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Table Of Contents

P. 1
In a Dry Season

In a Dry Season

Ratings:

3.85

(262)
|Views: 2,132|Likes:
Published by HarperCollins

In the blistering, dry summer, the waters of Thornfield Reservior have been depleted, revealing the ruins of the small Yorkshire village that lay at its bottom, bringing with it the unidentified bones of a brutally murdered young woman. Detective Chief Inspector Banks faces a daunting challenge: he must unmask a killer who has escaped detection for half a century. Because the dark secret of Hobb's End continue to haunt the dedicated policeman even though the town that bred then has died—and long after its former residents have been scattered to far places . . . or themselves to the grave.

From an acknowledged master writing at the peak of his storytelling powers comes a powerful, insightful, evocative, and searingly suspenseful novel of past crimes and present evil.

In the blistering, dry summer, the waters of Thornfield Reservior have been depleted, revealing the ruins of the small Yorkshire village that lay at its bottom, bringing with it the unidentified bones of a brutally murdered young woman. Detective Chief Inspector Banks faces a daunting challenge: he must unmask a killer who has escaped detection for half a century. Because the dark secret of Hobb's End continue to haunt the dedicated policeman even though the town that bred then has died—and long after its former residents have been scattered to far places . . . or themselves to the grave.

From an acknowledged master writing at the peak of his storytelling powers comes a powerful, insightful, evocative, and searingly suspenseful novel of past crimes and present evil.

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Publish date: Mar 17, 2009
Added to Scribd: Aug 27, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercialISBN:9780061828799
List Price: $4.99

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04/12/2014

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9780061828799

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balthazar0lawson reviewed this
Rated 3/5
I enjoyed this book and it explains a lot about the relationship between characters that one misses when not reading a series in order of being written. But it's a book that does stand up on it's own two feet without having had to have read any of the others in the series.

This novel is a mix of an old story and a new story, linked across the decades, that come together rather well. Mostly, it's evenly paced but there are times when Alan Banks gets retrospective that slows the story down, just when the pace has picked up some. This sort of thing is fine at the beginning of a story but not in the last 100 pages when we are all waiting for the climax.

Worth reading.
enetikovt reviewed this
Rated 4/5
Good mystery thriller with flahbacks
sunflower6_cris reviewed this
Rated 2/5
I found the book to be slow moving and at times hard to follow. I didn't get caught up in the story until I got to about page 150, I had to continue to read in hopes that the book would eventually become exciting, as exciting as the jacket described it to be. The main thing about this book is that there is three main stories with about 4 to 5 subplots. There was way too much information given about minor characters. However, the main character, Alan Banks, although a bit strange was a very strong character. Eventually you get halfway through the book and the story becomes interesting, but unfortunately, I figured out who the murderer was early on in the story. It seemed as though it was difficult for Peter Robinson to keep the story moving forward. It wasn't the worst book I've read, but it could have been better.
startingover_1 reviewed this
Rated 3/5
Robinson interweaves a contemporary detective investigation with the wartime journals of Gwen Shackleton. Gwen turns out to be the sister-in-law of Gloria Shackleton, whose skeleton is discovered in a dried-out reservoir constructed on the site of a deserted Yorkshire village.Gloria was a land girl whose husband, Matthew, went missing during the war, believed killed in a Japanese POW camp. Fifty years on, Chief Inspector Alan Banks has the unenviable task of trying to solve Gloria's murder. There's a great sense of period in Gwen's journals, and the two time threads work well together. The novel reminded me a lot of the detective fiction of Peter Lovesey, which I like a great deal. Banks is also quite similar to Lovesey's detective, Peter Diamond - they're basically just ordinary, decent chaps - 'bright working class boys' to use Robinson's description of Banks.The answer to Gloria's murder is drawn out gradually and satisfyingly. There are no contrived plot twists or deus ex machina surprises. A very solid detective novel, and the historical fiction element gives it an extra dimension.
romonko reviewed this
Rated 5/5
I agree with a number of people that this is a great series and that this book is where the series steps over to be a serious contender in the great mystery series genre. I have enjoyed the books up to now, but they did not really prepare me for the complexity of this novel. Robinson's Chief Inspector Banks is a wonderful creation. This is a book that blends the past and the present and Robinson does this seamlessly. We flit back and forth from present-day England to England during the Second World War. The book is definitely more than an exciting murder mystery. It is an exploration of human behaviour and it is very provocatively written. Banks is currently suffering a bit both in his career and in his personal life, so when a skeleton is discovered buried under a reservoir that has dried up due to drought, he knows that this case will be one that will reshape his career and hopefully add some meaning to his life as he has been trying to get used to be separated from his wife of 20 years. Even he doesn't anticipate where pursuit of the solution of this case will take him. For anyone who loves to read intelligently written British police procedural mysteries, do not miss Peter Robinson.
charlie68_1 reviewed this
Rated 2/5
At times a very poorly written book, filled with characters that talk in noithing but cliches. The character of Inspector Banks I found extremely disappointing, as colourless as they come. This is my intro to Robinson and this character I hope the other books are better. The plot was intriguing along with the history, but otherwise I wish I could take back the book.
craso_3 reviewed this
Rated 5/5
The small village of Hobb's End in England was turned into a reservoir a few years after World War II. A dry spell has caused the water level to recede and the town has reappeared. When a young boy is playing in the abandoned village, he falls through an out building roof and discovers a woman's skeleton. Chief Inspector Banks is called in by a superior, who has a grudge against him, to investigate the fifty year old crime. With the help of DC Annie Cabot, Banks delves into the past to discover who this woman was and why anyone would want to kill her.I enjoy reading novels that teach me something about the past. This mystery brings back to life the people who lived in a small British village during World War II. There are details about rationing, traveling, blackouts, and the destruction of the blitz. The story switches between the modern day and the 1940's, and does so seamlessly. I was never confused about where I was or when. This is a straightforward procedural mystery with a historical twist. It was a great read.
edgoldberg reviewed this
Rated 4/5
My first Inspector Banks book and I'm a fan. Even though I started in the middle of the series, it didn't matter. Banks is in hot water with his commanding officer, Riddle, so Riddle sends him on a non-sense case. His co-worker on the case is Annie Cabbot, also persona non-grata.It is the mid-90s. Thirteen year old Adam Kelley was playing in the dried up reservoir that was once the town of Hobbs End (it was flooded in the early 1950s to make the reservoir) when he fell off a roof into what was originally an outhouse. His arm sinks in the mud and when he pulls it out, he's holding the skeleton of a human hand. Banks and Cabbot are called to the scene. Robinson alternates between current events (the police procedures to find information about the victim and her associates) and a narrative of the times leading up to the murder, since murder it is.The story has a nice blend of the varying time frames and readers get a great sense of life in rural England during WW II. The current activity is interesting as the police find it difficult to get dated information. They must surmise, guess, etc.In a Dry Season held my interest from the first page and I read it as non-stop as I could in order to find out what happened. I'm not a big British mystery fan, but this may change my mind. It's a great read.
darrol_1 reviewed this
Rated 3/5
Usually I do not like books with retrospective narration paralleling the current plot. But in this case, with the insight into the British home front during World War II, it was interesting.
oregonreader reviewed this
Rated 4/5
This is one of a series of 16 books about Inspector Alan Banks. Set in the English Midlands, each book follows the solving of a crime and also follows the events of his private life. In a Dry Season is the best of the series, taking place when his marriage has ended and he is struggling in his professional life. The mystery involves a murder committed at the end of World War II and it is fascinating the way pieces of the puzzles are slowly fit together. A really first rate mystery writer.

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P. 1
In a Dry Season