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The Ukrainian Weekly 1983-46

The Ukrainian Weekly 1983-46

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Published by: The Ukrainian Weekly on Jun 12, 2009
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05/11/2014

 
Published
by
the
Ukrainian National Association
inc.,
a
fraternal non-profit association!
rainian Weekly
vol
U
No.
46
THE
UKRAINIAN
WEEKLY SUNDAY, NOVEMBER
ІЗ,
1983
CO OB
(CХЯ-
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-ХЛ
zs-
ОЧО
-A
2
!
OO
Z
"
о
о о ті
OznО 3)
3D
-
м
nt
о
;
о
со
о
іл
о -
25 cents
Conquest,
Mace
to
testify
at
Senate
collectivization hearing
Senate Foreign Relations Committeepasses resolution
on
1932-33 famine
by Eugene lwanciw
WASHINGTON
Dr. Robert Con–
quest
of
Stanford University
and Dr.
James Mace
ot the
Harvard UkrainianResearch institute will serve
as
wit–nesses
lor
the Senate Agriculture Com–mittee's November
15
hearing on Sovietcollectivization,
of
agriculture
and its
effects
-
including
the
1932-33 GreatFamine
in
Ukraine, reported the Ukrai–nian American Caucus.The UAC has been working with
the
Agriculture Committee staff
in the
witness selection process.
A
list
of
potential witnesses was compiled by theUAC and submitted
to the
committee,which
has
made
all the
selections.The first part
of
the hearing will focuson
the
man-made famine
in
Ukraine.The second part
of
the hearing focuseson
the
current state
of
Soviet agricul–ture
and its
future prospects.Both
Drs.
Conquest
and
Mace haveaccepted invitations
to
testify before theAgriculture Committee.
The two
well-known scholars will
be
addressing
the
events during
the
early 1930s whichculminated
in the
deaths
of
over
7
million Ukrainians during 1932-33.The importance
of
the hearing is thata permanent historical record will
be
created
in the
U.S. Congress detailingthe events
of
the early 1930s
-
includ–ing
the
famine
- and
exposing Sovietpolicy
in
Ukraine
at
that time.Senate Concurrent Resolution
70
will,
if
passed
by the
Senate,
put the
U.S.
Senate
on
record
as
condemningthe Soviet-created famine
in
Ukraine.The
two
actions
by the
Senate
are
related
and
will pave
the
way
for
moreinquiry into past
and
present Sovietpolicies toward Ukraine.
McMaster conference focuses onhistory of Ukrainian-Jewish relations
by Andrii Krawchuk
HAMILTON,
om. - The fourth in
a series
of
Ukrainian conferences
was
held
at
McMaster University herefrom October 17-20.
its
11
sessions weredesigned
to
examine the theme "Jewish-Ukrainian Relations
in
Historical Per–spective." Thirty papers were readbytheinvited speakers, tracing
the
historicaldevelopment
of
Jewish-Ukrainian rela–tions from the Kievan Rus'period to themodern
era.
As
in
previous conferences, Ukrai–nian historians convened with theircounterparts from another ethnic groupin order
to
discuss common areas
of
concern
in
academic research.
The
uniqueness of such an enterprise is that,in order
to
succeed,
it
requires
a
degreeof self-critical openness
on
both sides.Participants
of the
McMaster confe–rence appeared
to be
sensitive
to
thisneed.in preparation
for the
conference,
a
book titled "Jewish-Ukrainian Rela–tions: Two Solitudes'" was published,
its
authors,
the
co-organizers
of the
con–ference, Howard Aster
and
Peter
J.
Potichny, expressed
the
feeling thatthey were "stepping into
an
intellectualminefield"
in
writing
the
book.This apprehension
was
shared
by
many
of
the conference speakers, ivanL. Rudnytsky spoke
in
his paper
of
thetwo groups
now
meeting together
as
"...two peoples living
for
centuries sideby side on the same soil, both victims ofunfavorable historical circumstancesover which they had no control, and yetseparated by
a
wall of incomprehension,mutual fears, resentments
and
recrimi–nations,
by the
memories
of
past grie–vances,
and by
present conflicts
of
interest."The topic
of
Jewish-Ukrainian rela–tions
is
potentially volatile
for
otherreasons
as
well.First, there
is a
dearth of research
in
thearea.
As a
result, opinions vary
on the
admissibility of certain source materials(for example, Soviet sources),
and on
the manner of interpreting such sources.Second, cultural biases are bound
to
obstruct any facile attempts at dialogue,if
for
most Ukrainians,
the
namesKhmelnytsky and Petliura are associat–ed with the idea
of
heroism,
to
the Jewthey
are a
reminder
of
pogroms
in
Ukraine.in order
to
overcome
the
apparentimpasse, much scholarly groundwork
is
needed
in
order
to
establish
a set of
mutually acceptable terms
of
reference.The McMaster conference
was an
attempt to take the first few steps in thatvery direction.The first
two
sessions began
in a
conciliatory tone. Covering
the
periodup
to the end of the
18th century,
the
speakers included Omeljan Pritsak(Harvard Ukrainian Research institute)and Shmuel Ettinger (Hebrew University). There appeared
to be
agreementthat until
the
early
17th
century,
no
significant tension existed
in
Ukrainianlands between
the
peasants ancf
the
Jews.Also,when tensions
did
emerge,they were due to socio-economic factors(increased rural-urban friction) and notsimply
to
conflicting religious convic–tions.Four papers addressed the violence of(Continued on
paf 12)
WASHINGTON
The senate
Foreign Relations Committee Oil Fuesday morning, November X. passed
and
sent
to
the full Senate
for
considerationSenate Concurrent Resolution
70
whichasks
the
president
to set
aside May 28,
19X4,
to
commemorate
the
1932-33Ukrainian famine.
The
resolution alsoasks
the
president
to
urge
the
Sovietgovernment
to
lift restrictions
on
foodparcels
and
other necessities sent
by
private individuals from outside
the
USSR.The announcement
of
the committeeaction
was
made
by the
UkrainianAmerican Caucus
(UAC)
which
is
spearheading
the
move
to get the
resolution passed
in the
Senate beforeCongress adjourns
for the
year
on
November
18.
During committee consideration
of
S. Con. Res. 70. Sen. Charles
H.
Percy(R-lll.),. committee chairman, notedthat
the
State Department favors
the
purpose
of the
resolution.
To
date,
62
senators have agreed
to
support
the
resolution.Sens. Ernest
F.
"Fritz" Hollings (D–S.C.) and Pete
v.
Domenici (R-N.M.),the prime sponsors
of the
resolution,submitted statements
in
support
of
themeasure,
as
did Rep. Hamilton Fish
Jr.
(R-N.Y.), whose father, Hamilton FishSr., served
in
Congress at the time of thefamine
and on May 28, 1934,
intro–duced House Resolution 399 condemn–ing
the
man-made famine. The currentresolution would mark
the
50th anni–versary
of the
introduction
of Rep.
Fish's resolution.Calling
the
committee's attention
to
the holocaust committed against
the
Ukrainian people 50 years ago, and
the
cover-up which followed, both Sens.Hollings
and
Domenici stated that
the
time
has
come
for the
United States
to
be
on
record condemning this atrocitywhich claimed over
7
million
men.
women
and
children
in
Ukraine.Sen. Hollings,
who is
seeking
the
Democratic nomination
for the
presi–dency. said:
"The
resolution that
you
have before
you
breaks
a
long silenceand recognises
the
enormity
of the
famine, it also helps us recall that Sovietpolicies
and
behavior have changedlittle over
the
last half century.""it tells
us
that
the
shooting down
of
the Korean airliner with
its
269 civilianpassengers
in
September
was not an
isolated event,
and
reminds
us
that
a
government willing
to
exterminate
an
average
of
over 10,000
of
its own peoplea
day
does
not
hesitate
to
kill another269
for
reasons
of
state
or
whim,
it
tells
For more information about the
Se
nate Foreign Relations Committeeaction
and
S.Con.
Res.
70, see page
5.
us that
a
sober awareness of themotiva–tions
and
values informing Sovietbehavior
is
an absolute requirement
for
an effective
U.S.
policy toward
the
USSR,
in all
facets, including armscontrol,"
he
said.Sen. Domenici noted:
"it has
beensaid that the death
of
one individual
is a
tragedy,
the
death
of
millions
is a
statistic. Perhaps that best explains whyit has been so difficult
for
many to evenfocus
on
the genocide which took place50 years ago. The denials and cov„r-upby Soviet authorities,
as
well
as the
cover-up
by
many Western correspon–dents
at
that time adds
to the
lack
of
information
...
Facts, however, cannotbe covered
up
forever
and
sufficientinformation about what happened
and
why
has
become available
in the
Westnow."in
his
statement.
Rep.
Fish said:"indeed, very little
was
known
in
Congress about this unspeakable
and
indiscriminate extermination
of
inno–(Continued
on
page
2)
Sen.
Ernest
F.
Hollings
Sen.
Pete
Domenici
 
2:
11
HE
UKRAINIAN WEEKLY SUNDAY, NOVEMBER
13J983
NO. 46
І
Ukrainian Catholic Church:subject of increased persecution
Camp writings of vasyl Stusreveal conditions of prisoners
JERSEY C1TY, N.J. - For severalyears,sources in western Ukraine havereported an increase in official persecu–tion of the outlawed Ukrainian Catho–lic Church. But there have also beenindications, particularly in samvydavpublications, of a concomitant wide-spread resurgence in the Church'spopularity.Although the Church was officiallydissolved in 1946 by an illegally con–vened synod orchestrated by Sovietauthorities, a move that was accom–panied by the deportation or murder ofvirtually the entire church hierarchy, itcontinued to survive underground.Priests and bishops were secretly or–dained to minister to the religiousneeds of an estimated
5
million believers.The reported increase in Churchactivity may be directly attributed inpart to the election of Polish CardinalKarol Wojtyla to the papal throne, inMarch 1980, Pope John Paul
11
con–vened an Extraordinary Synod of theBishops of the Ukrainian CatholicChurch abroad for the purpose ofselecting an eventual successor toMetropolitan Josyf Slipyj, the spiritualhead and unofficial patriarch of theChurch, who was released from a Sovietprison in 1963.These and other actions prompted asenior official at the Department ofPropaganda and Agitation of the U–krainian Central Committee to say ofthe pope in 1981: "Unlike his predecessors, the new head of
the
vatican isfavorably disposed towards the un–fpunded pretensions of the Uniates."Other Soviet officials were morespecific, ivan Poluk, a senior official ofthe Central Committee of the Commu–nist Party of the Ukrainian SSR, wrotein 1979 thauhe pope was "trying to usethe still considerable active nucleus ofthe Catholic Church as a basis forextending religious influence over thepopulation of the republic."Mr. Poluk's article is of interestbecause it acknowledges that despite anintense ideological campaign againstthe Church, there still exists a "consi–derable active nucleus" of the Church.This acknowledgement has been corro–borated in a number of samvydav
Dissident sketch
MykolaKraynyk
BORN: April 20, 1935.OCCUPATlON: Teacher, historian.LATEST ARREST: September 29,
1979.
CHARGE: Accused of forming theUkrainian National Front, publish–ing the Ukrainian samvydav antho–logy "Prozrinnia"and the samvydavjournal Ukrainian Herald, and cir–culating nationalist literature underArticle
62
("anti-Soviet agitation andproganda'O, Article 64 ("participa–tion in an anti-Soviet organization")and Article 210 ("inveigling minorsinto criminal activity").SENTENCE: Seven years in a laborcamp and three years' internal exile.PREviOUS TERMS: None.CAMP ADDRESS:
431200
Mordovskaya ASSR -- Tengushevsky raion
pos.
Barashevouchr. ZhKh-385,'3-5documents, many of which also describean intensification of the government'scampaign against the Church and ib–adherents.it appears that this campaign is beingwaged on two basic fronts, the ideolo–gical, which engenders incessant propa–ganda through official governmentmedia organs and atheist institutions,and the punitive, which involves thepersecution of Church activists andclergy.in October 1982, two UkrainianCatholic priests, vasyliy Kavaciv. 49,and Roman Stepanovych Esip.
32,
wereeach sentenced in Lviv to five years'imprisonment and three years' internalexile under Article 209 of the Ukrai–nian Criminal Code, which makes it acrime to engage in actions "under theappearance of preaching religiousbeliefs." They were also charged with,"drawing minors" into such activitiesunder Article 208.The underground Chronicle of theCatholic Church in Lithuania, whichreported on the trial, said the two menadmitted they were priests but deniedcorrupting minors. The Chronicle saidthat the trial judge, P.O. Romaniuk,frequently ridiculed the faithful in thecourtroom, ordered their documentschecked and had them photographed.A later issue of the Chronicle des–cribed several KGB operations inwestern Ukraine aimed at intimidatingUkrainian Catholics and breaking upunderground churches, in one incident,which the Chronicle said took place inDobriariych, secret police agents andmilitiamen disrupted a religious gather–ing and rounded up believers, who werelater fined.in another incident, this one inMorshyn, a church was burglarized bystudents from a nearby vocationalschool, in the village of Berezhany,some 30 KGB agents reportedly attend–ed a town meeting sometime in !982andthreatened to close the local churchunless the people converted to RussianOrthodoxy, in leaving, the agentssealed up all the liturgical vessels in thechurch.The Chronicle also reported that justbefore Easter 1982,
KGB
agents sackeda church in the village of Brykunai,destroying icons and liturgical appoint–.ments. The attacked occurred duringworking hours, but several women whotried to intervene were reportedly badlybeaten, with some requiring hospitali–zation.But despite government harassment,Church activists have continued theirefforts to have the Church legallyregistered, in September 1982, aninitiative Group for thciDefense of theRights of Believers and the Church wasset up for that purpose. A brief letterannouncing the group's formation wassigned by Yosyp Terelia. a formerpolitical prisoner and Church activist.A memorandum was signed by Mr.Terelia and four other members, includ–ing Stefania Sichko, whose husbandand two sons are currently incarceratedfor "anti-Soviet activities."in the letter, Mr. Terelia said that theforced and illegal "union" of the Churchwith the Russian Orthodox in
1946
wasdone to benefit the "atheist-Commu–nist (system),"adding that despite threedecades of Soviet repression, theChurch, though underg^ewndi "is aliveand flourishing."^.''The Church^ictivists' attempts to'register the Church have met only with(Continued on page 13)2Sefe --,NEW YORK - The External Repre–sentation of the Ukrainian HelsinkiGroup recently released excerpts fromthe camp writings of Ukrainian dissidentpoet vasyl Stus, in which the imprisonedUkrainian activist writes about theconditions of the prisoners and alsocompares the Polish Solidarity move–-ment to the Helsinki groups in theSoviet Union.The complete text of his writings isscheduled to be published in the Suchas–nist journal.Mr, Stus, who was born on January8, 1938, had gained a reputation as atalented poet, literary critic and transla–tor by the early 1960s. However, he usedhis writing ability to express his concernfor the national and human rights of hisfellow Ukrainians being persecuted inthe mid 1960s, in 1965, risking hisreputation as a major poet, he beganwriting numerous appeals on behalf ofpersecuted Ukrainian intellectuals anddissidents.Since those years, Mr. Stus has spentmost of his time behind bars. He isserving a 15-year sentence he received in
1980.
Currently, he
is
serving the first 10years in a concentration camp in Perm,where he continues to actively defendpolitical prisoners.Mr. Stus mentions the followingprisoners in his camp notes: SemenSkalych, Y. Fedoriv, vasyl Kuryloand Oleksa Tykhy. He writes at lengthabout Mr. Skalych. Reading a pieceabout Mr. Skalych in a publicationtitled "Literaturna Gazeta," Mr. Stussays that he is mentioned
as a
Ukrainianpenitent, a martyr.At the age of 16 (in 1936), Mr. Stuswrites, Mr. Skalych contracted tubercu–
losis,
which left him an invalid, in 1945,the Bolsheviks sentenced him becausethey found a partisan brochure in hispossession.in "Literaturna Gazeta," Mr. Stusfound descriptions of Mr. Skalychwhich are, he says, "100 percent lies."He states that Mr. Skalych is a religiousman of a very conscientious character.Mr. Stus writes that Mr. Skalych isbeing persecuted for his religious con–victions. Seven hundred poems - thefruit of his thoughts about the world,faith, Christianity - were confiscatedfrom him. "1 did not see a greater crimeagainst a man in our labor camp thanthe one against Mr. Skalych," Mr. Stuswrites.Mr. Stus also writes:
"1
hope that thefate of this Ukrainian martyr willconcern all honest people in the world...Here is a man who survives without anyletters, without any money (not evenenough to buy himself a few products amonth), he survives with exceptionaldignity. Surrendering to God's will, heis sure that on this cross he will die. Buthe does not complain of
his
fate; for himit is beautiful, for he is a martyr for thefaith."Commenting on tue situation inPoland, Mr. Stus writes: "Poland setsan example for Ukraine (psychologically,we Ukrainians are close to the Poles,probably the closest, in our disposition)however, we lack that holy patriotismwhich consolidated the Poles. Oh, whata pity that Ukraine is not ready totake lessons from the Polish, teaqher."Unfortunately,
1
do not know whatimpressions the nations of the Soviet-Union got from (hesituation in Poland.The trade union version of liberationwould also be extremely effective (or thecountries of the Soviet Union.";
Senate Foreign...
(Continued from page 1)cent people, it was with very littlesupport that my father, CongressmanHamilton Fish, introduced a resolutionto focus public attention on the brutalacts of Stalin. Sadly, my father's resolu–tion did not then attract great interest,nor did it gain much support."He added: "1 believe it is most fittingthat your resolution proclaim May 28,
1984,
a national day to commemoratethe famine in Ukraine. As you know.May 28 will be the 50th anniversary ofthe introduction of my father's resolu–tion."S. Con. Res. 70 will now be placed onthe Senate calendar to await considera–tion by the full Senate. Since theresolution has attracted
62
co-sponsors,a majority of the Senate, and has beenapproved by the Senate Foreign Rela–tions Committee, favorable action bythe full Senate is considered likely.Although the Senate schedule is busyduring the last days of the session, theUAC hopes that the overwhelmingsupport for the resolution by membersof the Senate will convince the Senateleadership to call up the resolution forconsideration.The rapid movement of S. Con. Res.
70,
including the favorable reporting bythe Foreign Relations Committee lessthan six weeks after the resolution'sintroduction, is due in large measure tothe number of co-sponsors and thecontacts made with individual sena–
tors.
The UAC said it believes thatsupport from the entire UkrainianAmerican community was a majorfactor in this achievement.
Ukrainian Weelcl
FOUNDED 1933
Ukrainian weekly newspaper published by the Ukrainian National Association inc., a fraternalnon-profit association,
at
30 Montgomery St., Jersey City, NJ. 07302.(The Ukrainian Weekly
-
USPS 570-870)Also published
by
the UNA Svoboda,
a
Ukrainian-language daily newspaper.The Weekly
and
Svoboda:
(201) 434-0237, 434-0807, 434-3036
Yearly subscription rate:
S8, UNA
members
- 55.
UNA:
(201) 451-2200
Postmaster, send address changes to:
THEUKRAINIAN WEEKLY
P.O.Box 346
Jersey City. NJ. 07303Editor Roma HadzewyczAssociate editor George Bondan ZsryckyAssistant editor Marta Kolomayets
 
No. 46
THE
UKRAINIAN WEEKLY SUNDAY, NOVEMBER ІЗ, 1983
з
UABA establishes working committees,elects officers at annual meeting
CLEVELAND
- The formation of
several working committees devoted toUkrainian community service and theelection of executive officers and aboard of governors highlighted theseventh annual meeting of the Ukrain–ian American Bar Association (UABA)held here during the weekend of Oct–ober 14-16.Ukrainian attorneys from about adozen U.S. cities attended the con–vention, which was presided over byoutgoing president Bohdan Porytko.An Ad Hoc 1933 Famine Condemna–tion Committee, composed of Cieve–land attorneys Bohdan Futey, volo–dymyr Bazarko and George Orysh–kewych, wasЛ-harged with formulatinga resolution on behalf of
the
UABA thatwill be sent to the
U.S.
Congress and theUnited Nations.initial discussion focused on the factthat many of the famine commemora–tions staged by the Ukrainian com–munity in the past year did not lendthemselves to any specific follow-upactivity. A resolution passed at theannual meeting addressed this pointand specifically demanded that theSoviet government publicly acknowl–edge that it was responsible for theoccurrence of the 1933 famine thatresulted in 7 million deaths, that theSoviet government pledge to neveragain use artificial famine as an instru–ment of policy, and that the Sovietgovernment arrange for reparations tobe made to famine survivors and vic–tims'families.The attorneys' convention also rati–fied the establishment of the Commu–nity Dispute Resolution Committee inorder to examine the possible proce–dures for offering UABA members'services in the arbitration or mediationof Ukrainian community disputes.Appointed to the committee were Mr.Porytko, Petro Stawnychy and
Prof.
Walter Anastas.The UABA presented the newlyformed committee with an immediatetask. On September 15. the UABAexecutive officers had sent letters to!gnatius Billinsky, acting president ofthe Ukrainian Congress Committee ofAmerica, and John O. Flis, president ofthe Ukrainian American CoordinatingCouncil, offering the organizations theservices of UABA members to mediateor arbitrate the conflict between the twogroups, it was reported to the UABAannual meeting that the UABA had notreceived responses from either organi–zation, but that the UABA stands readyto work out a framework within whichdiscussions could be initiated.The Ukrainian American Bar Asso–ciation's continued concern about theuse of Soviet-supplied evidence indenaturalization proceedings beingBohdan Shandor (front, center), newly elected UABA president with (from left)Bohdan Porytko, corresponding secretary; Dior Rakowsky, vice president; PetroStawnychy, recording secretary; and Myron Gonko, treasurer.brought by the U.S. Department ofJustice was reflected in a report deliv–ered by ihor Rakowsky on the recentNew Jersey Federal District Courtdecision (U.S. vs. Kungys) in which thejudge ruled against the Justice Depart–ment's Office of Special investigationsand scored its use of Soviet-suppliedevidence in the trial.The annual meeting also screened thehalf-hour film "The Demjanjuk Trial:A Moment in History." produced by theJewish Anti-Defamation League of theB'nai B'rith, about a Cleveland-areaUkrainian American who is the objectof denaturalization procedures. Thefilm was purchased for reviewjointly bythe UABA and the Ukrainian AmericanProfessionals and BusinesspersonsAssociation. The discussion after thescreening was lively and resulted in aconsensus that the Ukrainian commu–nith, as a whole, was presented not(Continued on page 15)
1,500
in
Australia protest famine
CANBERRA, Australia - A crowdof more than
1,504)
Ukrainian dem–onstrators clashed with police outsidethe Soviet Embassy here on October 15during a march to commemorate the50th anniversary of the man-madefamine in Ukraine.The Sunday Telegraph in Sydneyreported that a middle-aged man col-lapsed and died of an apparent heartattack in the melee, it said severalpeople were detained by police after thecrowd tried to storm the embassy.At the height of the protest a smokegrenade was thrown, and the police hadto call in reinforcements, the paper said.The demonstration was part of aweekend famine commemoration,which attracted busloads of Ukrainiansand supporters.The protest started with a churchservice and then a march to ParliamentHouse where seven coffins - represent–ing the 7 million who died in the famine- were carried to the steps of thebuilding. The demonstrators then pro–ceeded to the embassy, many shoutinganti-Soviet slogans.On October 17, The Australian car–ried an editorial commenting on thedemonstration and on the famine.Headlined "Sad But Timely Reminder,"the editorial stated that the famineanniversary and the demonstrationbefore the Soviet Embassy have re-minded the world that it would be"irresponsible to ignore the fate of the.Ukraine as an example of what couldhappen to us if Soviet power wasoffered no resistance."
WCFU committee sets agendafor upcoming world conclave
300 attend Connecticut famine service
HARTFORD, Conn. - Nearly 300people, including Gov. William O'Neill,attended a memorial service for thevictims of the Great Famine in Ukraineheld here at the State Senate Chamberon September 29.The afternoon program, which washosted by State Sen. Joseph Harper,included opening remarks by Dr. Yaro–slav Turkalo, chairman of the Con–necticut Commemoration Committee,and the lighting of seven candles byareateenagers. Each candle represented 1million victims of the famine.After an invocation by Bishop BasilLosten of Stamford, the keynote ad-dress was delivered by Dr. James Maceof the Harvard Ukrainian Researchinstitute, who is researching a book onthe famine by Robert Conquest.Gov. O'Neill then delivered a briefaddress, and read his proclamationdesignating September 29 as UkrainianFamine Commemoration Day in thestate.Other speakers included Secretary ofState Julie Tashjian; Orest Dubno.commissioner of the Department ofRevenue Services;
Prof.
StanislausBlejwas, president of the ConnecticutPolish American Congress; and
Prof.
Michael voskobiynyk, president of theUkrainian Democratic Alliance, whosurvived the famine.The benediction was delivered by theRev. Jakiw Norton of St. Mary's U–krainian Orthodox Church in NewBritain, Conn.The commemoration committee alsoreceived a message from U.S. Sen.Christopher Dodd, who praised thecommemoration for preventing "raon–strous deeds like the forced starvationof the Ukrainian people from recur–ring."Later that evening. Dr. Mace,
Prof,
voskobiynyk and Dr. Turkalo wereguests on "The Peoples'Caucus,"a one-hour call-in show on Connecticut publictelevision. The program is hosted byBob Douglas, who is of Ukrainiandescent. A videotape of the show, whichis broadcast on Thursdays from 9 to 10p.m., will be presented to the HarvardUkrainian Research institute.TORONTO - The WCFU Organiz–ing Committee held its business meetingon October 18 and 19 to discuss theupcoming Fourth Congress of the WorldCongress of Free Ukrainians (WCFU)slated to be held from November 30 toDecember 4 in Toronto. WCFU Presi–dent lvan Bazarko presided at thesessions.Congress programThe WCFU congress will be held atthe Hilton Harbour Castle, 1 HarbourSquare (Lake Shore and Bay), with thefollowing agenda.a Wednesday, November 30: at 7:30p.m. official opening, greetings,election of committees.a Thursday, December 1: 9 a.m. -reports of executive organs, discussionand acceptance of reports, luncheon; 7p.m. - committee sessions." Friday, December 2: 9 a.m.addresses, discussion, luncheon, (sponsored by the government of the Pro–vince of Ontario); 7 p.m. — sessions ofcommittees.a Saturday, December 3: 1983, 9a.m. — reports of committees; electionof WCFU executive organs, adoptionof resolutions; 6 p.m. — banquet(cocktails at 6 p.m., dinner at 7 p.m.).a Sunday, December 4: 11:30a.m. -Mournful Manifestation at Maple LeafGardens (tickets: 58 and S10).SpeakersDr. Mykola Kushpeta, vice chair-man of the preparatory committee andcoordinator of the Fourtfi WCFUCongress, reported that Brian Mul–roney, leader of the Opposition, will bethe principal speaker at the MournfulManifestation.Other guest speakers at the congresswill be Stephen Terlecky. newly electedmember of the British Parliament, whowill speak both in Ukrainian-ahdEnglish about the 1932-33 famine inUkraine. Three other addresses will dealwith the millennium of Christianity inUkraine, the Russification of Ukraine,and the tasks of the WCFU for forth-coming years.Also planned are meetings of specialWCFU delegations with Ontario Pre–mier William Davis and Toronto cityauthorities.it was also decided to invite to thecongress as honored guests representa–tives of the world congresses of thePolish, Byelorussian, Lithuanian,Jewish, Latvian, Estonian, Slovak andHungarian groups. As well as diplo–matic representatives of the countriesfrom which Ukrainian delegates willarrive for the Congress.Special receptions will be arrangedfor delegates from South America,Australia and Europe under the spon–sorship of the Toronto branch of theUkrainian Canadian Committee.ManifestationOn Sunday, December
4,
there will beheld a Mournful Manifestation atMaple Leaf Gardens in memory of the 7million Ukrainian men, women andchildren who died during the famine inUkraine in
1932
and
1933.
The programwill include an ecumenical requiemservice lead by the clergy and hiexarchsof all Ukrainian Churches; the presenta–tion of colors by Ukrainian youth andveterans' organizations.The entertainment part of
the
Mourn–ful Manifestation will feature the unitedchoruses of Toronto under the directionof Zenovius Lawryshyn and the unitedyouth ensembles of young banduristsunder the leadership of Hryhory Ky–tasty.At the meeting it was decided topublish an updated English-langua;(Continued on page 15) ";

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