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Working Matters - Volume 1, Issue 3 ~ June, 2009

Working Matters - Volume 1, Issue 3 ~ June, 2009

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Published by KathleenH
A newsletter published by the Reel Rumours Weekly which explores the dymanics and issues of working in the film industry.
A newsletter published by the Reel Rumours Weekly which explores the dymanics and issues of working in the film industry.

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Published by: KathleenH on Jun 09, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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03/25/2011

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“Leadership is the art of getting someone else to dosomething you want donebecause he wants todo it.” Dwight D. Eisenhower 
 
Leadership is?
Leadership is a word usedin everyday news and con-versation. However, fre-quently the folks discuss-ing leadership can havecompletely separate per-ceptions of what is ex-pected of a leader andwon’t even know it. Nowonder there can be somebig discrepancies in whatis expected from a personin a leadership roles.According to projectGLOBE (Global Leader-ship and OrganizationalBehavior Effectiveness),leadership is about
influ-
 
encing, motivating, and enabling others to con-tribute toward the effec-tiveness and success of the organizations of which they are members.
From the abovedefinition it ispretty clear thatleadership is notexclusively thedomain of theboss, head of de-partment, produc-tion manager,best boy etc.Leadershipcan be, and isoften devel-oped and displayed byanyone in an organiza-tion. This model isknown as
shared leader-ship
.As most of us know intui-tively, shared leadership,
 
happens in all produc-tions and organizations.This type of leadershipmodel isn’t always for-mally recognized, par-ticularly where there is astrict preference for for-mal or vertical leadershipmodels.
~ Kathleen Higgins
 How do you define leadership?
Leadership, Not Just For Leaders Anymore -part 1
SELF REFLECTION?
 AFTER READING THISARTICLE, MAYBE JOT-TING DOWN SOME IDEASFOR YOURSELF WILL BEHELPFUL.
 How did you definition of leadership differ? Howdid it change? Part 1
Consider your favoriteboss or leader, what leadership styles do theyuse effectively?
What’s your type of lead-ership?
What leadership stylebrings out the best in you? Why?
 How can knowing moreabout leadership help you in the workplace?
Types of Leadership ~ A brief overview.- part 2
So what are these lead-ership types?
Leadership is one of themost researched and pos-sibly the most complextopics in the study of or-ganizational behavior.The resultant research hasgenerated an enormousvolume of literaturewhich can be pretty muchorganized into five per-spectives:These five leadershipperspectives are:
Competency Based
Behavioral
Contingency
Transformational
Implicit
V
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Working Matters
LEADERSHIP?
THE REEL RUMOURS WEEKLY WORKING MATTERS NEWSLETTER
 
Leadership is?
1
Types of Leadership
2
Competency Based
3
Behavioral Leadership
4
Contingency Model
5
Transformational Leaders
6
Implicit Leadership
7
References
8
INSIDE THIS ISSUE: 
 
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oriented behaviors identified byshowing mutual trust and respectfor subordinates, demonstratinggenuine concernfor their needs.The other clusterrepresents a task-oriented leader-ship style andincludes behav-iors that definestructure work roles.Task-oriented leaders assign em-ployees specific tasks, clarify dutiesand procedures and ensure theyfollow company rules and challengeemployees to push beyond theirnormal standards.
What are the behaviors that makeleaders effective?
The
behavioral lead-ership
perspectivelooks at what behav-iors make leaders ef-fective.There are two clustersof leadership behav-iors which dominatethis model.The first is people-In the
competency model of leader-ship
there is a notion that effectiveleaders possess specific personalcharacteristics or competencies.There is a belief that these skills,knowledge, aptitudes and personalcharacteristics lead to superior per-formance in leaders and perform-ance of subordinates.The main categories of leadershipcompetencies are:
personality,
self-concept,
drive,
integrity,
leadership motivation,
expertise,
cognitive intelligence,
emotional intelligence.The competency perspective is cur-rently quite popular. It does havesome limitations. It does assumethat all leaders have the same char-acteristics and personal traits canapply to all situations. This is afalse assumption. There is also anemphasis that leadership is some-thing mythical within a person.Experts emphasize that leadership ispurely relational. Effective leadersare so because of their favorablerelationship with followers. Lead-ership can not be identified withoutconsidering the quality of thoserelationships.
~ Kathleen.Higgins
It takes a lot of effort for most lead-ers to continually choose and imple-
The “it depends” perspective.
The
contingency leadership per-spective
is based on the idea that themost appropriate leadership styledepends on the situation.There is an assumption that leadersmust be both insightful and flexible,this is difficult for most leaders todo and most leaders typically have apreferred style.ment a different style for everysituation and readiness circum-stance.
Behavioral Leadership - Part 4Competency Based Leadership—Part 3Contingency Based Leadership - Part 5
Contingency Based Leadershipis situation based 
T
HERE
 
ARE
 
TWO
 
CLUSTERS
 
OF
 
BEHAVIORAL
 
LEADERSHIP
 
PERSPECTIVES
:
P
EOPLE
O
RIENTED
 
T
ASK
O
RIENTED
 
 
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These preconceived beliefs by fol-lowers are called
leadership proto-types
.This prototype compari-son process occurs as aresult of the follower’sinherent need to quicklyevaluate people as lead-ers, even though leader-ship effectiveness if oftenambiguous and might not
 
Preconceived Leadership
Implicit leadership theory states thatfollowers evaluate a leader’s effec-tiveness in terms of how well thatperson fits their own preconceivedbeliefs about the behaviors of effec-tive leadership.These people or followers have aninnate ability inflate the influence of these leaders on normal organiza-tional events.be apparent for a lengthy period of time.
~ Kathleen.Higgins
Implicit Leadership Perspectives - Part 7
How to define the ability to trans-form and inspire people?
Transformative leadership perspec-tive
explains how leaders changeteams or organizations. These lead-ers enact change by creating, com-municating, and modeling a visionfor the organization and inspiringemployees to strive for that vision.These leaders are agents of change.An excellent example of a transfor-mative leader is Guy Laliberte’creator of Cirque du Soleil.Be careful though— this style of leadership is often confused withcharisma, which is strictly personaltrait which helps buildallegiance in followers.Charisma does not nec-essarily create changein an organization.Charismatic leadersoften produce highlydependent followers.Transformative leadersoften have the op-posite effect – theybuild follower em-powerment. Ulti-mately followerempowerment reduces dependence
Transformative Leadership - Part 6
on the leader and builds creativepositive envi-ronments.
~ Kathleen.HigginsGuy Laliberte—Cirque du SoleilTransformative Leader 

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