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04. Windows XP Admin Tips-Network

04. Windows XP Admin Tips-Network

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Windows XP Admin Tips ~ network ~1
Windows XP Admin Tips- network -
1. Avoiding APIPA
Created on
Jul 27, 2006
.
Last Modified on
Nov 07, 2006
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Last Modified by
Mitch Tulloch
.How to avoid problems arising from APIPAWindows XP computers can be assigned IP addresses two ways: manually using staticaddresses or automatically using DHCP. If your computer is configured to use DHCPhowever, a problem can occur if the DHCP server is down when your computer needs torenew its lease. This happens typically if you reboot your computer when the DHCP isunavailable, and in this case Windows XP uses Automatic IP Address Allocation(APIPA) to automatically assign itself an address of the form 169.254.x.y. Once yourcomputer has this address however, it typically can't communicate on the network anymore. To prevent this kind of situation from happening, you can assign your computeran alternate IP address to fall back on when your computer can't contact a DHCP serverto lease an address. This is done by using the Alternate Configuration tab of the TCP/IPproperties for your computer's Local Area Connection. A typical situation where youmight want to use this might be if you have a laptop at home where you use DHCP toobtain an IP address from your ISP. If you take your laptop to work sometimes and yourworkplace is a small business that uses static addressing instead of DHCP, you can assignyour computer a static address on the Alternate Configuration tab so that it can participatein your work network when present at work. Note that the Alternate Configuration tab isonly visible when you've selected Obtain An IP Address Automatically on the Generaltab of your TCP/IP Properties.
2. Using XP as a router
Created on
Mar 01, 2006
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Last Modified on
Mar 29, 2006
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Last Modified by
Mitch Tulloch
.A cheap and easy way of using an XP box as a router.A cheap and easy way of adding a router to your network is to use a surplus PC withWindows XP Professional installed on it. Just install an additional network card in theToday is the best day to learn new things, try hard as much as u can.
 
Windows XP Admin Tips ~ network ~2box and then configure the registry setting below and Presto! Your XP box becomes ableto route (forward) IP packets from one interface to another.Open Regedit and navigate to:HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Tcpip\ParametersFind the following registry value:IPEnableRouterSet this value to 1 to enable IP routing on the box.After doing this, reboot the machine. You may also need to disable Windows Firewall onthe machine.
3. Reliable File and Folder Sharing in Windows XP
Created on
Aug 13, 2005
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Last Modified on
Sep 01, 2005
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Last Modified by
Varun Sud
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Explains how to share files and folders in Windows XP over a network. It was writtenspecifically because users in our college network had unpredictable results in sharingfiles over LAN on Windows XP.This tip is on sharing files and folders on a local network in Windows XP. It has beentested on Windows XP Professional (with and without SP2).Many users of WinXP have experienced difficulty in sharing files and folders over ourcollege network whether or not simple file sharing is enabled. The approach that I havefound to work consistently is:1. Disable simple file sharing from My Computer --> Tools menu --> Folder Options -->View tab --> Advanced Settings2. Open Control Panel --> Administrative Tools --> Services. Enable the Server serviceby making startup Automatic or Manual. This is a standard service needed for sharingfiles and folders under WinXp.3. Open Control Panel --> Administrative Tools --> Computer Management. Scroll toSystem Tools --> Shared Folders --> Shares. From Action menu, select 'Add share' andfollow the instructions.Today is the best day to learn new things, try hard as much as u can.
 
Windows XP Admin Tips ~ network ~34. You may also want to add users to Administrator or other groups for shared folderaccess. Under Computer Management, scroll to Local Users and Groups. To add user toAdministrator group, select the group name and choose Add from Action menu. This canalso be used to add domain users as local admins.Sharing files on computers directly connected to Internet is not recommended. However,restrict access to specific users using above procedure mitigates security risks.
4. Map Your Network For Better Protection and Incident Response
Created on
Mar 07, 2005
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Last Modified on
Apr 01, 2005
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Last Modified by
Tony Bradley
.It is difficult to protect devices that you don't even know exist. In larger enterprises it isvery easy to lose track of the asset inventory which leads to complacency about roguedevices. In order to effectively protect the network and to respond to incidents efficiently,an updated asset inventory and network map should always be handy.In an enterprise network with thousands or even tens of thousands of devices, it seemslike assets are constantly coming and going. When a site or department administrator seesa new device they are likely to be complacent and simply assume that it belongs tosomeone else in the enterprise rather than being suspicious of the rogue device.Rogue or unknown devices that are added to the network are often missed in patch andsecurity update deployments and they can be a constant source of headaches when itcomes to trying to proactively protect and defend a large enterprise network.If a security incident does occur, an updated and logically organized asset inventory,combined with a current and accurate network map will make response and forensicinvestigation that much simpler. If a 3rd-party or law enforcement agencies are involvedthey will need an overview of the network architecture and environment in order toconduct an investigation.Policies should be written to define how new assets are added to the inventory and thesteps that must be taken to include them on the asset inventory and network map prior to joining the network. But, no matter how foolproof that policy may be, it is virtuallyinevitable that new, rogue devices will eventually appear on the network.To detect the rogue devices and fight to enforce the policy and ward off complacency,you can run periodic scans of the network using any of a wide variety of tools that canscan and report back information regarding the network and the devices attached. Manyof the tools will report the IP address, MAC address, type of device or operating systemand more. Below are a few tools you can consider for network mapping:Today is the best day to learn new things, try hard as much as u can.

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