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Korotayev A. V. Apologia for "The Sabaean Cultural-Political Area" // Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies 57 (1994): 469-474.

Korotayev A. V. Apologia for "The Sabaean Cultural-Political Area" // Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies 57 (1994): 469-474.

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Published by Korotayev
Saba' (= 'the Sabaeans ') are likely to have been one of the sha`bs, 'communities', on the edge of the Sayhad desert. There is some evidence that very
early, at the beginning of the first millennium B.C., the political leaders ('mlk?) of this tribal community managed to create a huge commonwealth of sha'bs
occupying most of South Arabian territory and took the title mkrb SB', 'mukarrib of the Sabaeans'; at that time this title was quite logical, because these rulers were more important than the ordinary 'kings' ('mlk) of the ordinary autonomous communities, ' tribes' ('s2'b), and the Sabaeans constituted the core of the commonwealth. When it was necessary to mention 'the Sabaean Commonwealth ' as a whole, very reasonable notions were applied - SB' w-gwm, ' the Sabaeans and every (other) community' in the Most Ancient Sub-Period, later SB' w- 's2'bn, "the Sabeans and the communities", and not just SB'; this shows that the Sabaeans (SB') were only one element, though the central one, of the system of the commonwealth. The vast early Sabaean Commonwealth turned out to be a relatively shortlived entity. By the second half of the Ancient Period it had almost disappeared; the area under the direct or indirect control of the Sabaean kings was drastically reduced, and one of the results of this process seems to have been that the Sabaean kings lost the title mukarrib. But what remained from the early Sabaean Commonwealth turned out to be considerably more long-lived and stable than that commonwealth itself. In the area described by Beeston, for several centuries after the end of the early commonwealth of the Sabaean mukarribs, during the second half of the first millennium B.C. and at least till the end of the fourth century A.D., we find a group of sha'bs which not only shared with the Sabaeans the common epigraphic Sabaic language and some common cultural features but also more or less stably and consistently recognized the terrestrial authority of the Miirib kings and the celestial authority of the Sabaean deity Almaqah.
Saba' (= 'the Sabaeans ') are likely to have been one of the sha`bs, 'communities', on the edge of the Sayhad desert. There is some evidence that very
early, at the beginning of the first millennium B.C., the political leaders ('mlk?) of this tribal community managed to create a huge commonwealth of sha'bs
occupying most of South Arabian territory and took the title mkrb SB', 'mukarrib of the Sabaeans'; at that time this title was quite logical, because these rulers were more important than the ordinary 'kings' ('mlk) of the ordinary autonomous communities, ' tribes' ('s2'b), and the Sabaeans constituted the core of the commonwealth. When it was necessary to mention 'the Sabaean Commonwealth ' as a whole, very reasonable notions were applied - SB' w-gwm, ' the Sabaeans and every (other) community' in the Most Ancient Sub-Period, later SB' w- 's2'bn, "the Sabeans and the communities", and not just SB'; this shows that the Sabaeans (SB') were only one element, though the central one, of the system of the commonwealth. The vast early Sabaean Commonwealth turned out to be a relatively shortlived entity. By the second half of the Ancient Period it had almost disappeared; the area under the direct or indirect control of the Sabaean kings was drastically reduced, and one of the results of this process seems to have been that the Sabaean kings lost the title mukarrib. But what remained from the early Sabaean Commonwealth turned out to be considerably more long-lived and stable than that commonwealth itself. In the area described by Beeston, for several centuries after the end of the early commonwealth of the Sabaean mukarribs, during the second half of the first millennium B.C. and at least till the end of the fourth century A.D., we find a group of sha'bs which not only shared with the Sabaeans the common epigraphic Sabaic language and some common cultural features but also more or less stably and consistently recognized the terrestrial authority of the Miirib kings and the celestial authority of the Sabaean deity Almaqah.

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Categories:Types, Research, History
Published by: Korotayev on Jun 14, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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05/11/2014

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