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VIVE LEMURS – Conserving the Lemurs of Madagascar (WWF – 2013)

VIVE LEMURS – Conserving the Lemurs of Madagascar (WWF – 2013)

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Published by HayZara Madagascar
The globally unique landscape of Madagascar on the edge of the West Indian Ocean is home to 5% of the world’s plant and animal species, of which 90% are endemic to Madagascar. More primates can be found here than anywhere else in the world. These include the extraordinary lemurs.

Little is known about many of the region’s lemurs, many for example are only just being discovered now. More than a hundred species are now know to scientists making Madagascar the highest priority for primate conservation today, so significant that scientists have named the island the ‘eighth continent’. The lemurs vary in species and status: from ‘pocket-sized’ mouse lemurs that can easily fit in the palm of a hand, to culturally significant species; from bizarre dancing lemurs to other that have evolved unique abilities to catch prey. Others still, are so seldom seen that they have taken on mythical status. What is known, are that their futures are uncertain.
Many of the lemur species are endangered. A combination of human pressures: hunting and international wildlife trade, habitat destruction, particularly deforestation and degradation, and infrastructure development, is quickly eroding populations of these extraordinary species.
The clock is ticking: over a 50 year period Madagascar lost 40% of its forest cover.
The globally unique landscape of Madagascar on the edge of the West Indian Ocean is home to 5% of the world’s plant and animal species, of which 90% are endemic to Madagascar. More primates can be found here than anywhere else in the world. These include the extraordinary lemurs.

Little is known about many of the region’s lemurs, many for example are only just being discovered now. More than a hundred species are now know to scientists making Madagascar the highest priority for primate conservation today, so significant that scientists have named the island the ‘eighth continent’. The lemurs vary in species and status: from ‘pocket-sized’ mouse lemurs that can easily fit in the palm of a hand, to culturally significant species; from bizarre dancing lemurs to other that have evolved unique abilities to catch prey. Others still, are so seldom seen that they have taken on mythical status. What is known, are that their futures are uncertain.
Many of the lemur species are endangered. A combination of human pressures: hunting and international wildlife trade, habitat destruction, particularly deforestation and degradation, and infrastructure development, is quickly eroding populations of these extraordinary species.
The clock is ticking: over a 50 year period Madagascar lost 40% of its forest cover.

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Published by: HayZara Madagascar on Aug 23, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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05/14/2014

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 WWF is one of the world’s largest and most experienced independentconservation organizations, with over 5 million supporters and a globalnetwork active in more than 100 countries. WWF’s mission is to stop the degradation of the planet’s naturalenvironment and to build a future in which humans live in harmony  with nature, by: conserving the world’s biological diversity, ensuringthat the use of renewable natural resources is sustainable, andpromoting the reduction of pollution and wasteful consumption. Written and designed by Christian Thompson (the green room) www.greenroomenvironmental.com, with advisory by Martina Lippuner, WWF Madagascar & Western Indian OceanPublished in June 2013 by WWF-World Wide Fund For Nature(Formerly World Wildlife Fund). Any reproduction in full or in partmust mention the title and credit the above-mentioned publisher as thecopyright owner.© Text 2013 WWF All rights reserved
Front cover
The endangered Indri lemur
(Indri indri)
in the Palmarium Reserve(Ankanin ‘ny Nofy), east coast of Madagascar © Andrea Schieber
 
Contents
Map of Madagascar and Western Indian Ocean 04Foreword 07Preface 09A persecuted primate 1050 years of WWF in Madagascar 13Lifeline timeline 14Executive summary 19Introduction 21Madagascar: Treasure island 21WWF priority landscapes 25Land lemurs 28Lemurs on the brink 32 6.Trouble in the trees: Threats to lemurs 46Vive lemurs: Furture-making in Madagascar 48Appendix 1. 50References 52
    ©   M   a   r    k   u   s   F    l   e   u   t   e
Rainforest, Masoala National Park, Madagascar

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