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The Ten Lepers.

The Ten Lepers.

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Published by glennpease
BY THE REV. JAMES S. M. ANDERSON, M.A.

CHAPLAIN IN ORDINARY TO THE QUEEN,



Luke xvii. 17, 18.

And Jesus answering said, Were there not ten cleansed ? but
where are the nine ? There are not found that returned to give
glory to God, save this stranger.
BY THE REV. JAMES S. M. ANDERSON, M.A.

CHAPLAIN IN ORDINARY TO THE QUEEN,



Luke xvii. 17, 18.

And Jesus answering said, Were there not ten cleansed ? but
where are the nine ? There are not found that returned to give
glory to God, save this stranger.

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Published by: glennpease on Aug 27, 2013
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THE TE LEPERS.BY THE REV. JAMES S. M. ADERSO, M.A.CHAPLAI I ORDIARY TO THE QUEE,Luke xvii. 17, 18.And Jesus answering said, Were there not ten cleansed ? butwhere are the nine ? There are not found that returned to giveglory to God, save this stranger.The incidents which attract our notice in the au-thentic histories of mankind, derive their chief in-terest and importance from the consideration, thatwe are beings endued with like passions with themen whose actions are narrated ; and that theirconduct is but a specimen of what our own often is,or might be, under similar circumstances. Henceit becomes not only an obvious but a needful em-ployment to look upon those narratives as monitorsand guides to ourselves.For, if the proper study of mankind be man, it isproper only so far as it may conduce to our ownTHE TE LEPERS. ^259advancement in righteousness, by making us ac-quainted with that weakness and corruption of ournature which self-love is for ever labouring to conceal.Should we forget to apply to our own individualcases, the observations which we make in the caseof others, our knowledge will not only be barren of improvement, but may even serve to engender acensorious spirit ; and increase that pride and pre^
 
sumption which we know too frequently attends themere possession of speculative knowledge. Ourown personal improvement is the centre towardswhich all reflections upon the nature and actions of man should converge ; and whatsoever tends to un-fold and bring to light any weakness lurking in theheart, should be received on our parts with all thereadiness and impartiality which becomes creatureswho are conscious of their responsible condition,and of that higher and eternal destiny which is tosucceed this probationary life. Under the convictiontherefore, that the Scripture from. which the text istaken is eminently calculated to conduce to thisend ; and that we may all derive from it a lesson^which, by God's blessing, may be profitable for ourinstruction in righteousness, I have chosen it as afit subject for our present meditation.We read that our blessed Lord, as He went toJerusalem, ^^ passed through the midst of Samariaand (jalilee. And as He entered into a certainvillage, there met Him ten men that were lepers,s2260 THE TE LEPERS.which stood afar off: And thej lifted up theirvoices, and said, Jesus, Master have mercy on us,"These lepers, observe, are described as meeting ourLord at the entrance of the village: for the lawof Moses had declared of every one afflicted withthat malady, that he ^'should dwell alone; andwithout the camp should his habitation be ^" Theywere shut out therefore from the abodes of theirfellow men ; and from the presence of all butthose who were oppressed like themselves, and likethemselves forsaken. They did not venture to draw
 
near even unto Jesus. Albeit they believed in Hispower to succour them, and confessed that belief intheir cry for mercy; yet they "stood afar off;" andfrom that distance lifted up their voices, with oneaccord, in the loud utterance of piteous supplication.Their posture was that of humility ; their languagewas that of faith. And^ if that humility and &athwere manifested in the hour of tribulation ; if theburden, which oppressed their feeble frames^ con-strained them to look more eagerly up to Him whogiveth health both to the soul and body ; if the in-sufficiency of human aid, and the helplessness of human suffering, led their hearts to trust in, andtheir tongues to implore, the help which comethfrom above, who will not say, that, in this very ap-plication, we have a living evidence of theuae and• . .1 .* Lev. xiii. 42. ?» .1THE TE LEPERS. 261purposes of affliction ? Does it not describe to us /the energy which affliction gives to our belief and toour hope ; the consciousness which it awakens withinus of the vanity of earthly comforts, — a conscious-ness which the world and the world's customs isfor ever striving to extinguish, — but which nevercomes home so closely and palpably to the heart,as when its positive reality is felt by us in the dayof trouble ?Yet this is not the main point set forth for

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