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Heavenly Raiment.

Heavenly Raiment.

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Published by glennpease
BY REV THOMAS T. LYNCH.


Revelations vii. 13, 14.

And one of the elders answered, saying unto me, What are these
which are arrayed in white robes ? and whence came they ?
And I said unto him, Sir, thou knowest. And he said to me,
These are they which came out of great tribulation, and have
washed their robes, and made them white in the blood of the
Lamb.
BY REV THOMAS T. LYNCH.


Revelations vii. 13, 14.

And one of the elders answered, saying unto me, What are these
which are arrayed in white robes ? and whence came they ?
And I said unto him, Sir, thou knowest. And he said to me,
These are they which came out of great tribulation, and have
washed their robes, and made them white in the blood of the
Lamb.

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Published by: glennpease on Aug 23, 2013
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HEAVELY RAIMET.BY REV THOMAS T. LYCH.Revelations vii. 13, 14.And one of the elders answered, saying unto me, What are thesewhich are arrayed in white robes ? and whence came they ?And I said unto him, Sir, thou knowest. And he said to me,These are they which came out of great tribulation, and havewashed their robes, and made them white in the blood of theLamb.Old Jerusalem was to the eye a very religious city ; andso is modern Rome. About the streets you might seemen walking in long robes ; and perhaps the commonpeople, as they passed, stepped aside to give room for theseample dresses. But we do not hear of any one so full of trust,of grateful affection towards the scribes in long clothing,that he or she sought to touch their garments. But therewas One who went through Jerusalem, and through thecities and villages of Judaea, clad no doubt in simple rai-ment ; and as he walked, there was a shrinking, tremblingsufferer, who said, " If I do but touch the hem of his gar-ment, I shall be whole." Had any one passed the robe of ascribe and trodden upon it, the scribe would have turnedround to him, perhaps, with eyes not pleasant to meet Butthis woman, fearing, yet believed; she touched the garmentof Christ, and she was healed. A great sufferer she hadbeen, and for a long time had she suffered Her calamitywas the constant waste of life, the constant \osa oi \taaX.■EL74 HEAVELY RAIMET.store which might have made her rich. She could not die
 
speedily, nor could she live easily. She was one of thatclass of sufferers that languish long, hoping to die ; saying," Oh, that thou wouldst hide me in the grave !" and yet ina happier hour saying, " Oh, that I might live for days andweeks, with such pleasure and such ability as I brieflyenjoy to-day !" Well does she represent affection in itsdiseased waste ; well does she represent that loss of vitalitywhich we feel when the heart is wrong. Life ebbs andebbs, and yet still the stream comes: it trickles whenit ought to flow ; and, alas, often in its fullest flow, weare reminded that it will shortly and painfully pass away.She touched the garment of Christ. How profound issimplicity ! His garment : it is his ; and therefore itis dear, and therefore it has power. She did not reason,saying, " How can a dead robe give a living strength THis robe : it is his own; it is in its effects part of himseliIs this utter mystery to us ? We know such familiarfacts as that the garment is warmed with the life of man ;such familiar and alarming facts as that the diseases of theframe may issue through the silken clothing that girts itBound. But do we know no more ? Do not the noveliststell us, and that again and again, that the lover cannotbe touched with the skirts of her dress to whom his heartdoes homage, without feeling that heart tremble ? Life inits finest effluences comes to those whose susceptibilityis keen to affection. This woman, full of faith, full of fear;burdened with nervousness, was yet, through the verykeenness of her trouble, able to exercise a peculiarlytender and affectionate trust But she dared not face eventhe Saviour ; she touched him from behind. And many,in their hope to get a benefit from the Gospel to whichtheir suffering heart does* homage, dare not face the Lord ;HEAVELY RAIMET. 75tat thejr cottie to hiiri as froih behind ; and he lets them(tome. He did not say, * There is a woman coming totftioh me ;" and so turn all eyes upon her to embarrass her,
 
aild aggravate her pain. But when she had touched him,then he turned round. Shfe approached him from behind,bat he turned the light of his kind countenance upon her.And ftow, what shall she do with her new strength but,when he asks, "Who touched me?" say, " Lord, it was I;"ted whilst yet trembling, give thanks ? For if the soul ishealed, it yet trembles with a sense of that great and happywonder that has been wrought upon it. We do not be-come less sensitive, though we cease to have the samediseased sensitiveness, when Christ has touched us.Through his very garment the virtue flowed. Yes, andthrough the garment in which religious truth may clotheitself in our utterance ; through the garment in which holycharacter may clothe itself in daily action ; through the gar-ments in which our very inquiries after God may clothethemselves in the form of our opinion, virtue streams forth.For even as the body, itself so intimately a part of us, isnevertheless appropriately called a robe, so our language,our habits, all the aspects of our life — and these are ournriment — are part of our true self They are indeed moresejyarable from us than body is from spirit ; for a man mayhave ten times ten changes of raiment, but he has but onebody ; though of that the expressions of the life possibleare indeed manifold. But even as the soul and the body,when the soul is pure and the man has been redeemed,become most intimately one, so, that which is yet moreexternal to the man than his body, has a happy union withhim when God has made him good. And in proportion«8 we are good, through the very dress of our life, — thatwhich exhibits us exteriority to our neighbour, — \Jafe\t-76 HEAVELY RAIMET.tue of our God may pass. So that not alone the gloriousand gentle Gospel may cure the trembling sufferers asthey approach it as from behind; then face round to them,speak gently, and bring them on the knees of confession,

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