Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Sermon on Psalm Eighteen

Sermon on Psalm Eighteen

Ratings: (0)|Views: 2 |Likes:
Published by glennpease



SERMON ON PSALM EIGHTEEN

BY W. J. STRACEY

" The Lord my God shall make my darkness to be light*'

Psalm xviii. 28.



SERMON ON PSALM EIGHTEEN

BY W. J. STRACEY

" The Lord my God shall make my darkness to be light*'

Psalm xviii. 28.

More info:

Published by: glennpease on Aug 30, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

08/30/2013

pdf

text

original

 
SERMO O PSALM EIGHTEEBY W. J. STRACEY" The Lord my God shall make my darkness to be light*'Psalm xviii. 28.WE have no less than three versions of the wholeof this 18th psalm. There is the one in theusual place in our Bible ; the one in our Prayer-book ;and besides this, 2 Samuel xxii. is this psalm. Weare told it was composed by David after God haddelivered him out of the hand of Saul ; but there aremany passages in it which we cannot anyhow apply tothe history of David. There seems to be a referencein this, as in so many other psalms, to the earlierhistory of God's deliverance of Israel, and their miracu-lous sojourn in the barren wilderness ; and clearly alsoit looks forward to the triumph of Christ, and the glorywhich should be revealed in and through Him. Oneverse in particular is quoted by S. Paul in Bomans xv. inproof of God's design to call us Gentiles into covenantwith him. It is here written, " For this cause I willgive thanks unto thee, Lord, among the Gentiles,and sing praises unto thy name." And this can in noIDICATIOS OF CHRIST. 145way be interpreted as belonging to David, but only toChrist, in whom we have obtained salvation, as S. Pauldeclares to the Athenians — " The times of this ignoranceGod winked at ; but now commandeth all men every-where to repent : because He hath appointed a day, inthe which He will judge the world in righteousness bythat man whom He hath ordained; whereof He hathgiven assurance unto all men, in that He hath raisedHim from the dead." If we look attentively through
 
this psalm we shall find many very striking passagesin it — passages which, though the idea of some mayhave been taken from the events in the wilderness,such as the giving of the law from mount Sinai amidthe fire, and lightning, and thunder, which awed theIsraelites, or the smiting of the rock which gushed outwith water, yet are clearly applicable to the personalhistory of our Lord Jesus Christ and His future comingin glory to judge the world. Bishop Home says in hiscommentary on this psalm, " An application is made of the whole psalm to the sufferings, resurrection, right-eousness, and conquests of Christ, to the destruction of the Jews, and the conversion of the Gtentiles. In aword, the psalm, it is apprehended, should now be con-sidered as a glorious triumphal hynm to be sung bythe Church risen and victorious in Christ her Head.*'And in this way it is that so much of it may be foundto apply to ourselves, and what part more so than thefew words I have chosen for my text — " The Lord myL146 PSALM XVIII.God shall make my darkness to be light"? If we applythese words to Christ our Lord, we see that they werefulfilled, and are still more to be fulfilled. He who wasbom in the darkness of Christmas night, in the stableof Bethlehem, came to be " the light of the worid"— "the light which lighteneth every man which comethinto the worid." He was the Sun of righteousnessrising upon the darkness which had shrouded the wholeearth for so long, and " brought life and immortality tolight through the gospel." His own dark life, passedin poverty and obscurity, was terminated by that seizureby night in the garden of Gethsemane, and that trialbefore it was yet day, and when at noontide for three
 
hours the sun hid His face, and "there was darknessover all the land from the sixth to the ninth hour."Then this was followed by the darkness of the grave,in that new tomb hewn out of the rock. But "theLord my God shall make my darkness to be light"Easter morn, at its first streak of light, saw death van-quished, and the Son of God risen from the dead, neveragain to return to corruption, but to reign for ever andever in glory — " in the light which no man can approachunto," " whom no man hath seen, nor can see, to whombe glory for ever and ever. Amen." Thus it was ful-filled in Him our Head — " The Lord my God shall makemy darkness to be light."And no less true, my brethren, is. it fulfilled invarious ways in each of us who are truly God*s people.GOD WORKS LITTLE BY LITTLE, 147God seldom works His works rapidly and suddenly. Theusual order of His doings in providence and nature, aswell as in grace, is to work silently, surely, and almostimperceptibly: "First the blade, then the ear, after-wards the full com in the ear."How very gradual, and how very slow, has been theprogress of the gospel as a whole in the earth. Thereis still the old promise of the prophet sounding in ourears, that "the earth shall be full of the tnowledgeof the Lord, as the waters cover the sea ;" yet in thisnineteenth century in which we live, since the re-demption of man, how few are Christians in numbercompared to the heathen ! How small a portion of theworld has the true light of Christ's gospel and Christ'sgrace shining upon it ! Yet " the Lord my God shallmake my darkness to be light." Yes, we may live andwork in hope of this. Let us do (mr part, brethren, ourbest, for Christ in the world. His truth will prevail in

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->