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P. 1
24 Declassified: Trinity

24 Declassified: Trinity

Ratings:

4.03

(425)
|Views: 2,277|Likes:
Published by HarperCollins

Operating out of a nearly empty space in Los Angeles, the newly created CTU faces its first major crisis. A large amount of plastique explosive has vanished and could be anywhere—with criminals, crazies, outlaw bikers . . . or in the bloodstained hands of Islamic radicals. As powerful representatives of the world's major religions gather for a conference on faith, peace, and coexistence, agents of the newborn elite counterterrorism unit must chase elusive shadows through the underbelly of L.A. A nightmare of assassination and terror is looming, tied to the darkest secrets of the church—an explosive threat that must be exposed and defused within twenty-four hours, or violent repercussions will be felt around the world.

And only one man possesses the necessary passion, ruthless skill, and willingness to operate outside his jurisdiction and beyond the limits of the law: a dangerous rogue CIA operative . . . named Jack Bauer.

Operating out of a nearly empty space in Los Angeles, the newly created CTU faces its first major crisis. A large amount of plastique explosive has vanished and could be anywhere—with criminals, crazies, outlaw bikers . . . or in the bloodstained hands of Islamic radicals. As powerful representatives of the world's major religions gather for a conference on faith, peace, and coexistence, agents of the newborn elite counterterrorism unit must chase elusive shadows through the underbelly of L.A. A nightmare of assassination and terror is looming, tied to the darkest secrets of the church—an explosive threat that must be exposed and defused within twenty-four hours, or violent repercussions will be felt around the world.

And only one man possesses the necessary passion, ruthless skill, and willingness to operate outside his jurisdiction and beyond the limits of the law: a dangerous rogue CIA operative . . . named Jack Bauer.

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Publish date: Jul 8, 2008
Added to Scribd: Aug 27, 2013
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9780061734113
List Price: $6.99

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04/14/2014

368

9780061734113

$6.99

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hadriantheblind reviewed this
Rated 2/5
Happy Saint Patrick's Day, ladies and gentlemen. As you are aware, anybody with greater than 1/32nd Irish descent in the United States is able to participate in today's festivities, which includes pretty much everybody here. So have at it.

Partly due to the upcoming festivities, and partly because I had a long plane trip, I breezed through this. It makes for a fair airplane read, but not much else. I did enjoy the snippets of historical background and news clippings scattered near the end, but it really isn't too complex. Good versus evil, good gives a hard fight, good still loses, but they still Learn a Lesson. Lots of caricatured personalities and dry writing. But it serves.

Ah well.
janarose1 reviewed this
Rated 5/5
I reluctantly picked this book up after receiving it as a Christmas present. Boy was I wrong about my initial impressions. I devoured the entire book in less than a week. I found the story fascinating. The dichotomy between the haves and have-nots in Ireland and the constant struggle was intriguing. The author created well rounded characters, who seemed to suffer unimaginably. The book read like nonfiction. Overall, highly recommended.
missboyer3 reviewed this
Rated 5/5
A sweeping and powerful epic adventure that captures the "terrible beauty" of Ireland during its long and bloody struggle for freedom. It is the electrifying story of an idealistic young Catholic rebel and the valiant and beautiful Protestant girl who defied her heritage to join his cause. It is a tale of love and danger, of triumph at an unthinkable cost — a magnificent portrait of a people divided by class, faith, and prejudice — an unforgettable saga of the fires that devastated a majestic land . . . and the unquenchable flames that burn in the human heart.
baswood reviewed this
Rated 3/5
An historical novel with fictional characters and events set against the history of Ireland from the1880s to 1914. It is pulp fiction and so the heroes are very heroic and the female lead characters act nobly in all situations., everything is black and white, with very little shades of grey, however the background to the story is well handled. The struggle for existence of the Irish catholic farmers and the industrialisation of Belfast are brought vividly to life. Everything is ratcheted up a notch too high but the underlying problems and issues are laid out in such a way as to stir the emotions. The book is wide ranging touching on: Gaelic family life, factory working conditions, rugby league, Irish unionism, terrorism, religious fervour.and colonialism. Uris manages to keep all these balls in the air and at the same time tell a good yarn if at times it becomes a bit episodic. I sort of enjoyed this novel, but it became a bit of an epic at 750 pages.
judithrs reviewed this
Rated 4/5
Trinity. Leon Uris. 1976. I don’t know how I missed this book since I had read every novel he had written up to this time. I can only think that at the time of its publication I was not interested in Ireland. If you liked Ari Ben Canaan in Exodus and Sean O’Sullivan in Armageddon, you will also like Conor Larkin in Trinity. Uris had a gift for creating romantic, tragic male characters and Conor Larkin fills the bill. Readers follow the horrible history of Ireland from the potato famine in the 1840s to the Easter Uprising in 1916 through the lives of Conor Larkins’ Irish family and the lives of the rich protestant industrialist Frederick Weed and his daughter Caroline. This is a readable historic novel of a terrible time
kraaivrouw reviewed this
Rated 3/5
Let's begin by stipulating that Uris is a pulp fiction writer and should be read and reviewed on those terms. There's absolutely nothing wrong with pulp fiction - it's a great and wonderful genre full of entertainment value. With Uris' books the formula is pretty simple: Our hero is noble, well-read, and self-sacrificing. He's closed himself off, but is waiting for the right woman. The right woman is also noble and self-sacrificing, but strong-willed and beautiful. He sets these folks down in the middle of some big historical conflict and then uses them to give readers a bit of a history lesson. He's typically got a bias, but most history does. These are good solid historical epics.I really like Mila 18, his book about the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. It inspired me to read a lot of actual history of the event including a number of diaries that were recovered from there. Likewise with Trinity, which I read once before, I will most likely go read more Irish history.Trinity is a decent vehicle for imparting quite a bit of history from the Irish perspective. It's a good read for making you think about the impact of imperialism and industrialization. There's an excellent set of chapters on early twentieth century factories and a factory fire that will remind you why unions came about in a really visceral way.This is a dense read, but it's entertaining and interesting in parts and is probably a good gateway to other more substantive reads on the subject matter.
jastbrown reviewed this
Rated 5/5
Excellent book, read a lifetime ago. At the time, I remember thinking that it was the only book to adequately explain 'the trouble' in Ireland and how they came about.
mrslee_1 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
An historical novel, Trinity is about the Irish uprising and battle for independence. The author chose to show the plight of the Irish Catholics through fictional characters and fictionalized actual events. It covers the history of the conflict from about the mid-1800s to just before the Easter Rising, jumping back and forth between Catholic, Protestant and English characters.I appreciated the scope and depth of the information, I really knew very little about this moment in history. The author knows how to build a story and grip your emotions and sympathies for the characters and events, as well as set out clearly the motivations of the parties involved.At the end though, I felt as if I had been emotionally tweaked. I will not believe that every person committed to their faith is an evil, bigoted, hateful human being and that the only compassionate, sensible and decent human beings are the atheists and revolutionaries. Nor can I believe that every English man and woman is a beast who cares nothing for others. That is the impression the book leaves you with. It is not even-handed in any way. I don't like to be tweaked by ministers, politicians or writers, however, I am glad to have read this book, as it did give me insight to the bitterness and sorrows of a part of humanity, and what they did to overcome it. It also made me dig deeper into a part of history I had only glossed over until now.
vhoeschler reviewed this
Rated 5/5
This is one of the better books I've ever read. It is a true Irish saga with all the right ingredients; the poor Catholic family, the wealthy Protestent family, economic progression, societal destruction, love affairs, political uprisings, etc. The book is quite long but the story propels itself with a passion. I love books that I can really "sink my teeth into" and this one fit the bill!
jonwwil reviewed this
Rated 3/5
This was a slow read, which isn't typical for me. It started slow because of the dialect, and because of the task of figuring out how so many characters fit into the story. Mainly, though, it was slow because of the depth of history it covers, a history with which I was largely unfamiliar.The reward of reading this book, though, lies in the history it covers. I knew only vaguely, going in, of the strife between Ireland and England, and this book really explores that conflict and gives a face to it. On that score, it's a pretty staggering work.In terms of the writing, I thought it was a little clumsy. Dreams were used as plot points on a couple of occasions, which strikes me as extremely lazy, and I couldn't quite figure out the purpose of the occasional first-person narrator, especially when, if you can forgive the spoiler, he doesn't even live to tell the tale. In general, I was disappointed in the characters, which were pretty flat and one-dimensional, nothing more than tools for advancing the plot.Still, for all of its flaws, this was a pretty good read, and I'll soon be taking up the sequel, Redemption. I'm given to understand that some of Trinity's loose ends are tied up in that one, and I'm definitely interested to see how that works.

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24 Declassified: Trinity