Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Excavation of a settlement and souterrain at Newmill, near Bankfoot, Perthshire. Trevor Watkins, Proc Soc Antiqs Scot 1978-80,165-208.

Excavation of a settlement and souterrain at Newmill, near Bankfoot, Perthshire. Trevor Watkins, Proc Soc Antiqs Scot 1978-80,165-208.

Ratings: (0)|Views: 161|Likes:
Published by Trevor Watkins
The accidental discovery of a souterrain beside the A9 road 14 km (8-7 miles) N of Perth led to its complete excavation investigation severalhundred squaremetres settlement with which
it was associated. A single grave of the Beaker period was also discovered during excavation and is reported elsewhere in this volume. The souterrain was a massive example of the 'southern Pictland' group, and the settlement consisted of timber-framed circular houses of the familiar British Iron Age tradition. Little material cultural remains were recovered, series radiocarbon dates places
souterrain's construction in the last century or so be, its use contemporary with the timber houses alongside, its destruction around 200 ad, and the continued use of the site into the 9th century at least.
The accidental discovery of a souterrain beside the A9 road 14 km (8-7 miles) N of Perth led to its complete excavation investigation severalhundred squaremetres settlement with which
it was associated. A single grave of the Beaker period was also discovered during excavation and is reported elsewhere in this volume. The souterrain was a massive example of the 'southern Pictland' group, and the settlement consisted of timber-framed circular houses of the familiar British Iron Age tradition. Little material cultural remains were recovered, series radiocarbon dates places
souterrain's construction in the last century or so be, its use contemporary with the timber houses alongside, its destruction around 200 ad, and the continued use of the site into the 9th century at least.

More info:

Published by: Trevor Watkins on Aug 30, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

01/04/2014

pdf

text

original

 
Proc
 S
Antig
Scot,
110,
1978-80,165-208
Excavation
of a
settlement
and
souterrain
at
Newmill,
near
Bankfoot,
Perthshire
TrevorWatkins*
with
 a
contribution
 bG
Barclayf
SUMMARY
The
accidental
discovery of a
souterrain
beside the A9
road
14 km
(8-7
miles) N of
Perth
led to its
complete
excavation
 ah
investigation
 o
several
hundred
square
metres
 oh
settlement
with
which
it
was
associated.
A
single
grave
of the
Beaker
period
was
also
discovered
duringexcavation and is
reported
elsewhere
in
this
volume.
The
souterrain
was a
massive example
of the 'southern
Pictland'
group,
and the settlement consisted of
timber-framed
circular
houses
of the
familiar
British
Iron
Age
tradition.
Little material cultural remains
were
recovered,
 ba
series
 o
radiocarbon
dates places
 h
souterrain's
construction in the
last
century or so
be,
its use
contemporary
with
the
timber
houses
alongside,
its destruction
around
200 ad, and the
continued
use of the siteintothe 9thcenturyat
least.
INTRODUCTION
T
site, which
 snw
totally destroyed,
 aaNN
084324, enclosed between
 a
bend in the old A9 to the E and the line of the re-aligned A9 to the W (see fig 1). It lay in a
field
belonging to the farm of Newmill in the parish of Auchtergaven,
Perth
and Kinross District,Tayside Region.
 TodAh
taken
 a
line around
 h
foot
 oa
inconspicuous, low, ovalhill of
fluvio-glacial
outwash sand and gravel, on which the previously unrecorded site wasfound in connection with the work of re-aligning the road through a cutting in the hill to eliminate
th
dangerous bends.
 Tooh
hill
 w
about
 4
m
above
 O
Because
 oh
changes
 n
topography causedby the new
road
andassociated gravel-extractionthesiteisshown bothinrelation to the contours of the hill as they existed immediately before work began and in relationto the present layout of roads (fig 1).
Originally
 w
intended
 o
carry
 h
road
through
 h
hill
 na
cutting,
 b
subsequentlyit was decided to use the eastern half of the hill as a source of material for sub-base for road-building. During exploratory trenching with
 h
back-actor
 oaJC
IIIC
tractor shovel
 h
souterrain
 wc
through.
 Ba
remarkable chain
 o
accidents
 h
unrecognised phenomenon
was
seen and
identified
by Dr M E C Stewart and Mrs D Lye of Perth, who advised the localplanning authority
 ah
Inspectorate
 o
Ancient Monuments
 oh
matter. Planning
per-
mission
was given so as to allow time for excavation, and the present writer was asked to undertakethe investigation of the site prior to destruction. At very short notice an excavation was planned
and
mounted,
funded
by the
Department
of the
Environment,
and
carried
out
between
10
August
a1
September 1977.
 T
number
 o
people working
 oh
site varied
from
three
 ah
*
Department
of
Archaeology, University
of
Edinburgh
t
Central Excavation Unit,
SDD
(Ancient Monuments),
26 E
Bridge Street, Falkirk
 
166
|
PROCEEDINGS
OF
THE
SOCIETY,
1978-80
/
AREA
 O
EXCAVATION
NEWMILL SOUTERRAIN
SITE
LOCATION
 a
CONTOUR
PLAN
d-'
NEWLY
CONSTRUCTED
ROAD
2~
 O
ROAD
 N
CONTINUED
 U
DISUSED
ROAD
Fio
1
Location
of excavation
area
in relation to present and
former
roads,
and
contours
as
before 1977
roadworks
 
WATKINS:
EXCAVATION
OF
SETTLEMENT
AND
SOUTERRAIN
AT
NEWMILL
| 167
beginning
 aeoh
operation
 oa
regular
team
 o
eight
 o
ten,
 a
force
which might
 b
doubled
 b
volunteers
 a
weekends.
Isa
pleasure
 o
acknowledge
 h
financial
 a
personal
support
 oh
Inspectorate
 o
Ancient Monuments at all stages of the work. I am happy also to
acknowledge
the co-operationand help
 oh
contractors
 n
charge
 oh
road-works
 a
gravel-extraction,
 RJ
McLeod
 &
Co and their
subcontractors.
I am particularly
grateful
to the
project manager
for the contractorsand the
subcontractor
responsible for
digging
the
gravel
foragreeingtoextendthetime allowed
for
archaeological excavation
beyond
 h
time
limit
 n
their
planningpermission
when
 w
impossible
to
arrange
thecommencementof the excavation
earlier than
two
weeks
before
the
deadline.
 T
highest accolade
should
 b
given, however,
 oh
small team
 o
volunteers
 w
undertook
 a
completed
 a
excavation
 ooa
proportion
 o
their numbers
 ah
time
available.
Essential
recruiting agents
 a
well
 a
part-time
participants
were
 DMEC
Stewart
and Mrs D Lye. It is no
exaggeration
to say
that
the
work
could not have
been
finished
without
th
help
 o
those
people
 w
came
from
 a
points
 oh
compass
 o
offer
theirhelp
 a
weekends
ooo
days
 a
they
could manage.
 
should also
thank
 h
Secretary
 oh
Royal
Commissionon
 h
Ancient
 a
Historical Monuments
 o
Scotland
 o
sending excellent
photographers
 a
the
Commission'sHi-Spy
camera to
take
the high-level
photographs
from
which
Plate
10 was
made up. And I am
equally
happyto have the opportunity of thanking Mr Tom
Berthon
of
Perth
for his contribution in photographing the site
both
from
the air
(under
mostinappropriate
weather
conditions) and on the ground.
The
objectives
of the
investigation were
to excavate the souterrain
completely
in order to
learn
about
 s
destruction
 o
decay,
 s
structural
history
 a
function,
 as
chronology
 b
means
 o
radiocarbon dating.
 T
possibility
that
 a
settlement
existed
 o
which
extensive
traces
might
 b
recovered
 wnh
forefront
 oh
writer's mind because
 oh
experience
 oh
excavations
 a
Dalladies Site
 2
Kincardineshire
(see
 p
122-64).
Thus
 a
second
 so
objectives
was
tosearchfor and
investigate
traces
of occupation and
activitybeside
the
souterrain
and to
try
torelatethe
souterrain
to the settlement. In the
event
it was
found
that
the souterrain was
scarcely
contained
within the
area
which
had
been agreed
with the
contractor
wouldbe
available
for
excavation,
and the
portion
of the
settlement which
was investigated was tantalisingly
insufficient.
On theother
handthere
were
constraints
within
which
we
wereforced
or
chose
to
work.
In the
first
place
the cutting in which the
road
was
originally planned
to run wasalready
cut
before
the
writer
was
involved,
so
that
the
area
of the crown of the
hill
to the W of the
excavation
area
was alreadylost.The
areas
to the N and S of the
excavation
area
were
conceded
to the
contractor
without
investigation
 aa
quid
 poq
oa
extension
 oh
time-limit
 oh
excavation.
 Oh
other
hand
 wa
calculated
risk
taken
 nh
knowledge
 oh
likely
sizeof
 h
excavation
team
 ah
very
limitedtime available.
 Tk
area,
 ohWoh
exca-vation
area,
 w
lost
before
 h
excavation
 w
planned.
The excavation area was stripped by a Liebherr 911
tracked back-actor
fitted
with
a
broad
toothless
blade.
 T
machine
 a
operator
were
loaned
 bh
contractor
free
 o
charge,
 a
were
brought
a
long distance
for the purpose, for
which
I was
very grateful.
The area was
then
roughly
cleaned
by
hand
before
being
carefully
cleaned
twice
by
trowel
and
brush. Thus
the
souterrain,
 h
contractor's
machine-dugsoundings
 aa
number
 o
soil-
 o
soil-and-stone-filled
features
 c
into
 h
gravel subsoil
were
located.
 T
rest
 oh
excavation
fell
technically into
two
parts.
 T
souterrain
 w
investigated
 soao
yield
 a
reasonable
number
 o
sections through
th
fill
 nsoaa
that
 w
consonant
with
 h
need
 o
haste.
Except
 ah
foot
 o
sections
th
lowest
portion
 oh
fill
 oh
souterrain
 w
left
 ob
excavated
carefully,
separately
from
the
rest
and as one
entity representing(perhaps)
the use of the
structure
as
opposed
to its
fill.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->