disaster free from severe symptoms of radioactivity,” Dr. Akizuki explained.

The St. Francis Hospital was rebuilt, and for many years Dr. Akizuki served as director of the Nagasaki Association for Research into Hibakushas’ [atomic bomb survivors’] Problems. Over the years, he grew more religious but still attributed the miraculous survival to the diet. “We have a mission, to tell what happened here,” he wrote in his autobiography. “That is why we feel God gave us life, to live until now.”

As the Cold War progressed, the United States and the Soviet Union conducted widespread atmospheric nuclear testing, and food contamination became an international issue. Scientists at McGill University in Montreal began a series of experiments in the 1960s designed to identify a food or nutrient that could help counteract the effects of nuclear radiation and fallout. In a series of articles published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal, they reported that common sea vegetables such as kombu and kelp contain a substances, sodium alginate, that could reduce by 50 to 80 percent the amount of radioactive strontium absorbed through the digestive system.

By the late 1980s and early 1990s, Japanese researchers, influenced by Dr. Akizuki’s experience, weighed in on the quest. Kazumitsu Watanabe, professor of cancer and radiation at Hiroshima University’s atomic bomb radiation research center, reported that people who ate miso regularly tested up to five times more resistant to radiation than people not eating miso. Laboratory studies on mice further confirmed that miso specifically helped protect the small intestine from harm.

Meanwhile, in the Soviet Union, a series of nuclear accidents resulted in further use of dietary methods to neutralize radioactive particles. In 1990, as director of the Kushi Institute, a macrobiotic educational center in western Massachusetts, I organized an airlift of several thousand pounds of miso, sea vegetables, and other detoxifying foods to physicians in Chelyabinsk and Chernobyl.

The following guidelines are recommended to help protect against radioactivity from the current nuclear accidents in Japan:

more info: Diet to Help Protect Against Nuclear Radiation By Alex Jack | DiaNuke.org http://bit.ly/15bgQzg

More info:

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Published by: Chaffee on Aug 22, 2013
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Health Condition and Diet: The Way to HealthWritten by Dr. Tatsuichiro AkizukiTranslated and edited by Hiroko Furo, Ph.D.I. IntroductionI am not a scientist who stays in a lab and does scientific research all thetime. Neither am I a scientific scholar who publishes one scholarly articleafter another. It has been more than 30 years since I got into the field of medicine, and during those years I have been examining my patients as wellas getting sick myself. After examining numerous patients and children of physically weak constitutions, I became painfully aware of the difficulty of curing sickness and diseases as well as finding their causes. I have sincebeen thinking about problems such as condition, constitution and diet. Icannot emphasize enough the importance of our daily diet to our health and,consequently, the degree of sickness and effects of medication and its abilityto cure. After conducting much research on various healing diets, I finallyfound Miso, which I realized was the basis of the Japanese diet. This is thetraditional food that has been passed from generation to generation in Japanand is fit to the condition and constitution of the Japanese people. It likensto the path of philosophers in the West as well as those in the East. Misostarted far before the origin of science, and its beneficial effect is somethingthat should be proved scientifically.Dr. Tatsuichiro Akizuki at the St. Francis HospitalTable of Contents1.
 
Introduction2.
 
Condition Medicine3.
 
Condition4.
 
Diet5.
 
Nutrition6.
 
Food7.
 
Miso8.
 
The Elements of Miso9.
 
Protein10.
 
Fat11.
 
Minerals12.
 
Bacterias13.
 
Medical Observation and Consideration14.
 
Conclusion
 
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15.
 
AppendixI. Introduction:The reason I chose to be a medical doctor is a little bit different from otherdoctors. From my youth, I was very weak and sickly. My sisters were alsosick and mostly confined to bedrest because of tuberculosis or pleuralinflammation. I chose to be a medical doctor because I wanted to overcomemy sickly condition. However, the more I studied medicine and medicalscience, the more I realized that the medical treatments currently beingconducted are not sufficient for my weak condition and constitution.Modern medical treatment is symptomatic treatment or operation treatment.They are last resort treatments; not preventative medicine, but outcometreatment. I came to realize that this is not true medical treatment.The development of new chemical treatments has led to progress in killingviruses and bacteria which are considered to be the direct cause of disease.There are also now operations that will cut off the diseased part. This can beconsidered preventive medicine. However, after deep consideration, I havecome to believe that these viruses or families of bacteria could be consideredthe early stage of sickness. They are not the true cause of disease in thehuman body. So what seems to be preventive medicine can actually beoutcome medicine. Therefore, various chronic diseases in fact are not curedat present. Some doctors say that if we catch the disease at an early stage of diagnosis, the patient will be cured. However, this is not true.II. Condition Medicine:I was disappointed by these results, so I tried to find a true medicine inpreventive medicine. However, there are some reasons why these outcometreatments should be done. I am not saying that outcome treatment is notbeneficial: I am just saying that preventive medicine is more attractive tome.True medicine, or medical science, is supposed to better the humancondition and make the body immune to disease. Additionally, even thoughwe get sick, the body should have the ability to cure the disease by itself.Also, even though a person suffers from a chronic disease, by changinghealth conditions the sickness would be cured after a while. This is the
 
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medicine I am talking about.At present there is much research being conducted to find out a way to avoidsickness or, when people do get sick, to reduce its seriousness. Take forexample flu shots or vaccinations for smallpox. However, these areindividual treatments for individual diseases, and I would like to treat theentire body. In truth, this is much easier. Whether we are sick or wish toprevent sickness or whether the disease is serious or not, these problems aredetermined by our health condition.III. Health Condition:There is a disease called cancer. The treatment for cancer at this time is tocatch it at an early stage and cut it out in an extensive surgery and thenfollow up with strong radiation treatments and chemotherapy. However,these treatments do not always work.These days, lots of people are suggesting that we find a human host that hascancer for study. For example, in some cancer patients, the cancer becomesvery aggressive. However, other cancer patients have a more slow-growingcancer. In other words, some people can live with those cancer cells for fiveor even ten years. Some effort has been made to try and research thesedifferences.This can be applied to not only cancer but any disease. For example,Tuberculosis is often considered to be the result of the tuberculosis virus.However, tuberculosis’s severity really depends on the health condition of the patient. Some patients can be cured of tuberculosis easily while othersdo not respond to even varied treatments. These differences depend on thepatients’ health condition.I myself was very weak and sickly, so while I was studying medicine myinterest was pointed towards the health condition. If we do not solve thisproblem and change health conditions for the better, we can never see thetrue results of medicine.IV. Diet:

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