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The Ukrainian Weekly 1982-35

The Ukrainian Weekly 1982-35

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www.ukrweekly.com The Ukrainian Weekly was founded in 1933 to serve the Ukrainian American community and to function as a vehicle for communication of that community's concerns to the general public in the United States. Today the English-language newspaper publishes news about Ukraine and Ukrainians around the world; its readership, though mostly North American, is worldwide. The Ukrainian Weekly's editorial offices are in Parsippany, NJ; a full-time press bureau is located in Kyiv, capital of Ukraine. It is published by the Ukrainian National Association, a fraternal benefit life insurance society, based in Parsippany, NJ. Read more at www.ukrweekly.com

www.ukrweekly.com The Ukrainian Weekly was founded in 1933 to serve the Ukrainian American community and to function as a vehicle for communication of that community's concerns to the general public in the United States. Today the English-language newspaper publishes news about Ukraine and Ukrainians around the world; its readership, though mostly North American, is worldwide. The Ukrainian Weekly's editorial offices are in Parsippany, NJ; a full-time press bureau is located in Kyiv, capital of Ukraine. It is published by the Ukrainian National Association, a fraternal benefit life insurance society, based in Parsippany, NJ. Read more at www.ukrweekly.com

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Published by: The Ukrainian Weekly on Jun 12, 2009
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05/11/2014

 
\
Published
by the
Ukrainian National Association Inc.,
a
fraternal non-profit association!
rainian Weekly
ООЧ
oacn
Vol.
L
No.
35
THE UKRAINIAN WEEKLY SUNDAY, AUGUST 29,
1982
25 cents
Stus
awarded
poetry prizein
Rotterdam
meM
Vaayl StusROTTERDAM. Netherlands - Imprisoned Ukrainian dissident poetVasyl Stus was the recipient of
a
literaryaward recently bestowed by PoetryInternational, a poetry festival heldhere, which for the past three years hashonored poets who are persecuted intheir native countries.The award includes 10,000 Dutchguldens. In giving Mr. Stus the award,
the
jury indicated that it hoped to focusattention on the general persecution ofthe Ukrainian language and culture inthe Soviet Union.Mr. Stus is one of 24 Ukrainianauthors either in prison or in laborcamps, according to the Index onCensorship. He is currently serving thesecond year of a 10-year strict-regimecamp sentence to be followed by fiveyears in exile for "anti-Soviet agitationand propaganda."Mr. Stus, 44, who previously
served
alabor-camp and exile term from 1972 to
1978,
joined the Ukrainian group tomonitor Soviet compliance with theHelsinki Accords in 1979. He wasarrested and sentenced again in 1980.
SIDE:
Nina Strokata on the case ofіа Мукпзііепко — page 6.Dr. Myron Kuropas on youthand the Ukrainian community page 7.
Ш
International Plast Jamboreephotos - pages 8-9.
Ш
Uke-eye — page 10.
Ш
Ukrainian
pro
hockey update
page 11.
Plast
concludes international jamboree
by Maria KolomayetsEAST CHATHAM, NY. - Theofficial closing ceremonies of the International Plast Jamboree were held atmid-morning on Sunday, August 22.Marked by a divine liturgy celebratedby Bishop Basil Losten of Stamfordwith the assistance of Ukrainian Catholic clergy, the nine-day event held hereat Vovcha Tropa, ended in a spirit ofPlast brotherhood and unity.The liturgy was followed by a paradeof all jamboree participants past thereviewing stand, where representativesof worldwide Ukrainian organizations— among them the World Congress ofFree Ukrainians, SUM-A and ODUM— national organizations and Plastgroups active throughout the worldstood to watch the ceremonies. Theywatched as the flags representing thevarious countries where Plast exists,and the U.S., Ukrainian and officialflags of the jamboree were taken down,and as
the
eternal flame
was
extinguish
ed.
Embers from it will light
the
eternalflame that will burn at the next international Plast jamboree.Next came the presentations of citations to the best boys' and girls' Plastunits.With the final marching of the"plastuny" past the reviewing stand, theNorth American celebration of the 70thanniversary of the founding of Plastended.By afternoon, the clamor of youngvoices, the pounding of marching feet,the sound of
whistles
had become just amemory of the jamboree held August14-22.As the last buses pulled
out at
3
p.m.
totake the Plast members back to theirhomes in Winnipeg, Montreal, Toronto, Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland,Rochester and Buffalo, N.Y., andPhiladelphia, this phase of the celebration drew to
a
close. The youths had bidfarewell to their friends who had comefrom various other places includingNew York City, Los Angeles, Washington and several New Jersey cities andfrom such countries as Great Britain,Germany, Argentina and Australia,where Plast-also exists.As they were saying their goodbyes,plans were being made to meet againexactly a
year
from then (August 14-22)in Koenigsdorf, West Germany, the siteof the last phase of Plast's 70th anniversary celebration.The nine days of the jamboree hadflown by. It had started on Saturday,August 14, in the seven individualcamps: "novaky," "novachky," "yu-naky," "yunachky," "starshi plastuny,"seniors, and Plastpryiat and guests. Theofficial opening of the jamboree tookplace on Sunday, August 15, withLubomyr Romankiw, president of theInternational Plast Command, greetingall of
the
youths. After the reading of thefirst order of the day, the eternal flamewas lit by an Australian "plastun,"withembers brought from the AustralianPlast jamboree held in December 1981.This was followed by an ecumenicalmoleben concelebrated by Metropolitans Mstyslav Skrypnyk of the Ukrainian Orthodox Church and Metropolitan Stephen Sulyk of the UkrainianCatholic Church. Afterwards, thehierarchs celebrated liturgies for the"plastuny" and guests.On Monday morning, August 16, themajority of
the
Plast youths reappearedon the main
 field,
 however,
this
time notdecked out in their uniforms, butprepared for hiking, complete withbackpacks, tents, hiking boots, pocketknives, canteens and ponchos.School buses were waiting to takethem to their areas of camping. Theolder Plast youths piled into the busesfor three-day trips to the Adirondacks.The oldest groups later climbed Mt.Marcy, the highest point in New Yorkstate, rising
5,344
feet.The younger groups left for hikes onthe Appalachian Trail, which includedspending the night at Bobrivka, another
(Continued on pap 4)
ШВЯШЯШтт
Plast girls perform Kupalo traditions at jamboree.
 
2
THE UKRAINIAN WEEKLY SUNDAY, AUGUST 29,
1982
No.
35
Growing number of Polesseeking exit vises to West
WARSAW - Eight months afterthe declaration of martial law inPoland clamped down on the activities of the Solidarity free
trade
union,an increasing number of Poles, manyof them union activists, have appliedfor exit visas to the WestAccording to information compiled by 14 Western embassies inWarsaw and recently published inThe Economist, about 1,500 internees have inquired about emigrationfrom Poland for political reasons.Western diplomats expect that up to20 percent of the approximately
6,800
Poles interned under martiallaw will accept the Polish authorities'"invitation
"
to apply for passports tosettle abroad.So far only about 100 Solidarityinternees and their families havereceived exit visas to
go
to
the
UnitedStates and Sweden. In the next fewmonths, however, the number islikely to swell as more Westerncountries open their doors to let inhundreds of former internees andtheir families who have declared awish to start new lives in the West.Most of those who want to leaveare young Solidarity workers whosepolitical careers date back no earlierthan August 1980, when Solidaritywas born. Few if
any
of
the
600 or sotop Solidarity officials and veteranpolitical dissidents still detained are-expected to apply for permission to.emigrate.." Some of those still held in internment camps have reacted bitterly tonews that a number of Solidarityworkers have opted to leave Poland.The latter reply that they have noalternative. They complain, forexample, that
since
their release frominternment they have been underalmost constant surveillance bysecurity police, or prevented fromresuming their jobs.The Economist said that Polishminister of internal affairs, Gen.Czeslaw Kiszczak, has said that bymid-July passports had been approved for
6S3
released internees and1,058 members of their families. Butthe general claimed that until thenonly 21 persons had actually left thecountry and accused the Westernembassies of dragging their feet overthe issue of entry visas because theirgovernments wanted these people tobe "subversives" inside Poland.Since the Polish government announced in March that
it
would issuepassports to internees who wish tosettle abroad, Western governmentshave been in a quandry.
They
arguedthat forcing a person to choosebetween exile and continued imprisonment or political harassmentamounts to little more than forceddeportation.But the Western attitude appearsto
be
changing
in the
face of persistentreports from former internees aboutjob discrimination or other forms ofharassment.Because the Polish government isonly offering refugee status forpersons who were interned, severalSolidarity supporters who escapeddetention have reportedly tried tobribe local policemen to take theminto custody so that they would beeligible for exit visas, The Economistsaid.
N.Y. congressman expresses grave concernabout Horbal's "physical and mental" health
WASHINGTON - In
a
statement
in
the Congressional
Record dated
August
12,
Rep. Benjamin A. Gilman (R-N.Y.)said he was concerned about the "physical and mental health" of MykolaHorbal,
who
is
in
the second year of afive-labor-camp term in the SovietUnion.Mr. Horbal, a member of the Ukrainian group to monitor Soviet compliance with the 1975 Helsinki Accords,was arrested in 1979 on a fabricatedrape charge. The following year he wassentenced to five years in a labor camp.It was Mr. Horbal's second sentence.In 1970 he was sentenced to five years'labor camp and
two
years'internal exilefor circulating a poem
which
authoritiesdeemed "anti-Soviet.""Reports smuggled oat of Ukrainereveal that he has been physicallymistreated and is so depressed psychologically that he has even contemplatedsuicide," said Rep. Gilman.The congressman said that for thisreason he has notified Soviet Ambassador Anatoly Dobrynin asking theSoviet authorities to allow Mr. Horbalto emigrate to the West
Rep.
Gilman, a member of
the
HouseForeign Affairs Committee, also tookthe opportunity to accuse the SovietUnion of violating the human-rightsprovisions of the Helsinki agreement
by
persecuting the independent groups setup to monitor Soviet implementation.He said that the Ukrainian Helsinkigroup has been singled out "for particular harassment," and that the Sovietgovernment has ignored the Helsinkiprovision which
calls
for
a
nation's rightto self-determination.
Latvian priest found dead
ZURICH, Switzerland - A Latvianpriest missing since December 1981 wasrecently found dead in a wooded areanear the town of Daugavpils, raising to,12 the number of Latvian priests whohave died in the last year, reportedEast/ West News.Although
there
is
no evidence
thus
farto indicate foul play in the death ofAugust Zilvinskis, 59, another Catholicpriest was found murdered in the samearea last year.The body of Andrejs Turlajs, a vicar,
Report heavy Soviet
losses
after two Afghan ambushes
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - ThePakistan radio reported on August 22that Afghan guerrillas stormed a jail inAfghanistan's second largest city thismonth, killing 30 Soviet and Afghangovernment troops and destroying fourtanks, reported United Press International.The radio said that the guerrillas usedrocket launchers and Kalashnikovassault rifles in their predawn raid inKandahar, 250 miles southwest of thecapital of KabulAfter gunning down
30
soldiers at thejail, the guerrillas looted the prisonarmory and made off with 25 Kalash-nikovs and a heavy machine gun without suffering any casualties, the radiosaid.The radio suggested that
no
prisonerswere freed.In addition, a report by Reuters saidthat Afghan guerillas attacked a rallyattended by leaders and officials ofAfghanistan's ruling party in Pagman,nine miles northwest of Kabul, onAugust 19, according to Western diplomatic sources in New Delhi.One source, quoting diplomaticreports from Kabul, said several hundred people were killed or wounded inthe attack. The wounded are nowcrowded into two Kabul hospitals, thesource said.Reports from other embassies
in
NewDelhi spoke only of several casualties.
Ukrainian activistmoved
to
Russia
MOSCOW - Vasily Barats, a religious activist reported seized by thesecurity police on August 9 at Rovno inwestern Ukraine, has been moved toRostov on Don in southern Russia, hiswife said on August 23.The Associated Press reported thatthe woman, Galina Barats, said in atelephone call from Rovno that a citypolice official said her husband wastransferred on Saturday, August 21.She said the police had not told her whyMr. Barats had been arrested or why hehad been moved.A career military officer until hejoined a dissident Pentecostal group inthe early 1970s, Mr. Barats reportedlyheads a self-styled Committee forEmigration, which supports Pente-costals seeking to leave the SovietUnion.
Jews,
Slavs
to
mark Nazi invasion
DETROIT - In their first unifiedcommemoration of the Holocaust era,Polish Americans, Jewish Americans,and Ukrainian Americans will join onWednesday evening, September 1, inceremonies marking the invasion ofPoland on September 1, 1939.The event, which will take place at theMercy College of Detroit, StudentCenter Red Room, Outer Drive andSouthfield, in Detroit will be co-sponsored by the American Jewish Committee's Detroit Chapter; the Polish-American Congress, Michigan Division; St. Mary's College; the UkrainianCongress Committee of America, Metropolitan Branch; and the JewishCommunity Council of MetropolitanDetroit.Harold Gales, co-chairman of theAJCs Polish-American Task Force,and the meeting chairman, explainedthe reasons for
the
unified commemoration."The Nazi invasion of Poland," hesaid, "set in motion an inexorable chainof events that led to the horrors of theHolocaust. This tragedy, in combination with Russian imperialistic oppressive measures, inflicted ur eakablehorrors on millions of peopl
J.
"Poles, Jews, Ukrainians - eachgroup has sober reasons for reflectingon the events prior to and after Septem
ber. I,
1939. However, this September 1,
1982,
marks the first time that we haveorganized together to remember andresolve, in unity, that the agonies of thepast will not be part of the future as weproceed hopefully from suffering tounderstanding."Scheduled to address the meeting,
l
which is expected to attract hundreds ofresidents of Detroit and neighborhoodcommunities, are Xazimierz Olejarczyk,president of the Polish-American Congress, Michigan Division, and the Rev.Leonard Chrobot, president of St.Mary's College.Rabbi Irwin Groner of CongregationShaarey Zedek will deliver the invocation, and the Very Rev. BernardPanczuk, superior of the Basiln.nFathers, and pastor of the ImmaculateConception Catholic Church, willdeliver the benediction.was discovered
last
summer.
Prior
to
hisdeath, agents of the Soviet secret police,the KGB, had threatened him. Since
1980,
scores of priests were reportedlyassaulted and several murdered inneighboring Lithuania
in
what dissidentsources feel is a campaign of intimidation launched by authorities against theCatholic Church.With the spate of
deaths
in
Latvia, 10percent of the total Latvian Catholicclergy has been depleted.
Ukrainian Weekl
FOUNDED 1933
Ukrainian weekly newspaper published by the Ukrainian National Association Inc.,
a
fraternalnon-profit association, at 30 Montgomery St, Jersey City, NJ. 07302.(The Ukrainian Weekly
-
USPS 570-870)Also published by the UNA: Svoboda,
a
Ukrainian-language daily newspaper.The Weekly and Svoboda:
(201) 434-0237, 434-0807
(212) 227-4125Yearly Tubscriptjon rate: J8, UNA members
- S5.
UNA
(201) 451-2200(212) 227-5250
Postmaster, send address changes to:THE.UKRAINIAN WEEKLY
P.O.
Box 346
Jersey.
City, NJ. 07303'Editor Roma Sochan HadzewyczAssociate editor George Bobdan ZaryckyAssistant editor Malta KoJbmayats
fi
 
No. 35THE UKRAINIAN WEEKLY SUNDAY, AUGUST 29, 1982
3
Human-rights bureau assistant discusses
U.S.
policy strategy
WASHINGTON
-
Melvyn
Le-
yitsky, deputy assistant secretary
of
state
for
human rights
and
humanitarian affairs, said
in a
recent interview that
he
does
not
foresee
the
opening
of a
U.S. Consulate
in
Kievbecause,
in his
view, such
a
movewould be a "concession" in the face
of
the Soviet occupation of Afghanistanand
the
worsening situation
in Po
land.Mr. Levitsky made
his
remarks
in
an interview with Smoloskyp,
a
quarterly human-rights publication.A veteran
of the
foreign service,Mr. Levitsky,
44, has
served
as
firstsecretary
and
political officer
at the
U.S.
Embassy
in
Moscow. Prior
to
being appointed
to his
present position,
Mr.
Levitsky was the director ofthe Office
of
United Nations Political Affairs.In his new post, he is an assistant
to
Elliot Abrams, head
of the
human-rights bureau.In defining
the
bureau's approachto human rights worldwide,
Mr.
Levitsky said that
the
Reagan
ad
ministration
has
"placed great
em
phasis
on' the
civil
and
politicalliberties as
we
understand them in theUnited States."When asked about
the U.S.
position concerning the national rights
of
constituent ethnic groups
in the
Soviet Union,
Mr.
Levitsky said thathe
saw a
correlation between personal rights
and
national aspirations.He added that
the U.S.
government's role
in
addressing the nationalities issue
in the
USSR
is
primarilykeeping
"the
international spotlightfocused
on
Soviet practices
in
thisarea.""Now
we are not
naive
and we
don't believe
the
Soviet Union willchange
its
policies, which
it has
wellthought
out,"
said
Mr.
Levitsky."There
is a
reason
for
repressingnational rights.
It's
part
of the
general system
of
control that
the
Communist Party
and the
SovietPITTSBURGH
-
This year
the
University
of
Pittsburgh will
again
be
offering courses
in the
Ukrainian language. The department of Slavic studiesand literatures will offer ElementaryUkrainian
I and
Intermediate Ukrainian
III,
while
the
university's informalprogram, School
of
General Studies,will offer Ukrainian
I
(Elementary) andIntermediate Ukrainian.Following
are
course descriptionsand additional information concerningthe courses." Elementary Ukrainian
I
Introduces
the
student
to the
fundamentalsof four language skills, namely listeningcomprehension, speaking, reading
and
writing. Class sessions
are
organized
so
that
all
four skills
are
given time
to
develop
on an
equal level. Evaluation ofthe student depends
on
classwork,homework assignments, quizzes,midterm
and
final examination.
The
student receives four credits. Thiscourse meets twice
a
week.There will
be an
orientation meetingto determine
the
class schedule
on
Thursday, September 2,
at
5:30 p.m.
in
the Slavic Department Library, Room
117,
Loeffler." Intermediate Ukrainian
III -
Thisis
a
continuation
of
the first-year
(two
semesters, Ukrainian
I and II)
Ukrainian-language course.
It is
designed
to
develop competence
in
conversation,reading
and
writing skills begun
in the
Union pursues."International pressure,
he
said,may make
the
Soviets think twicebefore pursuing such policies
as
Russification
and
persecution
of
dissent, particularly
if
they understand that they stand
to
lose something.In the area of religious rights in theUSSR,
Mr.
Levitsky said that
the
view
of the U.S.
government
is
thatfreedom
of
religion does
not
exist
in
the Soviet Union.He vowed that
the
United Stateswould continue
to
press
the
Sovietson this question
at
internationalconferences
and
meetings such as theMadrid Conference
to
review implementation
of the 1975
HelsinkiAccords.Mr. Levitsky
did not
seem
to
holdout much hope
for any
substantialaccomplishments
in the
United
Na
tions, however."One
of the
unfortunate thingsabout the U.N. system is that it's verydifficult
to get a
wide range
of
support from other countries,
in
many cases, quite frankly, becausebargains have been made betweenthe Soviet Union
and
other countries,"
he
said.On
the
subject
of
Soviet expansionism,
Mr.
Levitsky said that
the
prevention
of
Soviet hegemony
has
been
"a
basic policy of virtually everyadministration."The Soviets,
he
said, seek
to
haveinfluence over other countries, particularly those that have control overtheir societies much
in the
same
way
the Soviet government does
at
home."They
do not
want
in the
SovietUnion independent centers
of
poweror control,
or
thought,
and in the
same
way,
they dont want theseindependent areas
to
exist
in
othercountries, because
it
would make
it
more difficult
for
them
to
deal with agovernment that
is
subject to popularexpression
or
popular pressure,"
be
said.In
the
Soviet Union, this basicapproach
is
manifested
in the go
vernment's Russification policies,
or
the eradication
of
indigenous ethniccultures
and
nationalities,
he
added.When asked whether
the
UnitedStates
has
traditionally backed emigration rights
in the
Soviet Unionwhile shying away from
the
largerquestions
of
national
and
religiousfreedom,
Mr.
Levitsky said
he did
not think that "there
has
been
a
lackof emphasis in this administration onthose liberties,"
but
added thatmatters
of
emigration
are
easier
to
settle than
the
other issues, particu-lary because the Soviet Union
is
"notgoing
to
reform... overnight.""It becomes really
a
matter
of
saving souls,
in the
sense that whilewe continue
to
urge that
the
SovietUnion respect human rights, since weknow
for the
most part that theywon't want to,
or
they won't,
we
haveto keep that valve open
so
that
at
least
a
certain number
of
people willbe able to get out,"
Mr.
Levitsky said.Mr.. Levitsky avoided comparingthe Reagan administration's human-rights policies with those
of the
Carter administration, which manyfeel
was
more vocal
in its
condemnation of human-rights abuses worldwide.
But
he
did say
that
the
Reaganadministration "would never accepta limitation
on our
ability
to
raiseissues with
(the
Soviets)."On
the
subject
of the
U.S. Consulate
in
Kiev,
Mr.
Levitsky
was
careful
not to
say that the administrationhas completely ruled
out the
possibility of opening the representation, buthe said emphatically that such a moveis unlikely until the situations
in Af
ghanistan
and
Poland
are
settled.Opening
the
consulate
at
thispoint,
he
said, "would
give
the wrongsignal"
to the
Soviets,
and
wouldlook like
a
"concession
on our
part."When asked
if
linking
the
consulate question with Afghanistan
and |
Poland was valid given the fact that aconsulate
in the
Ukrainian capitalwould
be a
disadvantage
to the
Soviets,
Mr.
Levitsky insisted thatthe United States must appear firmand consistent
in
its
dealings with theUSSR. "Firmness
and
reciprocityare very important,"
he
said.Asked how
far the
United States iswilling
to
push
the
Soviets intoreleasing
its
political prisoners,
Mr.
Levitsky responded
by
saying thatthe United States will continue
to
support
the
Helsinki process, whichhe said
has a
"great deal
of
valuebecause
it
holds
up a
standard.""And
I
think
the
forum itself
is a
very valuable forum...for discussingabuses
of
human rights,
and
makingprogress
in
that,"
he
said.
"And it
may have
a
greater value
in the
future."In discussing the decolonization ofthe Soviet empire,
Mr.
Levitsky saidthat
the
issue,
as
discussed
at the
United Nations
in the
broader context
of
anti-colonialism,
is
difficultbecause
the
United States
has ''not
had support
for
raising these questions under decolonization.""I think
it is
safe
to say
that
in the
last year, particularly
in
the last U.N.General Assembly,
we
began
to
raisethings about
the
Soviet Union withregards
to
national rights that havenever been raised before
in the U.N.
context,"
Mr.
Levitsky said.Mr. Levitsky also pledged
his
bureau's desire
to
work with nongovernmental human-rights' groupswith
the aim of
learning more abouthuman-rights abuses around
the
globe."And sometimes our own information
is
not as full as it might be and weneed
to
know about cases
of
abusesof human rights because,
as
IVe said,one
of
our policies is
to try to
exposethese
to
international attention,"
he
said.
"If
we don't know about them,this,
of
course,
is
impossible
to do."
Pitt to offer Ukrainian courses obituaryian courses
first year.
It
specifically aims
at
voca-,bulary building
and
extending
the
students' basic (kills. Evaluation: class-work, homework assignments, midterm
and
final examination. Prerequisite:Ukrainian
II or
equivalent. Thiscourse carries threecredits.Orientationis
the
same
as
Elementary Ukrainian
L
For further information contact
the
Slavic department,
120
Loeffler Building, University
of
Pittsburgh; telephone: 624-5906.e Ukrainian
I
(Elementary)
— The
informal program will offer
an
eight-'week course for beginners September 21to November
9.
Class sessions
are
organized that
all
four skills (listeningcomprehension, reading, writing
and
speaking) are given
time
to develop on anequal level. Each session consists
of
listening, reading, basic conversationand writing. There
will
be
no homeworkand
it is a
non-credit course.
Fee: S45.
Obituary
Wadym Lesytch, poet/critic
.13)
NEW YORK
-
Wolodymyr
Kir-
shak, poet, essayist, literary critic
and
publicist known under
the
pseudonymWadym Lesytch, died here Tuesday,August
24.
Mr. Kirshak
was
born
in 1909 in
Ukraine
and
studied
at the
universitiesof Cracow, Vilnius
and
Warsaw.His works were first published
in
1929 under
the
pseudonyms YaroslavDryhynych
and
Yaroslav
Yaryf.
He is the author
of
several collectionsof poetry, among them: "Sontseblysky"(1930),"Vidchyniayu vikno" (1932),"Rizbliu viddal"(1935), "Lirychnyizoshyt" (1953), "Poems" (1954)
and
"Predmetnist nizvidkil" (1972).In addition,
his
poetry
has
beenpublished
in
many Ukrainian literarymagazines,
and in
English
and
Germantranslations.Mr. Kirshak
was
a-member
of the
To
schedule Yale Ukrainian
course's
establish
a
class schedule amenable
to
all
the
participants
of
the course.Additional information concerningthe meeting
and the
course
may be
obtained
by
telephoning Michael
M.
Naydan
at the
Yale Slavic departmentat
(203)
436-8247,
or at
home
at (203)
562-6423.NEW HAVEN, Conn.
-
An organizational meeting concerning
the
Ukrainian .course
to be
offered
in the
fall
at
Yak University here will
be
held
on
Monday, September
6,
in.Room
08
(basement level)
at the
Hail
of
Graduate Studies
at 3:30 p.m.
The purpose of the meeting will be
to
Wadym
LesytchSlovo Association of Ukrainian Writers,the
PEN
Club,
the
Ukrainian PhilatelicSociety
and
other organizations.He authored articles
of
literarycriticism
and a
book of art criticism
on
Nykyfor
of
Krynytsia.The funeral
was to be
held Saturday,August
28,
from
St.
George UkrainianCatholic Church
in New
York
to St.
Andrew's Ukrainian Orthodox Cemetery
in
South Bound Brook,
N.J.
Surviving
are
wife Alexandra,
and
sons Ihor
and
Orest.

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