Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
The Will of God the Best Rule of Duty.

The Will of God the Best Rule of Duty.

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1 |Likes:
Published by glennpease
BY LANT CARPENTER


PART I.



PSALM XXXVII. ; 31.

THE LAW OF HIS GOD IS IN HIS HEART; NONE OF HIS STEPS SHALL SLIP
BY LANT CARPENTER


PART I.



PSALM XXXVII. ; 31.

THE LAW OF HIS GOD IS IN HIS HEART; NONE OF HIS STEPS SHALL SLIP

More info:

Published by: glennpease on Aug 24, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

08/24/2013

pdf

text

original

 
THE WILL OF GOD THE BEST RULE OF DUTY.BY LAT CARPETER PART I.PSALM XXXVII. ; 31.THE LAW OF HIS GOD IS I HIS HEART; OE OF HIS STEPSSHALL SLIPThese words of the pious Psalmist clearly imply twoimportant truths ; — ^in the first place^ that the Will of God^ considered as the rule of duty^ is the most safeand secure guide ; — and that an habitual regard to HisWill is the best preservative from all moral danger. Hewho steadily aims to regulate his dispositions^ and toguide his conduct, by what he knows of the Will of God, cannot wander far or long from the path of duty.He who makes obedience to the Will of God his pre-vailing motive, who lives in His fear, and under thehabitual influence of the desire to obtain His appro-bation and shun His displeasure, cannot fall into fataltransgressions or neglect of duty. He will walk up-THE WILL OF GOD THE RULE OF DUTY. 395rightly; and he will consequently walk securely. Hemust be restrained, by the power of this ennoblingprinciple, from all known and wilful transgression ;and, in so far as he is under the influence of a singlesteady aim to do the Will of God, he must proceedin the way of duty with consistency, with firmness,with security, and in general with inward peace and
 
satisfaction.These truths, though distinct, are nevertheless veryintimately connected together. The Will of God maybe r^arded as the Rule of duty, or as the motive to theperformance of duty ; but there never, perhaps, was aninstance, in which the two views were not united in theactual employment of them. He who honestly makesthe Will of God his Rule of conduct, can scarcely avoidperceiving that it is his duty to act under the influenceof a regard to His Will, — that it is his duty to live asseeing Him who is invisible, and (while he endeavoursto guide his conduct and his dispositions by the com-mands of God,) to make the desire of His approbation,the fear of His displeasure, his direct and habitualmotives in the regulation of heart and life. On theother hand, he who is really and habitually influencedby the desire to obey the Divine Will, cannot but beled by that desire to use every means in his power toknow what is His Will. If he sincerely and heartilydesire to obey God, he will make what he knows of HisWill the guide of his life. In short, if the desire toobey the Will of God operates powerfully in the heart,the Will of God will be made the guide of duty. Andif the Will of God is sincerely and heartily made the396 SBRMO XXVII.guide of duty, the desire to obey the Will of God mustnecessarily operate powerfully as a motive. If the lawof God really is in the hearty it will guide and it willinfluence. It will show us our duty and prompt usto pursue it. And, when this is the case, it requiresbut little experience in life to perceive, that our pathwill usually be free from perplexitie sand hindrances^moral dangers will be easily foreseen, temptations willhave little power; and, in proportion as the Law of God rules in the heart, our footsteps will not slide, — ^we
 
shall proceed with steadiness and security in the way of duty, — the testimony 6f an approving conscience willlighten its difficulties, — and, supported by an humblehope of the approbation of Him to whom all hearts areopen, this will afiford inward peace, and a cheeringprospect of never-ending happiness in that state wheresin and darkness shall be known no more.In what farther I shall at present lay before yon, Ishall not attempt to preserve any marked distinctionbetween the Will of God considered as the Rule of duty,and considered as the motive to action ; but I shall haveonly in view to show that the Will of God is the bestguide of conduct. At first sight it really appearsunnecessary in any way to attempt to prove this. Itseems a self-evident maxim, that the Will of an all-wiseand good Being must afford the best guidance to Hisweak and erring creatures ; and it is probable that noconsistent and serious believer in the existence of sucha Being, can entertain a doubt that, wherever theDivine Will is known, it is our duty to obey it, andthat it cannot but be for our interest and happinessTHE WILL OP GOD THB RULE OF DUTY. 397to obey it. The state of the case however, is, thatin a variety of instances we are left, even with all theaid of Revelation (great and important as it is,) toascertain the Will of God from the beneficial tendencyof actions to others or to ourselves ; and, in consequence,many moralists have been led to make this tendency thecriterion of virtue and the foundation of duty. Othersagain, observing that the dictates of their consciencesafford them a correct and extensive Rule of duty, con-sider the conscience as the best moral guide; thoughmost of those would allow the necessity of enlighteningthe conscience by what is known as to the Divine Willby express Revelation. Others have made virtue con-

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->