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Making It Magazine - Issue 8: We can do it! (UNIDO - 2011)

Making It Magazine - Issue 8: We can do it! (UNIDO - 2011)

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Published by HayZara Madagascar
‘Women hold up half the sky’ is a Chinese proverb affirming women’s equal contribution to the human experience but it is an aspirational, rather than a factual, claim. In developed and developing countries alike, gender gaps persist in education, health, work, wages and political participation.

For this issue of Making It, the theme is gender equality and the economic empowerment of women. As Kofi Annan, former UN Secretary-General, pointed out, “There is no tool for development more effective than the empowerment of women”.

Women work two-thirds of the world’s working hours but women earn only 10% of the world’s income, and women own less than 1% of the world’s property. Women lag far behind men in access to land, credit, and decent jobs, even though a growing body of research shows that enhancing women’s economic options boosts national economies. As the current UN Secretary-General, Ban Ki-moon, has said, “When we empower women, we empower communities, nations, and the entire human family.”

The first UN Women annual report, 2010-11, states, “Where women have equal access to economic assets, decent livelihoods and leadership opportunities – the building blocks of economic empowerment – economic well-being increases.”

We are delighted to have a keynote article on the challenge of empowering women by Michelle Bachelet, the Executive Director of UN Women. Making It thanks colleagues at UN Women for their help in putting this issue together.
‘Women hold up half the sky’ is a Chinese proverb affirming women’s equal contribution to the human experience but it is an aspirational, rather than a factual, claim. In developed and developing countries alike, gender gaps persist in education, health, work, wages and political participation.

For this issue of Making It, the theme is gender equality and the economic empowerment of women. As Kofi Annan, former UN Secretary-General, pointed out, “There is no tool for development more effective than the empowerment of women”.

Women work two-thirds of the world’s working hours but women earn only 10% of the world’s income, and women own less than 1% of the world’s property. Women lag far behind men in access to land, credit, and decent jobs, even though a growing body of research shows that enhancing women’s economic options boosts national economies. As the current UN Secretary-General, Ban Ki-moon, has said, “When we empower women, we empower communities, nations, and the entire human family.”

The first UN Women annual report, 2010-11, states, “Where women have equal access to economic assets, decent livelihoods and leadership opportunities – the building blocks of economic empowerment – economic well-being increases.”

We are delighted to have a keynote article on the challenge of empowering women by Michelle Bachelet, the Executive Director of UN Women. Making It thanks colleagues at UN Women for their help in putting this issue together.

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Published by: HayZara Madagascar on Aug 29, 2013
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03/17/2014

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MakingI
IndustryforDevelopment
4th quarter 2011
Wecandoit!
n
The end of growth?
n
UN Women’sMichelle Bachelet
n
South Africa
n
Hydrogen energyto the rescue?
n
Paul Polak
 
A quarterly magazine. Stimulating, criticaland constructive. A forum for discussionand exchange about the intersection of industry and development.
NUMBER 
1
, DECEMBER 
2009
l
We must let nature inspire us –Gunter Pauli presents analternative business model that isenvironmentally friendly andsustainable
l
Hot Topic: Is itpossible to have prosperitywithout growth? Is ‘green growth’really possible?NUMBER 
2
, APRIL
2010
l
The International EnergyAgency’s Nobuo Tanaka looks atenergy transitions for industry
l
Energy for all – Kandeh Yumkella and Leena Srivastavaon what needs to be done toimprove energy accessNUMBER 
3
, JULY
2010
l
China’s stunning economicrise: interview with minister of commerce, Chen Deming
l
Towards a more productivedebate – Ha-Joon Chang calls for an acceptance that industrialpolicy can workNUMBER 
4
, NOVEMBER 
2010
l
Strengthening productivecapacity – Cheick Sidi Diarraargues that the LDCs should –and can – produce more, andbetter quality, goods
l
PatriciaFrancis on climate change andtrade
l
Hot topic: The relevanceof entrepreneurshipNUMBER 
5
, FEBRUARY
2011
l
A window of opportunity for world trade? – Peter Sutherlandassesses the prospects for theconclusion of a multilateral tradeagreement
l
A path to mutualprosperity –Xiao Ye on tradebetween sub-Saharan Africa andChinaNUMBER 
6
, APRIL
2011
l
Feeding a crowded world –IFAD’s Kanayo Nwanze arguesthat smallholder farmers musthave opportunities to beentrepreneurs
l
Nestlé CEOPaul Bulcke on ‘Creating Shared Value’
l
Hot Topic: Does energyefficiency lead to increasedenergy consumption?NUMBER 
7
, JULY
2011
l
The globalization paradox –Dani Rodrik
l
Unfair share –Thomas Pogge on affluentcountries’ responsibility for increasing global poverty
l
Hot topic: Is nuclear power necessary for a carbon-freefuture?
 
MakingIt 
3
‘Women hold up half the sky’ is a Chinese proverb affirming women’sequal contribution to the human experience but it is an aspirational,rather than a factual, claim. In developed and developing countriesalike, gender gaps persist in education, health, work, wages andpolitical participation.For this issue of 
Making It,
the theme is gender equality and theeconomic empowerment of women. As Kofi Annan, former UNSecretary General, pointed out, “There is no tool for development moreeffective than the empowerment of women”.Women work two-thirds of the world’s working hours but womenearn only 10% of the world’s income, and women own less than 1%of the world’s property. Women lag far behind men in accessto land, credit, and decent jobs, even though a growing body of research shows that enhancing womenseconomic options boosts national economies. Asthe current UN Secretary-General, Ban Ki-moon,has said, “When we empower women, weempower communities, nations, and theentire human family.”The first UN Women annual report,2010-11, states, “Where women have equalaccess to economic assets, decent livelihoodsand leadership opportunities – the building blocks of economic empowerment economic well-being increases.”We are delighted to have a keynote articleon the challenge of empowering women byMichelle Bachelet, the Executive Director of UNWomen.
Making It 
thanks colleagues at UN Womenfor their help in putting this issue together.
Editorial

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