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Multilingual Glossary

Multilingual Glossary

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Published by Mark A. Foster
This glossary contains words from Arabic, Sanskrit, Pali, Persian, Urdu, Turkish, and other languages. The primary focus is upon my own work on the Baháʾí Faith. This work is dedicated to my late parents (Corinne and Harold Foster), my late spiritual mother (Elizabeth Thomas), and my guardian angel, Ḥaḍrat Sulṭān Bāhū. The inspiration for the glossary is the medieval Indian Bhakṭī-Ṣūfī movement.
This glossary contains words from Arabic, Sanskrit, Pali, Persian, Urdu, Turkish, and other languages. The primary focus is upon my own work on the Baháʾí Faith. This work is dedicated to my late parents (Corinne and Harold Foster), my late spiritual mother (Elizabeth Thomas), and my guardian angel, Ḥaḍrat Sulṭān Bāhū. The inspiration for the glossary is the medieval Indian Bhakṭī-Ṣūfī movement.

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Published by: Mark A. Foster on Aug 31, 2013
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12/29/2014

 
 
O Glory of the All-Glorious! This extensive multilingual glossary is a
personal project 
. I develop 
 ™ 
 (an eclectic version of  critical realism) and apply it, through 
 ™ 
, to sociology, including religious studies, along with many other subject areas. My selection criteria combine 
 ™ 
 with simple personal interest. If one or more of the original languages are not displaying properly, you do not have the relevant
 
Unicode fonts installed on your computer. You can, as an alternative, download a reasonably current PDFed version of the
copyrighted 
 book for your
personal 
 use. However, it is
not 
 for further distribution or for reposting.
Arabic (ʾal
-
ʿArabiyyaẗ), t
he default language for any non-English words defined in this text, is
transliterated according to my own syste
. Pāḷi, a
language which is now only studied by buddhologists, other scholars, and Buddhist scholar-practitioners, is
conventionally transcribed with the Dēvanāgarī Sanskrit (Saṃskṛtam) script. Modern Hindī, Angikā, Nepālī, and, sometimes, Marāṭhī, Koṃkaṇī, and Kashmiri (Kaśura) are also written in Dēvanāgarī. Sanskrit, Pāḷi, Hindī, Angikā, Nepālī, Marāṭhī, Koṃkaṇī, and Kashmiri are Romanized using the
International Alphabet of Sanskrit Transliteration (IAST). Please also note that the glossary is an
ongoing project 
. It is primarily intended for
browsing 
. Any errors in scholarship are entirely my own, including with translations, transliterations, and Romanizations (rough transliterations). I am only fluent in English, but through hard study, and with the help of my personal library and online sources, I hav
e been relearning Hebrew and working my way
 
through the other languages, especially Arabic. Needless to say, praises go to God alone (ʾal-ḥamdu ̹llāh). For me, focusing on translation,
transliteration, and Romanization has been a way to draw close, in my heart, to the individuals and ideas being discussed. Perhaps your own experiences have been similar. Learning any language comes through love.
1.
 
Aamadu Bamba Mbàkke (Wolof language), 1853
 – 
1927, of Senegal (French, le Sénégal, or Wolof language, Senegaal) inspired the
development of ʾal
-
Ṭarīqaẗ ʾal
-
Murīdiyaẗ (see glossary entry). His Arabic name was ꞌAḥmad ʾibn Muḥammad ʾibn Ḥabīb ʾAllāh (
 
ّ
 
ْِ
 
أ
 

 
ْِ
), the highly praised one, son of
Muḥammad, son of the Friend (or the Beloved) of God. He was also known by the title, H ̱ādim ʾal
-
Rasūl (
ا
 
مِد
), servant of the Messenger
(Muḥammad). See also the glossary entry, ʾal
-
Rasūl.
 2.
 
ʾal
-
ꞌAb (
بَا
) or ʾal
-
ʾÂb (
بْا
) is the Father
(Baháʼuʼlláh). ʾal
-
ʾÂbāˁ (
ءَا
) is the plural form
(collectively, “fathers” or “parents”). ʾal
-
ꞌAbawāni (
 
ِناََا
), the dual form, is the parents.
ꞌAbawānī (
ِاََ
), the possessive or an
appurtenance of ꞌabawān (
ناأ
), is my parents.
ꞌAbū (
ُا
) is a combining or constructing form