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Stukenberg v. Perry - Order to Certify Class

Stukenberg v. Perry - Order to Certify Class

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Published by FindLaw
A Texas federal judge ordered that a class of abused foster children could proceed in a suit against the state of Texas.

The class had been previously de-certified by the Fifth Circuit following the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in a 2011 Walmart class action case.
A Texas federal judge ordered that a class of abused foster children could proceed in a suit against the state of Texas.

The class had been previously de-certified by the Fifth Circuit following the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in a 2011 Walmart class action case.

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Categories:Business/Law
Published by: FindLaw on Aug 30, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURTSOUTHERN DISTRICT OF TEXASCORPUS CHRISTI DIVISION
M.D.; bnf STUKENBERG,
et al
,Plaintiffs,VS. CIVIL ACTION NO. 2:11-CV-84RICK PERRY,
et al
,Defendants.§§§§§§§§
ORDER
Before the Court is Plaintiffs’ Motion for Class Certification and Appointment of ClassCouncil. (D.E. 160). Plaintiffs have asked the Court to certify one General Class and foursubclasses. Also currently before the Court is Defendants’ Motion for Partial SummaryJudgment on the claims of named plaintiffs D.I., S.R.,
1
M.R., and J.R., Plaintiffs’ Motion forLeave to File a Fourth Amended Complaint, and Plaintiffs’ Motion for Leave to File Reply inSupport of that motion. (D.E. 199; 205; 212). For the reasons stated below, Plaintiffs’ Motionfor Class Certification is GRANTED in part and DENIED in part. Defendants’ Motion forPartial Summary Judgment is DENIED as moot. Plaintiffs’ Motion for Leave to File Reply inSupport of Motion for Leave to File a Fourth Amended Complaint and Motion for Leave to Filea Fourth Amended Complaint are GRANTED.
I.
 
Jurisdiction
Plaintiffs bring their claims under 42 U.S.C. § 1983. (D.E. 179 at 7). This Court hencehas subject matter jurisdiction over this case per 28 U.S.C. § 1331.
 
1
S.R. is listed as S.T. in the Third Amended Complaint (D.E. 179) and Plaintiffs’ Brief in Support of Motion forClass Certification (D.E. 160). The initials are corrected in Plaintiffs’ Post-Hearing Brief (D.E. 195). Class Cert.Hr’g 1/23/13(Young) at 207-10.
Case 2:11-cv-00084 Document 213 Filed in TXSD on 08/27/13 Page 1 of 107
 
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II.
 
BackgroundA.
 
Procedural History
Plaintiffs are minor children in the custody of the Texas Department of Family andProtective Services (“DFPS”). They are all in DFPS’s Permanent Managing Conservatorship(“PMC”). On March 29, 2011 Plaintiffs filed suit through their next friends against Rick Perry,Governor of Texas, Thomas Suehs, Executive Commissioner of the Health and Human ServicesCommission of the State of Texas, and Anne Heiligenstein, Commissioner of the Department of Family and Protective Services of the State of Texas (collectively, “Defendants”), in theirofficial capacities.
2
(D.E. 1). On April 5, 2011 Plaintiffs filed a Motion for Class Certification.The Court granted their motion on June 2, 2011, holding that the requirements of Federal Rulesof Civil Procedure Rule 23 had been met. (D.E. 49). Defendants appealed to the Fifth CircuitCourt of Appeals pursuant to Rule 23(f). (D.E. 63). On March 23, 2012 the Fifth Circuitvacated the class certification order and remanded the case to this Court for proceedings in lightof the intervening Supreme Court ruling in
Wal-Mart v. Dukes,
131 S. Ct. 2541 (2011).
 M.D. exrel. Stuckenberg v. Perry
, 675 F.3d 832 (5
th
Cir. 2012) (“
 MD
”). Plaintiffs filed a second motionto certify the class on October 5, 2012. (D.E. 160).
B.
 
Factual Background
When the Child Protective Services (“CPS”) division of DFPS determines a child hasbeen maltreated or is at risk and should not remain in her home it removes the child and petitionsa court for Temporary Managing Conservatorship (“TMC”) over the child. If TMC is granted,
2
Kyle Janek has since replaced Suehs as Executive Commissioner of the Health and Human Services Commissionand John J. Specia, Jr. has replaced Heiligenstein as Commissioner of DFPS. Plaintiffs’ pleadings have beenamended to reflect these changes. (D.E. 179).
Case 2:11-cv-00084 Document 213 Filed in TXSD on 08/27/13 Page 2 of 107
 
3 / 107DFPS takes custody of the child and attempts to achieve reunification or, if this is not possible,place the child with a new, permanent family. TMC lasts one year unless a court orders that it beextended another six months. If at the termination of TMC the child has not been reunified orplaced in a new family the child is transferred to the PMC. The child remains in the State’s PMCuntil he or she is adopted, custody is otherwise transferred, or they age out of the system. (D.E.179 at 1-2). There are roughly 12,000 children in the PMC at a given time. (D.E. 195 at 18).Children in the PMC are placed in a variety of different settings. Many of theseplacements are managed by private child placing agencies (“CPAs”) that contract with the State.DFPS also directly places some children in homes and residential facilities. In both cases theResidential Child Care Licensing (“RCCL”) division of DFPS has the ultimate responsibility forinspections and investigations of placements, as well as licensing and monitoring CPAs. Fosterfamily homes are traditional foster homes and contain fewer than 7 children. They are verifiedand the caregivers receive training and financial support. The verification process involvesscreening the home and conducting a variety of inspections to ensure the placement meets therequirements related to the type of care it will provide. (PX 50 at 204). Foster group homescontain 7 to 12 children but are otherwise almost identical to foster family homes. (PX 390 at 2).They are regulated, receive financial support, but are not required to have nighttime awakesupervision. (PX 50). Facilities that contain 13 or more children are termed General ResidentialOperations (“GROs”). They are licensed by the RCCL, subject to extensive regulations, andreceive financial support. (PX 49). Presently, GROs have capacities ranging from 13 to 437residents. (PX 302). Residential Treatment Centers (“RTCs”) are a type of GRO that providespecialized treatment. (PX 390 at 2).
Case 2:11-cv-00084 Document 213 Filed in TXSD on 08/27/13 Page 3 of 107

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