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Netting

Netting

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Published by maddogandnoriko
Netting
Netting

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Published by: maddogandnoriko on Sep 02, 2013
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09/02/2013

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©
1996, Gerald L. Findley
99
NETTING:
The making of netting is an ancient craft. Manyprehistoric cultures used netting for a verity of uses,storage bags, fencing, hammock, just to name someand of course the obvious use as a fish net. Nomatter what the netting was used for, the knittingof the mesh was done by tying a series of loops insome type of twine.In one method, the basic knot used was thesheet bend. To form and tie the loops a knittingshuttle and a spacer (gauge) were used.
|-------------|----|----------|2 1/2"1/4" 11/2"
|----|3/4"
cross sectionsMake the knitting shuttle from a 1/4 inch * 1inch * 12 inch piece of smooth grained hard wood.Carve and sand the shuttle to the shape shown inthe diagram. Leave the shuttle unfinished; varnishor paint has a tendency to become sticky.
Knitting Gauge:
Make the knitting gauge from a 1/4 inch * 1 1/ 4 inch * 12 inch piece of smooth grained hardwood. Carve and sand the gauge to the shape shownin the diagram. Leave the gauge unfinished; var-nish or paint has a tendency to become sticky.|--------------------12 inches------------------|
                                                                                                                                                                                  1                                                                                                                                                                                   1                                                                                                                                                                                  /                                                                                                                                                                                     4                                                                                                                                                                                   "
cross sections
 |         ------------ |         
Filling The Knitting Shuttle:
STEP 1:
Fill the shuttle with twine.Start by tying a single hitcharound the tongue of the shuttleand then pass the twine throughthe notch.
STEP 2:
Turn the shuttle over,loop the twine around thetongue and then through thenotch.
NETTING TOOLS:
The size of the shuttle and gauge that is neededwill depend on the project that you are workingon. The size of the shuttle and gauge given in thefollowing directions is a convenient size for manyprojects and is also a good size to use for practic-ing the craft of netting. Shuttles and gauges of dif-ferent sizes can be made by changing the size of the materials used.
Knitting Shuttle:
 
100
©
1996, Gerald L. Findley
STEP 3:
Continue turning the shuttle from sideand looping the twine around the tongue untilthe shuttle is filled.
[NOTE]
To prevent synthetic twine from fraying,use a candle flame to cut and fuse the ends.
[WARNING]
Using a butane cigarette lighter tocut or fuse synthetic rope or twine may causethe lighter to over heat and explode.
DIAMOND MESH NETTING:
Diamond mesh netting is the easiest of the twoforms of mesh to make. Square mesh netting willbe dealt with latter.
Casting On:
To start diamond mesh netting thefirst row of mesh loops is cast on to a loop of some kind. The kind of loop used depends onthe project; a ring, grommet, frame or loop of twine may be used. The following directionsare for casting on to a ring but the same stepsmay be used for any starting loop.
STEP 1:
Tie theend of thetwine to thering with aclove hitchstopped withtwo half hitches.
STEP 2:
Place the twine behind the gauge thenbring the twine in front of the gauge and to theright.
[NOTE]:
The dot-ted circles ineach of the dia-grams is used toshow the posi-tion of thethumb and fin-ger of the lefthand.
STEP 3:
Reeve the twine through the ring fromthe front to the back so that an overhand loopis formed.
STEP 5:
Lay the twine across the ring from leftto right.pull
STEP 4:
Pull the twine to the left to tighten thetwine around the ring and the gauge.
 
©
1996, Gerald L. Findley
101
STEP 6:
Reeve the twine through the ring fromthe back to the front.
STEP 7:
Place the twine behind the gauge; thenpull the twine downward to tighten the twinearound the ring. This forms a lark’s head knotaround the ring.
STEP 8:
Repeat steps 2 through 7 for each addi-tional loop required for the project.Netting is made by knitting roes of mesh usinga shuttle and a gauge. The gauge is used to deter-mine the size of the mesh, and the shuttle is usedto hold the twine and form and tie the mesh loops.The basic knot used in netting is the sheet bend.The following diagrams illustrate the tying of thesheet bend as it is used for knitting a net.
KNITTING A ROW OF MESH:
STEP 1:
Bring the twine down and up the back of the gauge. Then pick up the next loop bypassing the shuttle through the loop from frontto back.
STEP 2:
Pull the twine to the left to tighten thetwine around the gauge. Use the thumb andfinger of the left hand to hold the twine in place.
STEP 3:
Lay a loop of twine over the loop justpicked up.

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