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6005105-sickle-cell-anemia

6005105-sickle-cell-anemia

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Published by: julialeo on Jun 12, 2009
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1
Sickle Cell Anemia

Sickle cell anemia is a disease passed down through families in which
red blood cells are an abnormal crescent shape. (Red blood cells are
normally shaped like a disc.)

Alternative Names
Anemia - sickle cell;
Hemoglobin SS disease (Hb SS);
Sickle cell disease
Causes

Sickle cell anemia is caused by an abnormal type ofh emoglob in called hemoglobin S.
Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells that carries oxygen. Hemoglobin S,
however, distorts the red blood cells' shape. The fragile, sickle-shaped cells deliver less
oxygen to the body's tissues, and can break into pieces that disrupt blood flow.

Sickle cell anemia is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. This means it occurs in
someone who has inherited hemoglobin S from both parents. Sickle cell disease is much
more common in certain ethnic groups, affecting approximately one out of every 500
African Americans. Someone who inherits hemoglobin S from one parent and normal
hemoglobin (A) from the other parent will have sickle cell trait. Someone who inherits
hemoglobin S from one parent and another type of abnormal hemoglobin from the other
parent will have another form of sickle cell disease, such ast h alass emia.

Although sickle cell disease is present at birth, symptoms usually don't occur until after 4
months of age. Sickle cell anemia may become life threatening. Blocked blood vessels
and damaged organs can cause acute painful episodes, or "crises." There are several
types of crises:

\u2022
Hemolytic crisis occurs when damaged red blood cells break down
\u2022
Splenic sequestration crisis is when the spleen enlarges and traps the blood
cells
\u2022
Aplastic crisis results when an infection causes the bone marrow to stop
producing red blood cells

These painful crises, which occur in almost all patients at some point in their lives, can
last hours to days, affecting the bones of the back, the long bones, and the chest. Some
patients have one episode every few years, while others have many episodes per year.
The crises can be severe enough to require admission to the hospital for pain control and
intravenous fluids.

Repeated crises can cause damage to the kidneys, lungs, bones, eyes, and central nervous
system.
2
Symptoms \u00bb
Common symptoms include:
\u2022
Attacks of abdominal pain
\u2022
Bone pain
\u2022
Breathlessness
\u2022
Delayed growth and puberty
\u2022
Fatigue
\u2022
Fever
\u2022
Jaundice
\u2022
Paleness
\u2022
Rapid heart rate
\u2022
Susceptibility to infections
\u2022
Ulcers on the lower legs (in adolescents and adults)
The patient may also have:
\u2022
Bloody urine (hematuria)
\u2022
Chest pain
\u2022
Excessive thirst
\u2022
Frequentur inat io n
\u2022
Painful erection (priapism; this occurs in 10 - 40% of men with the disease)
\u2022
Poor eyesight/blindness
Signs and Tests \u00bb
Tests commonly performed to diagnose and monitor patients with sickle cell anemia
include:
\u2022
Complete blood count (CBC)
\u2022
Hemoglobin electrophoresis
\u2022
Sickle cell test
Patients with sickle cell may have abnormal results on certain tests, as
follows:
\u2022
Amount of oxygen in the blood may be decreased
\u2022
CT scan or MRI may show strokes in certain circumstances
\u2022
Elevatedb ilirub in
\u2022
High serum creatinine
\u2022
High serum potassium
\u2022
High white blood cell count
\u2022
Peripheral smear displays sickle cells
\u2022
Serum hemoglobin will be decreased
\u2022
Urinary casts or blood in the urine
3
Treatment \u00bb

Patients with sickle cell disease need continuous treatment, even when they are not
having a painful crisis. Supplementation with folic acid, an essential element in
producing red blood cells, is required because of the rapid red blood cell turnover.

The purpose of treatment is to manage and control symptoms, and to try to limit the
frequency of crises.

During a sickle crisis, certain treatments may be necessary. Painful episodes are treated
with analgesics and enough liquid intake. Treatment of pain is critical. Non-narcotic
medications may be effective, but some patients will require narcotics.

Hydroxyurea (Hydrea) was found to help some patients by reducing the frequency of

painful crises and episodes of acute chest syndrome (which includes chest pain and
difficulty breathing). It also decreases the need for blood transfusions. There has been
some concern about the possibility of this drug causing leukemia, but as yet there are no
definitive data that Hydrea causes leukemia in sickle cell patients.

Newer drugs are being developed to manage sickle cell anemia. Some of these drugs
work by trying to induce the body to produce more fetal hemoglobin (therefore
decreasing the amount of sickling), or by increasing the binding of oxygen to sickle cells.
As yet, there are no other widely used drugs that are available for treatment.

Bone marrow transplants can cure the disease, but it is only recommended in a minority
of patients. This is mostly due to the high risk of the procedure (the drugs needed to
make the transplant possible are highly toxic) and the difficulty in finding suitable
donors. Also, bone marrow transplants are much more expensive than other treatments.

Antibiotics and vaccines are given to prevent bacteria infections, which are common in
children with sickle cell disease.
Additional treatments may include:
\u2022
Dialysis or kidney transplant for kidney disease
\u2022
Drug rehabilitation and counseling for the psychological complications
\u2022
Gallbladder removal (if there is significant gallstone disease)
\u2022
Hip replacement for avascular necrosis of the hip (death of the joint)
\u2022
Irrigation or surgery for priapism (persistent, painful erections)
\u2022
Partial exchange transfusion for acute chest syndrome
\u2022
Surgery for eye problems
\u2022
Transfusions or surgery for brain problems, such as strokes
\u2022
Wound care, zinc oxide, or surgery for leg ulcers

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