Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Nautical glossary for Morris v. West Hartlepool Navigation Co., Carroll v. U.S. Towing, and The T.J.Hooper

Nautical glossary for Morris v. West Hartlepool Navigation Co., Carroll v. U.S. Towing, and The T.J.Hooper

Ratings:

2.0

(1)
|Views: 39|Likes:
Published by George Conk
Nautical glossary for reading Morris v. West Hartlepool Navigation Co., Carroll v. U.S. Towing, and The T.J.Hooper
by George Conk, Fordham Law School
Nautical glossary for reading Morris v. West Hartlepool Navigation Co., Carroll v. U.S. Towing, and The T.J.Hooper
by George Conk, Fordham Law School

More info:

Categories:Types, Business/Law
Published by: George Conk on Aug 27, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

09/10/2013

pdf

text

original

 
Nautical Vocabulary
 for Morris v. West Hartlepool Steam Navigation Co., Carroll v. U.S. Towing, and The T.J.Hooper  North River: the one three blocks west of Lincoln Center, known outside thenautical trades as the Hudson River  bailee one who takes custody of property without ownership barge or lighter:A flat-bottomed freight-boat, chiefly for canal- and river-navigation, either with or without sails: in the latter case also called a lighter; in the former, as in the Thames barges, generally dandy-rigged, having one important mast.1769 FALCONER Dict. Marine (1789), Barge, is also the name of a flat-bottomed vessel of burthen, for lading and discharging ships.1846 GROTE Greece (1862) II. xx. 504 The merchandise was putinto barges. bargee: a barge-hand or crewman on a barge beam sea: the waves are coming from the side breakwater a structure, often made of stone, to protect an anchorage from weather ebb tide: the current on the falling tide. Opposite of the flood, or rising tide.fasts: lines that tie a boat/ship securely to something elsehold: a compartment below deck where cargo is stored coaming: a vertical edge around a gap in a deck to prevent water or objects from falling intothe gap in the deck (like around the hold)‘tween decks: a walkway located between two decks, here along the inside of the hullin ballast: cargo ships are designed to move through the sea when loaded with cargo. A shipin ballast has no cargo, only ballast. Such ships are higher out of the water and more likely to roll from side to side in a beam sea

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->