Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
2Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
The Ukrainian Weekly 1979-35

The Ukrainian Weekly 1979-35

Ratings: (0)|Views: 205|Likes:
www.ukrweekly.com The Ukrainian Weekly was founded in 1933 to serve the Ukrainian American community and to function as a vehicle for communication of that community's concerns to the general public in the United States. Today the English-language newspaper publishes news about Ukraine and Ukrainians around the world; its readership, though mostly North American, is worldwide. The Ukrainian Weekly's editorial offices are in Parsippany, NJ; a full-time press bureau is located in Kyiv, capital of Ukraine. It is published by the Ukrainian National Association, a fraternal benefit life insurance society, based in Parsippany, NJ. Read more at www.ukrweekly.com

www.ukrweekly.com The Ukrainian Weekly was founded in 1933 to serve the Ukrainian American community and to function as a vehicle for communication of that community's concerns to the general public in the United States. Today the English-language newspaper publishes news about Ukraine and Ukrainians around the world; its readership, though mostly North American, is worldwide. The Ukrainian Weekly's editorial offices are in Parsippany, NJ; a full-time press bureau is located in Kyiv, capital of Ukraine. It is published by the Ukrainian National Association, a fraternal benefit life insurance society, based in Parsippany, NJ. Read more at www.ukrweekly.com

More info:

Published by: The Ukrainian Weekly on Jun 12, 2009
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/11/2014

 
Ж
СВОБОДАJUSVOBODA
1
ішрвімилтй тшіціШш ЩЩг илш
ді
н ин
ОДНУ
LUcrainianWeekl
J^Bii'
ENGLISH-LANGUAGE WEEKLY EDITION
vOL.LXXXyi. No.
MO
THE UKRAINIAN WEEKLY SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER
2,1979
!
15 political prisoners support fight against Soviet Russian imperialism"
NEW YORK, N.Y. - Fifteen politi–cal prisoners of various nationalitiesincarcerated in the Soviet Union signeda document supporting the fight againstSoviet Russian imperialism and colo–nialism, reported the press service of theUkrainian Supreme Liberation Council(abroad).
.
Called the Second 10 Days of Soli–darity of nations in the fight againstSoviet Russian colonialism and imperi–alism, the action is a follow-op to asimilar event,held in the summer of
1978.
This year the 10 days were fromJuly 23 to August 1. Apparently the 10-day period, called "dekada" in theoriginal Russian text, is supposed tocoincide with the anniversary of thesigning of the Final Act of the Conference on Security and Cooperation inEurope or Helsinki Accords.The 1979 statement
was
addressed tothe secretariat of the Group 72, theMoscow and Ukrainian Helsinki moni–toring groups, U.N. Secretary GeneralKurt Waldheim, the 35th session of the
ЩШ
U.N. General Assembly, governmentsІ' which signed the Helsinki Accords, andall citizens of the free world.The document was written
and
signedby six inmates of the Chystopol specialprison: Razmik Zahrobian (Armenian),Anatoly Shcharansky (Jew), YladimirBalakhanov and Mikhail Kazacbko(Russians) and vasyl Fedorenko andYuriy Shukhevych (Ukrainians).it was co-signed by nine prisoners ofthe concentration camp near Sosnovkain Mordovia: Balys Gajauskas, Alek–sandr Ginzburg, Nikolai Yevhrafov,Sviatoslav Kraravansky, Lev Lukian–enko,Bohdan Rebryk, Oleksa Tykhy,Danylo Shumuk and Edvard Kuzne–tsov.Castigating the Soviet Union forbeing a "prison of nations" and for its"savage despotism," the political pri–
s
oners
called on the governments of thefree world, all political parties and theChurches "to firmly raise the questionof the liquidation of
all
forms ofnational and colonial subjugation -the inseperable companion of man-kind's final empire, the Soviet Russian
-
the prison of nations, which today,near the end of the 20th century, is the
Щ
KGB
steps up persecution of
Helsinki
monitor Malynkovych
NEW YORK, NY. - in an attemptto fabricate a case of anti-state activityagainst volodymy Malynkovych, theKGB late last year and early this yearstepped up
ІЦ
persecution of Malynko–vych and his family, reported the pressservice of the Ukrainian SupremeLiberation Council (abroad).According to the council's pressservice, Malynkovych, an cndocri–nologist and a candidate for a medicaldegree, is a member of the UkrainianPublic Group to Promote the implemcntation of
the
Helsinki Accords, it isnot known when he joined the groupbut his is the latest name
to be con–nected with the Ukrainian Helsinkiwatchers.
in
a
March
8
letter to Yuri
Andropov,chief of the KGB in Moscow, Malynko–vych detailed the suffering inflicted onhis family as a result of what he saidwere unjustified KGB searches andinterrogations.Malynkovych's apartment wassearched by four KGB agents on March6. He said that the search was orderedby Ukrainian KGB's chief investigator
Maj.
Slobozheniuk. but it was notauthorized by the prosecutor general.The search was conducted whileMalynkovych was on assignment with acommission of the Ministry of Health inChernihiv. The only persons at homewere his wife Halyna, his mother-in-lawMaria Hayle and two children, one ofthem
a
six-month-old
"daughter.The search was led by Maj. Hry–horyevsky, Senior Lt. Nakhratian andtwo other persons who did not sign thesearch report, said Malynkovych. Aswitnesses they used two persons wholive some distance away from the.Malynkovyches, he said in the letter."The reason for the search was toTind and confiscate items and docu–
ments
which are related to the case(which one?) cited the search warrant(the warrant
did
not
specify
which items
or documents
were
to
be
confiscated),'
"
wrote
Malynkovych.The search lasted from 5:45 p.m. to2:10 a.m. and the KGB agents left theapartment about 3 a.m.According to Malynkovych, amongthe items confiscated from him wereseveral photographs of Solzhenitsyn,his illustration based on one of thephotos, photos of Ginzburg, Galanskovand Dobrovolsky, clipplings fromBulgarian and Czecho-Slovak Com–munist newspapers, two bibles andother articels which are available to thegeneral public.His wife refused to sign the searchrecord and list of confiscated items onthe grounds that her husband was notpresent during the search.Malynkovych wrote that accordingto articles 177. 180 and 181 of theCriminal Code of the Ukrainian SSR.the search was conducted illegally.Malynkovych said that the articles
(CoatteMdoapaeceprincipal retarding force in the world'sdevelopment."One of the first points raised in theirstatement was the "suffocation of thenational liberation struggles of
the
non-Russian nations." in protesting againstthe deportations to the eastern-mostregions of Siberia, the prisoners de–manded to returned to their individualnative lands.The political prisoners declared
a
dayof silence on July 26 in protest againstnational discrimination. They objectedto the camp administration's refusal toallow them "to fraternize with thecamp's administration, personal and.business correspondence, to speak inlanguages other than Russian duringmeetings with family members, to readbooks, to listen to the radio, to watchmovies in the native language, toobserve national holidays and dates, tofoster their national customs andrhuals, to organize along nationallines."August 3 was designated by thepolitical prisoners as day to com–memorate a nation's right to decide itsown future. On that day the
15
politicalinmates marked the signing of theHelsinki Accords
by
"protesting againstthe brutal violation by the Sovietgovernment of Article УТІІ of thedeclaration of principles of the FinalAct and demanding the immediateimplementation of its most importantinternational principle concerning allprisoners of Soviet Russian colonialismand imperialism on the territory of theUSSR and beyond its borders."Their motto was'each of our nations"
в
our freedom."
r your
ana""
"However we realize that solidarityamong the captive nations
is
not enoughand we are therefore counting on thesupport and sympathy for our самеof all freedom-loving countries ohEarth, first of
all
from those whichrecently attained their independence,and the entire Third World as well
as
alldemocratic countries of
the
West," theywrote.Recognizing the importance of theannual Captive Nations Week obser–vances in the United States, the politicalprisoners requested the organizers ofthe CN events
"to
consider our 'dekada'as a call for continued growth andstrengthening."The political prisoners hope that the10 Days of Solidarity, become "a new
-
warning against the dangers to peace,and freedom for nations and people.''Writing that their reality is the!constant threat of becoming a statistic,denationalized and unified into oneentity called the "new historical com–munity of people -the Soviet nation,"the political prisoners warned thecountries of the world that "oar todaycould become your tommorrow" aadthat "civilization could be trampledunder the boots of the Kremlin's global:hegemony."They said that people "who respectlife, peace and freedom of their nations,have not a moment to lose."
Pope John Paul
to
visitUkrainian cathedral
in
Philadelphia
PHILADELPHIA,
Pa. -
Pope
John Paul H will visit the immaculateConception Ukrainian CatholicCathedral
on
Thursday, October 4,during his one-week
visit
to the UnitedStates, announced the Metropolitan'sChancery here on the basis of informa–
tion
received from Rome.
The pope
is scheduled to visit the
cathedral during
the
morning
of that
day.Ukrainian Catholic prelates, as wellas prelates of the Byzantine-RuthenianChurch, will participate in a meetingwith Pope John Paul at the cathedral.The Metropolitan's Chancery re-ported that further information aboutthe pope's visit and the celebrationsplanned in conjunction with it will bereleased in the near future.Spokesmen at the chancery notedthat the pope's willingness to visit theUkrainian cathedial indicates greatrecognition of the Ukrainian CatholicChurch in the diaspora.
Pope John Paul 11
 
THE
UKRAINIAN
WEEKLY
SIWDAY,
SEPTEMBER
2,1979
No.
200
'му
.
Tykhy criticizes kolkhozes
NEW YORK,
N.Y.
-
An article
by
Ofeksa Tykhy
in
which
he
comparesmodern-day kolkhozes
in the
ruralareas
of
Ukraine to the great latifundiaof the past,
has
been circulating
in the
iav, reported the press service ofcrainian Supreme Liberation
І
(abroad).
ГЖСВОУ
is a
founding member
of
the
"Kiev Public Group
to
Promote
the
lmtfj^jjentation
of the
Helsinki
Ac
cenfc tnd
is
now
serving
a
sentence
of
1.0 Saji' imprisonment
to
be
followedby five years' exile.
He
wrote the articleabbuY rural problems
in
Ukraine
in
response
to an
article which
had ap–
peared
in
"Literaturna Ukraine."Excerpts
of
the article appear below,"it
is
good
-
although, perhaps,several decades
too
late
-
that 'Liter–aturna Ukraine' has raised
the
questionof rural problems. These problems havetroubled
the
peasants themselves
for
a
long time,
it
is
with pain that they lookupon
the
desolation
of
the villages,
the
loss
of
the natural love
of
working
the
earth, and the downfall
of
morality andculture
in the
countryside.
A
largesegment
of
the Ukrainian intelligentsia(teachers, agronomists, zootechnicians,directors
of
kolkhozes and state farms)is
not
indifferent
to
these problems,because they
are
related
to
perpetualshortages
in
the
work force,
a
contin–uous decrease in the number
of
school-children,
a
decrease
and
sometimes
a
halt
to
cultural activity in clubs, prirai–tivism
in
the
life
of
kolkhoz members,state farm workers and
the
rural intelligentsia."Why does the village
(1 am
speak–ing only
of the
Ukrainian village,because
1 am not
familiar with
the
villages
of
other nations) grow old anddie out? Why
are
old and luxurious
new
buildings alike standing vacant
in the
villages?
Why
have many farms
and
small villages died? Why
has the
land,the village
which
for
ages
was
the
good, generous mother —changed intothe evil stepmother
from
whom childrenescape into servitude
to
the
city? Whydo people, especially youths, leave
the
native farmstead where everything
is
dear
and
familiar — often constructedby their very
own
hands
— and
go to
dormitories
to the
city where
for
fiveyears
not
even
a
visa
is
promised?"What would
the
great-grandfathersof today's 15-17-year-old great-grand-children think
if
they
saw
their lives?
(Continued
on
page
3)
fascism
and
communism
are
identical, says Malva Landa
NEW YORK,
N.Y. -
"Fascismand communism are identical pheno–mena," wrote Malva Landa,
a
mem–ber of the Moscow Helsinki monitoringgroup,
in a
statement
she
sent
to
Ludrailla Alekseyeva, the group's offi–cial representative
in
the West. Landa'sstatement
is
also circulating
in the
s^rnvydav.і Excerpts
of
the
statements, releasedhere by the press service
of
the
Ukraini–an Supreme Liberation
.
Council(abroad), appear below.:...l wish
to
repeat
my
assertions:ordinary fascism
and
ordinary com–munism (including the actual developedSoviet socialism)
are,
in
principle,identical phenomena.
, Both
have unrestrained opportunitiesto destroy people en masse,
and
this
was
ably demonstrated
in
practice,
(if, in
addition
to the
mass repressions
of
1930-1940,
one
would count also
the
many millions
of
people who died as
a
result
of
the artificial famine during theforced collectivization, during
the
liquidation
of the
kulaks
as a
class,during
the
mass deportations
of
entirenations, during
the
occupation
and
deportation
of
the
populations
of
the
Baltic areas and others, then, obviously,the Soviet Union surpassed even Hitler's Germany by
a
significant margin.)They are similar also
in
their hatredand coercion (directed against foreignnations, ideologies and classes), intoler–ance of free thought and expression;
in
principle they
do not
recognize, do notrespect human rights... Communistideology
and the
communist regime,especially
the
Soviet,
are
marked
by
much greater hypocrisy (through greatart they mask themselves with human-
ism"),
more falsehood
and
unlimitedpossibilities
for
falsification...The actual development of socialism,which claims to be
a
model for
the
greatfuture
of
all mankind
-
roots out andsnatches away from society
its
bestrepresentatives, those who regardless ofeverything remain themselves, expresstheir capability
to
think independently,preserving
and
strengthening withinthemselves moral values created
by
mankind...Real socialism,
as a
social system,promotes atrophy
of
those most impor–
(Coatiaaed
oa
page
3)
Soviets comment
on
vins's Church
Rumanians Silent on incarcerated priest
KESTON, England.
-
"The
massmedia of a number of
Western
countriesoften mention the name of Georgi vins,a former preacher of a Kiev EvangelicalChristian-Baptist congregation who hasserved
a
sentence
of
imprisonmentimposed
by the
Kiev regional court
for
the crimes
he
committed."Thus begins an article in the June
15
issue
of
the Soviet publication "GolasRadzimy" (voice
of
the
Motherland),intended
for
Byelorussians livingabroad.
The
article
attempts to discreditPastor vins
by
writing
of
the freedomenjoyed by the church of
which
he was a
leader
and of
which
his
family weremembers until they were allowed
to
emigrate
to
the
United States
in
June,reported
the
Keston News Service.The paper's correspondent describesa visit in May to
a
communion
service
ofthe Kiev "lnitsiatyvnyky" Church whenhe spoke
to the
pastor, Nikolai
Ye
!ichko, and the chairman
of
tfie churchcouncil, Stepan Tsyganyuk. velichko,
a
42-year-old graduate engineer, reortedthat the congregation had
600
members.His wife and three school-age childrenwere present at the service
and
all attendregularly. Apart from explaining
the
communion service, velichko
seems
notto have said anything else to the corres–pondent.Tsyganyuk, however,
is
quoted moreextensively.
He has
been
the
chairmanof
the
church
council since
1975 (it
is notmentioned that
the
church
was
unre–gistered,
and
therefore illegal, prior
to
1975).
He
spoke
of
the
separation
of
Church and state which, he said, meansthat there
is no
interference
by the
authorities
in
the internal affairs
of
thecongregations.. Church income
is not
taxed
and
is
spent
as
the congregationdecides,
in
1975,
for
example,
the
congregation paid
for the
constructionof a church building.The correspondent asked about Wes–tern comments
on the
isolation
of
the
"lnitsiatyvnyky" from Soviet society,persecution
of
their churches
and
the
desire
of
some members
to
emigrate.Completely ignoring
the
question
of
(Contomed
on
page
13)
Report existence
of
secret seminary
in
Lithuania
KESTON, England.
-
According
to
the Lithuanian underground journal"Perspektyvos"
the
existence
of an
underground Catholic seminary
was
hinted
at
during
a
press conferenceorganized
by
Lithuanian dissidents
for
foreign journalists
in
vilnius
on
Feb–ruary
10.
Two young
men who had
tried
to
enter
the
official seminary
in
Kaunastold journalists that the KGB interferedin
the
annual selection
of
students,forcing the Church authorities
to
rejectthe majority
of
applicants. Those
who
are regarded as potentially hostile to theSoviet regime
are
crossed
off the
list.The authorities try
to
ensure that thosewho eventually graduate
and
becomepriests will
be
loyal
to the
Soviet state.Every applicant
and
student
is at
sometime summoned by the KGB and askedto "cooperate"
by
supplying informa–tioa on the other students
and
staff.
Тікwork
of
the
seminary
is
almost para–ryzed
in
this manner, according
to
the
news service
of
Keston College.However,
one
of
the speakers statedthat there were about 15 undergroundpriests,
who
have been secretly trainedand ordained,
and
that there
had
beenan increase
in
the
numbers being sec–retly trained
for the
priesthood.
"You
are
no
doubt aware,"
he
remarked,"that
the
present pope also studied
at a
secret seminary
in
Cracow during
the
German occupation.
Why
shouldLithuanians
not
follow
his
example?"The believers hoped that
the
under-ground theological courses would forcethe government
to
increase
the
numberof students
at
Kaunas seminary,
but
fear
was
also expressed that
the
KGB
would prefer
to
infiltrate
or
discredit the"unofficial" courses
and
secretly or–dained priests,
if
priests like Jaugeliscan
now
publicly appear
at
services,KGB power over seminarists
is
threa–tened
and
state apparatus could
be
avoided.The 'HThrooicle
of the
Lithuanian'Catholic Church," (No.
37)
sees
the
(CoaUaaed
oa page
U)
KESTON, England.
-
Rumanianbelievers designated August
26 as a
dayof fasting and prayer
for
those in theircountry suffering
for
their faith. Thiscomes
at
a
particularly critical
 time
 for
Rumanian Christians.in a report reaching Keston College,ah eyewitness states that the Orthodoxpriest. Father Gheorghe Calciu Dumitreasa, arrested on March 10, is in poorhealth
in a
Bucharest prison:
"His
bloodshot eyes, pallid face and drasticloss
of
weight were an indication of thepoor treatment
he
has
received duringthe past four months
of
his imprison–ment.
it
appeared that
he
had
not
beenallowed
in the sun
during
the
entiretime."A conspiracy of silence on the part ofthe Rumanian authorities
has
markedthe treatment
of
Father Calciu. Despitethe savagery
of
his recently announced10-year prison sentence,
the
chargeshave
not
been disclosed.
His
wife
was
finally allowed
to see
him for the
firsttime on June 12, three months after hisdisappearance. She is to be allowed onevisit every
six
months
and may
takeonly
one five-kilogram
 parcel per visit.Dimitrie lanculovici,amemberoftheRumanian Christian Committee for theDefense
of
Religious Freedom
and
Freedom
of
Conscience arrested
on
June
6
for
"parasitism,"
has
been givenheavy labor detail
in the
TimisoaraPrison despite
ill
health which pre–vented him from serving
in
the army. Hehas
to
meet certain quotas each
day
regardless
of
the time
it
takes
to
do so.When
not
working,
he is
subject
to
interrogations. His wife does not have
a
job and, thus
has no
means
of
supportfor herself
and
their three children.
She
gave birth
to
their youngest child onlytwo days before her husbnd's arrest.
At
his trial neither
a
defense lawyer, friendsnor relations were allowed
to be
pre–sent.Nicoiae Bogdan,
age 20,
anothercommittee member arrested
for
"para–sitism,"
was
recently beaten
in
prison.He suffered
a
broken arm and lost twofront teeth. His mother almost failed
to
recognize
him on a
recent visit
to the
prison.
His
bruises
and
gashes werecovered with dirty bandages.Gheorghe Budusan,
an
Orthodoxbeliever recently released after serving
a
five-month prison sentence
for
"para–sitism,"
has
experienced constantthreats.
Two men
forcibly picked
up
Budusan's children
on
their
way to
school and told them they were going tokill their father. They warned
the
children
not
to
tell their father
or
theywould suffer the same fate. The incidentterrified
the
children
but
they
did
telltheir father. As yet, the men have failedto carry
out
their threat.Faced with such cases, Father Cal–ciu's appeal
to
"Free Man"
on
Novem–ber
14,
1978,
takes
on
new
relevance:"Why do good men remain
silent?..
We
want you
to
feel with us in our sufferingand cry out when
we
cannot: 'Enough.'"
CBOBOMmSYOBODA
УКРАЇНСЬКИЙ
ЩОДІННИК
4HRP
HUlUlU'Ulll
FOUNDED
1893
Ukrainian
newspaper published
by
the Ukrainian National
Association,
inc., at 30 Montgomery
Street
Jersey City, NJ.
07302,
daily except Mondays
and
holidays.
TELEPHONES:
UNA
(201)451-2200
from
New
York
(212)
227-5250
(212)
227-5251
Svoboda
(201) 434-0237(201) 434-0807
from
New
York
(212)
227-4125
Subscription
rates
for
THE UKRA1N1AN WEEKLY
UNA
Members
S6.00
per
year
І250
per
year
THE
UKRAINIAN WEEKLY
P.O. Box 346. Jersey City, NJ. 07303
Editors:
Zenon Snylyk (Managing)
"Roma"
Sochan-Hadzevrycz
 
No.
200
THE
UKRAINIAN
WEEKLY
SUNDAY,SEPTEMBER2,1979
Report new Russification campaign
Ukrainian rights advocates intimidated by KGB
Malynkovych
and
Bilorusets
are
close friends
of
Petro vim, the youngestmember
of the
Ukrainian Helsinkigroup who
is now
residing in the West.Malynkovych,
39, is
married and thefather
of two
children.
A
resident
of
Kiev, Malynkovych
is a
radiologist.
He
is employed
at the
institute
of
Endo–crinology
and has
written over
40
research papers.NEW YORK,
NY. -
A new massiveRussification campaign
is
directed
at
the very existence
of the
non-Russiannations
in the
USSR,
a
message fromthe Lithuanian underground asserts.The message accompanies official
So–
viet documents and appeals
to the
worldto focus
its
attention
on the
"crudeviolation
by the
Soviet Union
of the
human right
to
communicate
and to
learn
in
one's native language," report–ed
the
ELTA information Bulletin
of
the Supreme Committee
for
Liberationof Lithuania.One document, taken from
the 10th
issue
of the
Lithuanian samvydavjournal "Perspektyvos" contains
ex
cerpts from the draft recommendationsto
the
conference
on
"Russian
— The
Language
of
Friendship
and ,
Colla–boration
of
the Peoples
of
the USSR."The conference, devoted
to
the teachingof Russian
to
non-Russians, was held inTashkent, Uzbek
SSR, on May
22-24.Also enclosed
are the
texts
of two
directives from
v.P.
Elyutin, USSRminister
of
higher
and
secondary spe–cialized education, requiring moreintensive study
of
Russian
at the ex–
pense
of
other parts
of
the curricula,
as
well
as
similar measures.The message
of the
Lithuanianunderground informs that
the
texts
of
the recommendations were receivedfrom Moscow
in
March
and
have beenlocked
up in the
safes
of
several officesin Lithuania.
The
employees
are not
allowed
to
see the actual photocopies ofthe recommendations,
on
which
the
names
of the
senders
and
signers
are
covered. "There
is
talk that
the
recom–mendations
saw the
day-light with
L.
Brezhnev's consent."in recent years,
the
message con–tinues,
the
Russification campaign
has
been "particularly intensified":
all
schools, from kindergartens to uni verst–
ties,
are to be
transformed into "chiefcenters
of
Russification."
The
directivesrequires that
"all
forms
of
teaching
be
increasingly performed
in
Russian."Analogous directives are issued also
by
the ministries
of
the national republics.According to,the message,
the pur-
pose
of the
Tashkent conference
has
been
to
"show that
the
citizens
of the
national republics allegedly support theRussification policy conducted
by the
Communist Party
and
government. Thegovernment
of
the tsar used
to do
thisopenly
and
directly,
but the
presentrulers wish to
give
the appearance that
it
would be accomplished with
the
citi–zens'
own
hands."The recommendations consist
of an
introduction
and
seven parts, whichcover prc-school education, non-Rus–sian-language schools, trade
and
tech–nical schools, methods for
the
improve–ment
of the
qualification
of
Russian-language teachers,
and the use of
massmedia
for the
teaching
of the
Russianlanguage.in
his
message
of
greetings
to the
participants
of the
Tashkent confer–ence, Brezhnev spoke
of
the emergenceof
a "new
historic community
- the
Soviet people (among whom)
the
Rus–sian language objectively plays
an
everincreasing role
in the
creation
of
com–munism
and in the
edcuation
of a new
man."
The first secretary
of the
UzbekCommunist Party.
Sh.
Rashidov,
a
notorious champion
of
Russification,extolled
the
Russian tongue
in his re-
port
as the
"language
of a
giant
na
tion that possesses very rich democraticand revolutionary traditions
and an
unusually advanced culture."
He
saidthat
the
"role
of
the Russian languagewas expanding under mature socialism"and that this process
was
conditionedby the "florishing
and
drawing closer ofnations." Rashidov exulted about
the
first data
of the
1979 all-union census,which indicated that
the
number
of
"individuals
of
non-Russian nationali–ties
who
were considering Russian
as
their native tongue
or as a
secondlanguage
was on the
increase."
-
M. Prokofiev, USSR minister
of
education, emphasized that
a
"har–monious system
of
studying
a
secondlanguage...must start
in the
prc-school
age."
Fascism
and
communism...
(Continued from page
2)
tanf human attributes; that
is, it
dehu–manizes
man and
society.Liberalization
is
incompatible withthe structure
of
real socialism;
it is
contrary to its essence,
(it
may be easierto retrain
a
wolf to be a good dog, thanit would
be to
liberalize socialism.)But, each attempt
at
forced changemay lead only
to
the modification of thesystem
in the
direction
of
even greatercruelty,
or to
the emergence
of
another,less cruel totalitarian regime.We are our system. The only hope forchange
for the
better (that
is, the
replacement
of
real socialism
by a
liberal democratic system suitable
for
further improvement)
is
changewithin ourselves.To think independently, to have one'sown beliefs
and to
freely express thesebeliefs
-
such behavior (ideologicalnon-conformity)
is
accepted
in
the Landof
the
Soviets
— not
only
by the
authorities,
but
also
by the
ordinarySoviet citizen
(a
considerable segmentof
the
citizenry, regardless
of
socialstatus, education
and the
like
)
as a
serious crime, worse than murder,violence, robbery...Moral opposition truly underminesand shakes
the
foundations,
the
struc–ture
of
real Soviet socialism.No liberal-thinking persons eventhought
of
condemning those
who
morally oppose fascism. However,these persons, or at least
a
considerablenumber
of
them, fall into a panic aboutideas
of
moral opposition
and,
there-fore,
the
undermining
of
real Sovietsocialism....To find within oneself courage andthe strength
to
independently see, hear,know, understand
(to
remember whatthe deceased were,
to
remember whatthey
are
today...) think.
To
find withinoneself courage
and the
strength
to be
honest with oneself
and
one's closefriends.
To
renew within oneself aware–ness,within the soul
-
a system
of
highmoral values...To have
the
courage,
at
least partially,
not to
live through lies.Obviously, true adherents
of
socialisticor other various totalitarianisms wouldthen wind up–
in the
minority.
By the
way,
the
system —
the
system,
and not
specific candidates
would then losethe elections...Obviously, this is impossible. And
we
will remain
in
the wolfs pit of socialism-communism.But,
as
long as a human being iives
-
he cannot
not try to
remain
a
humanbeing. Perhaps
it is
precisely because
of
this that there
are
dissidents
in
thiscountry, obviously their number
-
regardless
of
continuous
and
evenincreased persecutions, repressions
and
banditry inspired by the authorities
- is
always growing.NEW YORK,
N.Y. -
The KGB
has
resorted
to
muggings and beatings in
its
campaign
of
intimidation againstUkrainian human rights activists,
re-
ported the press service
of
the
Ukraini–an Supreme Liberation
.
Council(abroad).On June
16
Marko Bilorusets,
36,
was threatened with arest
if he did not
cease
his
human rights activity. Laterthat evening Bilorusets
was
attackedand beaten near
his
home
on the
Khreshchatyk Boulevard
in
Kiev.Bilorusets
is a
construction engineer.A bachelor^ Bilorusets.is also known
for
his translations
of
German prose
and
poetry into Ukrainian
and for
translat–ing the works
of
the
Austrian poet PaulCelan.
At one
time
his
works werepublished
in
the journal "vsesvit."On August
1
Bilorusets
was ob–
scrving
his
birthday
and one of his
guests, volodymyr Malynkovych,
a
member
of the
Ukrainian Helsinkigroup,
was
beaten
en
route
to
Biloru–sets's home.
The KGB
apparentlywaited
for
Malynkovych
in the
court-yard
of
Bilorusets's home. Malynko–vych was then arrested and detained
for
15 days.
UCC officers meet Schreyer
W1NN1PEG,
Man. -
Rcpresenta–tives
of
the Ukrainian Canadian Committee headquarters met. here withEdward Schreyer, governor general
of
Canada,
on
Thursday, August
9.
The representatives were
Dr.
SergeRadchuk,
UCC
president;
А.І.
Yare–movych, general secretary;
and Dr. S.
Kalba, executive director.The
UCC
representatives broughttwo books
for the
Schreyer children:the English-language
"Fox
Mykyta"with illustrations
by
William Kurelekand
a
book
of
Ukrainian tales.
The
Flying Ship" ("Letiuchyi КогаЬеГ)with illustrations
of
Winnipeg residentPeter
Kuc.
Tykhy criticizes...
(Continued from page
2)
Could they have wished such
a
fateupon them when they first joined
the
kolkhoz? They thought that
the
landwas ours, that the products
of
our workwere also ours; that we lived poorly, butour children
and
even more
so our
grandchildren
and
great-grandchildrenwould live better lives, perfectly goodlives.That
is,
they would work less,would consume more
and
better
pro-
ducts
of
their labor,
for
their work
on
the blessed land covered with the bloodand sweat
of
many generations
of our
ancestors they would have
the
oppor–tunity
to
buy more and better consumergoods, would gain knowledge, wouldlive
not
only
by
daily bread,
but
wouldmultiply
and
would rejoice over theirgood fortune. What would they
(the
great-grandfathers) see?" asked Tykhy.They would
see, he
wrote, "that theirchildren
and
grandchildren live
out
their lives
in
loneliness
on
pensions
of
12-18 'karbovantsi'
per
month withouttheir children
and
grandchildren
who
have moved
to
various parts
of the
USSR, with the one hope that perhaps
a
son
or
daughter would take them
in,
after they
are no
longer
able
to
walk,
to
their two-room apartment
on the
fifthor ninth floor where
you
cannot
see
either
the
clear, blue
sky or a
tree
or
woods,
you
cannot hear
the
singing
of
boys
and
girls
as it
once
was,
cannothear the customary barking of dogs
or
a
concert
of
frogs. Only
the
walls
and a
blue screen which it
is
not uncommon
to
see
in the
village."Tykhy also noted that
the
great-grandfathers would
see
that their
de–
scendants
are
working
not
less,
but
more than they used
to
work, that thereis work
for
everyone from dawn untildusk
and
even during
the
night."And
for
what? What
is the
outlookfor them?
And
will there
be an end to
such work,
if not for
them, then,perhaps
for
their children or grandchil–dren? There
is
no end
in
sight.
There
areno indications that
in the
future
it
willbe different..." Tykhy wrote."Until
the
revolution, duringpoverty-stricken life, there were largefamilies,
the
villagers believed
in a
better fate
and in
their own capabilitiesto improve
the
economy
and to
live
as
other people do. Today there is no morehope,
the
villagers
do not
considerthemselves masters
of the
land
and of
the products
of
their labors, they do notbelieve
in the
better fate
of
their chil–dren. That
is
why they are fleeing frAnthe villages, sending their offspring
to
the cities for suffering
and
distress. Withgreat pain they send
off
girls, because inthe city mockery, rape, temporarymarriage, (that
is the
idea
the
villagerhas
of
the
city,) hard work
and a
foreignlanguage await them. But they send heroff anyway, because what awaits her athome
in the
village? Some boys marrysomewhere
far
away where they
are
serving
in the
army, others flee
to the
city. What fate awaits
the
girl? Heroicwork
on the
farm
or in the
field
and
eternal girlhood...And
who is
captiv–ated
by
such
a
fate?"Often people speak and write aboutthe village catching
up
with the city.
І
donot understand what there
is to
catch
up
to.
if the
guarantee
of
products
and
goods
is
what
is
meant, then
it is
not
a
matter
of
catching
up, but a
matter
of
ending discrimination against
the
vil–lage.
in my
opinion,
it is the
city,
in
many cases, that should catch
up to the
village (morality, preservation
of
tradi–tions
and
culture
of the
nation,
as
wellas
the
most valuable treasure
-
lan–guage)"instead
of
catching up, wrote Tykhy,the peasant should
not
be forced to giveeverything that
is
better
and
morevaluable
to the
city,
but
should makeuse
of it
himself;
village stores shouldreceive
all the
goods that are necessary,not only those that are not needed
in
thecity;
the
peasant should
not
have
to
travel
to the
distant (cultured) city
to
buy bread, meat, watermelon
or cu–
these goods
in his own
village,
and not
at
the
city price
but at the net
cost,
for
this
is the
product
of his
labor,
his
sweat,
his
blisters; the peasant should
be
paid
for his
work whatever
is
reallyappropriate according
to his
physicaland mental work,
and not
whatever
is
left over after paying taxes, wages
of
superiors
and
government fees;
the
peasant should
not be
attached
to the
land
or
kolkhoz for eternity, but shouldbe able
to
become independent
if
this
is
what
he
thinks
is
best,
to
organize
or
join
a
smaller kolkhoz
and the
like."Today's kolkhozes remind
one
verymuch
of the
great latifundia,
and the
peasants
common workers
on-–
theffl...." Tykhy wrote.:
,, . v --vvy
-Л'Л'.
'
OCfiX
"tr)
?y,n-Q.
гичп

Activity (2)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->