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Behold the Lamb of God

Behold the Lamb of God

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Published by glennpease
By THOMAS SCOTT



JOHN, 1. 29.

Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the
sin of the world.
By THOMAS SCOTT



JOHN, 1. 29.

Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the
sin of the world.

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Published by: glennpease on Aug 26, 2013
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BEHOLD THE LAMB OF GODBy THOMAS SCOTTJOH, 1. 29.Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away thesin of the world.tJ OH Baptist, the predicted forerunner of theMessiah, was doubtless well informed of his per-son, offices, and kingdom. He prepared the wayof the Lord, by preaching repentance, as indis-pensably necessary to a participation of the bless-ings about to be communicated : and while hebaptized the people with water, as an outwardemblem of their souls being washed from sin ; hedeclared that the Redeemer would baptize themwith the Holy Ghost and with fire. He bare wit-ness to the Saviour as the Son of God, the Bride-groom of the Church, and " the Lamb of God," which taketh away the sin of the world." Hecried, saying, " This was he of whom I spake, He" that cometh after me is preferred before rue;1 Preached Good-friday,502 SERMO XIX." for he was before me : and of his fulness have" we all received."' lie added on another oc-casion, " The Father loveth the Son, and hath" given all things into his hand. He that be-" lieveth on the Son hath everlasting life ; and he" that believeth not the Son shall not see life : but" the wrath of God abideth upon him. 1 "
 
It is evident, that this most eminent servant of God laboured to communicate to his disciples ex-alted apprehensions of the Lord Jesus, and to ex-cite in them large expectations from him. Inhonouring the Son of God he was willing to abasehimself, " as unworthy to loose his shoe-latchet."He was astonished to think that the Saviourshould come to be baptized of him, when he wasconscious that as a sinner he stood in need of hisspiritual baptism : and when we consider the ex-cellency of John's character, with the extraordi-nary things spoken of him in scripture ; we shallknow what conclusions to draw from his testi-mony. Certainly he would not have concurredwith those, who employ all their abilities in tryingto persuade mankind not to think too highly of Christ, not to honour him too much, . and not todepend on him too entirely in the great concernsof eternal salvation. But the words of the textmust be exclusively our present subject; and fromthem we may enquire,John, iii. 35, 36.SERMO XIX. 503I. Or, what account Christ is called " The" Lamb of God."II. The import of the words, " Who taketh" away the sin of the world."III. The call to "Behold the Lamb of God."IV. The peculiar instructions to be derivedfrom meditating on this subject.
 
I. On what account is the Lord Jesus calledThe Lamb of God?"We should not forget, my brethren, that thelanguage of scripture was dictated by the HolySpirit, and demands our most reverent attentionon that account. If then we interpret it in a ge-neral way, and treat those metaphors under whichdivine mysteries are revealed, as we would do thelanguage of mere men, who often use pompouswords and extravagant figures of speech withoutmuch meaning; we shall be found guilty of de-spising the sacred oracles. o doubt every me-taphor or illustration was selected, in preference toall others, for some wise and holy reasons ; andsuggests important instruction to the teachableSERMOX XIX.student. This must especially be the case, wit*that expression of the text, which engages ourpresent attention : because it frequently occurswith reference to the character, sufferings, andsalvation of Christ.A lamb is a well known emblem of innocence,gentleness, patience, and purity : and no doubt anallusion was made to these things in speaking of the Redeemer as the Lamb of God. Yet we can-not suppose that this was the principal meaning of that appellation, when we duly consider the vari-cue passages in which it is used : for in what sensecould a lamb take away sin, except by becomingan atoning sacrifice?The slaughter of innocent animals, and consu-ming the whole or some part of their bodies upon

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