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09-03-13

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Sila’s avorite memory o herhome in Syria is sneaking out o her bedroom to play ball with herbrother, Sami, when their par-ents thought they were studying.Sami and Sila Shalhoub ond-ly remember playing sports to-gether and going to churchcamp with their riends in Syria.“I loved growing up there, Imean, I wouldn’t trade it or any-thing,” Sami said. “It’s a really cool environment to live in be-cause everybody will protect you.”Sami and Sila also rememberthe bomb that exploded just twoblocks rom their home in the na-tion’s capital city o Damascus.Te siblings were home visit-ing their amily or Christmas in2011. Sila was staying at a riend’shouse and remembers waking upon Christmas Eve to the sound o the explosion. Sami had drivendown the road where the explosionoccurred just two hours earlier.At rst, Sami thoughtit was a thunderstorm.“I opened up the blinds and itwas clear,” Sami said. “We heardanother explosion and then,you can see it rom my win-dow: there was a lot o smoke.”Sami remembers check-ing Facebook or inormationabout what was happening.“I don’t remember any newsprogram,” Sami said. He couldsee the violence rom his house.
EMIGRATING 
Sami came to the United Statesin 2005, at the age o 17, to study biomedical engineering at Loui-siana ech University. In 2009, hemoved to Lawrence or graduateschool. Sila came directly to theUniversity rom Syria to study Pharmacy in 2009, and the siblingshave shared an apartment since.“Especially since I came to acountry that I didn’t know any-thing about and I could bare-ly speak the language, it’s pretty hard,” Sila said. “So, I’d rather al-ways have my brother with me.”Sami and Sila rst heard o the violence in Syria in March 2011,when they were at a Kansas bas-ketball game in ulsa, Okla.“I didn’t believe it,” Sami said.“I mean I still kind o don’t.When I lived in Syria or 17years, it was always like the sa-est place in the Middle East.”In June 2012, while Sami and hissister were both studying at the Uni- versity, their parents decided it wastoo dangerous to stay in Damascus.Tey moved to the United States orsix months, then spent six monthsin Lebanon. Tey return to Damas-cus as oen as possible to makesure their house is OK, Sami said.Sami and Sila have several rela-tives who haveed to Jordan,Lebanon andother countriesin the PersianGul to escapethe violence.Sami said it’sdicult orpeople to leavetheir homes inSyria, especial-ly people like his grandmother.“Older people just wantto be in their house, whatthey’re used to,” Sami said.
WHAT’S HAPPENING 
Since March 2011, civil war be-tween the government o Presi-dent Bashar al-Assad and rebelorces that want him out o powerhas enguled Syria. Once-peace-ul protests or democracy andgreater reedom turned violentas government security shot atprotesters in Daraa, a city about70 miles south o Damascus.Beore the attacks, Sami said,the streets o Damascus weresae even at three or our in themorning. But now, his riendswho still live in or around Damas-cus go home when the sun sets.“Te shootings start around thattime,” Sami said.Sami under-stands how sig-nicant that vi-olence can be;a loose canonkilled a couple o his riends whenit ell on their car.Te Syriangovernment hasocially denieduse o chemical weapons, but in- vestigations are still underway.Sami does not care whichside used the weapons.“It doesn’t matter who did it,still innocent people are dy-ing and that’s the bigger parto the problem,” Sami said.Beore the violence, it took about 15 minutes or Sila to trav-el rom her best riend’s house toher grandmother’s home. Whenshe visited Damascus one monthago, the government had addedthree checkpoints to the route,making her “quick trip” nearly 45minutes. Although she can heargunshots through her windowsat night, Sila still describes goinghome as “the best eeling ever.”“Whatever happens to me,at least I’m home. At leastI’m in my country,” Sila said.
MISUNDERSTOOD 
“Te ght is really not what isshowed in the media,” Sami said. “oget what is actually happening, youhave to look at more than just theheadlines o just big newspapers.”Sila agrees that the media canbe misleading. All o her inor-mation comes rom riends, am-ily and her personal experience.She can recall several times whena news broadcast reported gun-shots or a bomb explosion in theexact part o the city where one o her riends lives. When she calledthat riend to make sure every-thing was OK, her riend wouldtell her nothing had happened.Many Syrians still support As-sad’s regime, Sami and Sila said,and there wouldn’t be a war i everyone were against him. Teregime loves its people and didmuch to improve Syria, Sila said.Sami said he wants the violenceto stop, but does not think it willend with a government step-down.“I eel like it’s not a ght aboutone person or one religion,”Sami said. “It’s a ght or power.”It isn’t easy or Sami and Sila totalk about the violence in Syria.Tey want people to know the sae,beautiul Syria they grew up in.“I just eel like this is not whatSyria is about,” Sami said. “It’smore than that, it’s really one o thenicest places in the whole world.”
— Edited by Tara Bryant 
All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2013 The University Daily Kansan
CLASSIFIEDS 2BCROSSWORD 5ACRYPTOQUIPS 5AOPINION 4ASPORTS 1BSUDOKU 5A
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ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this photo taken on Aug. 24, a Syrian army soldier walks on a street in the Jobar neighborhood of Damascus, Syria.
UDK
the student voice since 1904
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
 Volume 126 Issue 6
kansan.com
Tuesday, September 3, 2013
BEYOND THE HEADLINE
Sami and Sali used to feel safe in Syria. Now, they can hear the civil war from their window.
JENNIFER SALVA
 jsalva@kansan.com 
“When I lived in Syria for17 years, it was alwayslike the safest place in theMiddle East.”
SAMI SHALHOUBgraduate student
Te start o ootball season is astapproaching, which means that anumber o traditions are set to becelebrated by students. ailgatingactivities around town will kick of as alumni come into town only tond that there is nowhere to park.In an efort to alleviate this yearly headache, the City o Lawrencewill ofer a shuttle bus service toall seven home ootball gamesthis season or a paltry ee o $1. Students and alumni will beable to park downtown, partakein the local restaurant and barscene, and then saely make theirway to the game on the shuttle.A number o local businessesare likely to see a spike in businesson game days with these alumniparking downtown. While morepopular businesses are likely to seea boost in business regardless o the shuttle service, some smallerbusinesses will denitely benetrom the increased oot trac.Tis service will be a welcomereprieve or alumni who areused to coming into town andpaying $25 or a parking spotat a residence in the shadow o Memorial Stadium. On the otherside o this story are the studentsand landlords that had plannedon making money selling theirparking spaces to out-o-towners.“Tis service will probably take alot o the customers that normally park in this area,” said Alec Shandy,a student living in the 10th block o Illinois Street. Tese tenants andlandlords are likely to see a sharpdecrease in sales and perhaps evenhave to consider lowering their ees.Despite the potential drop-of in parking around the stadium,this service is denitely in the bestinterests o the saety and well-being o students and alumni.
— Edited by Heather Nelson 
FILE PHOTO/KANSAN
A Park and Ride bus pulls up to a stop at the parking lot on west campus. Football fanscan ride the new shuttle from downtown to Memorial Stadium for $1 on game days.
City offers football game day shuttle service
CALEB SISK 
csisk@kansan.com 
LAWRENCE
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
Sila and Sami Shalhoub on their wayto a family dinner in Lawrence in Julyof 2012.
 
NEWS MANAGEMENTEditor-in-chief
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NEWS SECTION EDITORSNews editor
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Associate news editor
Emily Donovan
Sports editor
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Copy chiefs
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Will Webber
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Special sections editor
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ADVISERSMedia director andcontent stategist
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Sales and marketing adviser
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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2013PAGE 2ACONTACT US
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The University Daily Kansan is the studentnewspaper o the University o Kansas. Therst copy is paid through the student activityee. Additional copies o The Kansan are50 cents. Subscriptions can be purchasedat the Kansan business oce, 2051A DoleHuman Development Center, 1000 SunnysideAvenue, Lawrence, KS., 66045.The University Daily Kansan (ISSN 0746-4967) is published daily during the schoolyear except Friday, Saturday, Sunday, allbreak, spring break and exams and weeklyduring the summer session excludingholidays. Annual subscriptions by mail are$250 plus tax. Send address changes toThe University Daily Kansan, 2051A DoleHuman Development Center, 1000 SunnysideAvenue.
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Her phone begins to ring,and she looks at the unamiliarnumber displayed on the screen.She almost ignores the call, butaer a moment o hesitationdecides to answer it. As the girl onthe other end introduces hersel,it takes a moment or her torecognize a voice she hasn’t heardin years. Te voice o a younggirl rom Arica she once knew.Te girl’s name is Fatou, andtheir relationship began whenEmily Sharp, a graduatestudent working towards hermaster’s degree in Marketingand Communications, servedas a Peace Corps volunteer inGuinea rom 2004 to 2006.One project she and theother volunteers in herregion worked on was anannual girl’s conerence.Tey brought together younggirls who showed promise asleaders in their communities.It was an eye-openingexperience or the girls, Sharpsaid. Many o them had questionswhile growing up but never hadthe opportunity to fnd answers.Aer attending the conerence,Fatou was inspired to set hersel on the path she is on today. Sheupdated Sharp on where she isnow when she called just a ew weeks ago, which is in Virginiawhere she goes to college.“She speaks impeccableEnglish,” Sharp said. “Shewanted to reach out to mebecause the time we spenttogether at that conerencemade such an impression onher, and it’s something she’s beenthinking about ever since. Tatwas so rewarding or me to hear.”Sharp said meaningul work like the girl’s conerence isone reason she eels her timeserving or the Peace Corpswas worthwhile. She spent hertwo years o service helpingentrepreneurs and women’sgroups start and manageincome-generating activitiesor their communities.In order to be successul inher work endeavors, Sharp hadto adapt to her completely new surroundings. She adjustedto the living conditions o theremote West Arican villagewhere she lived, which includedno electricity, no runningwater, no phones or Internetand little contact with home.Sharp also had to becomeaccustomed to the social norms inher new community. She said shewas surprised to fnd that it wasconsidered polite to stop and greetevery person you passed, eveni you didn’t know them. Peoplein her community were alsocomortable with silence, makingSharp notice that Americansoen try to fll every pause inconversation with small talk.She was asked questions aboutwhat lie was like in America,and many times the conceptsshe explained were unbelievableto those in her community.Sharp recalled sitting with aman in her community on a very hot day and commentingthat back in the United States,people usually just stay inside inthe air conditioning to escapethe heat. Sharp said he couldn’twrap his head around the idea.“It was so oreign to him thatyou would spend all o your timecramped up in an inside spacewhen you have the whole wide openworld around you,” Sharp said.While in Guinea, Sharp’s bestriend rom home was pregnantand sent her a sonogram picture.One o her Guinean riends saw the picture hanging up in herhouse and asked about it. Sharpexplained how doctors are able tosee and take pictures o an unbornbaby, and determine its gender.“His mind was blown. Hethought I was crazy,” Sharpsaid. “I would have thesemoments like, oh yeah, it’s pretty amazing that we can do that.”Sharp, ormer campus PeaceCorps recruiter, encouragesany student who is open toadventure and able to adaptin challenging situations toconsider the Peace Corps.“Te old slogan or PeaceCorps is it’s the toughest jobyou’ll ever love,” Sharp said. “Ithink that sums it up perectly.”
— Edited by Hannah Barling 
CAMPUS
Graduate student shares Peace Corps experience 
KATIE MCBRIDE
kmcbride@kansan.com 
What:
Party on the Patio
Where:
Dole Institute o Politics
When:
6 to 8 p.m.
About:
Kick back on our patiowith some riends, FREE oodand special guest, journalistand writer or SLATE.COM, DaveWeigel. Dave will take audiencequestions ater his interviewand then be available briefyaterward. Board oers new andreturning students. Come meetcurrent SAB members and see theDole Institute. Students only.
Cost:
Free
What:
Anschutz Library Open House &Pizza Party
Where:
Anschutz Library
When:
11:30 a.m.
About:
Stop by KU's most popularlibrary or ree pizza, soda and water.Grab some giveaways and discoverall that the KU Libraries have tooer including academic resources,research expertise and great spacesor both solo study and group work.
Cost:
Free
What:
Spencer Behind-the-Scenes: James Turrell and More
Where:
Spencer Museum o Art
When:
4 to 5 p.m.
About:
KU students are invited topreview the upcoming James Turrellexhibition and witness the skillulinstallation process that culminatesin the exhibition o a large and com-plex work o contemporary art. Thisbehind-the-scenes discussion is aqualiying event in Visual Art or ArtsEngagement students.
Cost:
Free
What:
 Jonathan Stalling & Ben Cartwright Reading
Where:
Kansas Union, International Room
When:
7:30 to 8:30 p.m.
About:
Stalling is best known or his book Yingel-ishi (Counterpath, 2011), which is based upon anEnglish-language phrase book popular in China.Stalling translates those Chinese characters,creating new poems in English. In perormance,he chants them, according to a traditional ormo singing " and speakers o both English andChinese each hear completely dierent meanings.Opening or Stalling will be Benjamin Cartwright,a recent KU Ph.D. whose work Tea & Gin deals withthe oreign concession era in Tianjin, China.
Cost:
Free
What:
Job Search Materials Workshop
Where:
Burge Union, 149
When:
12 to 1 p.m.
About:
Are you thinking o applying or a job? At-tend this session to learn more about common jobsearch materials and how to stand out. Registeror the event at: http://graduate.drupal.ku.edu/ jobsearchmaterialsworkshopregistration
Cost:
Free
What:
A Conversation with Corinne Brinkerho
Where:
Oldather Studios, 100
When:
1 to 2 p.m.
About:
Corinne Brinkerho, Lawrence native,is an Emmy-nominated television screenwriterand producer. She began her career on "BostonLegal" in 2006. She has also written or CBS's"The Goodwie," and is currently a writer andco-executive producer or "Elementary."
Cost:
Free
What:
Asphalt Orchestra
Where:
Lied Center
When:
7:30 p.m.
About:
According to The New York Times, theAsphalt Orchestra is "part parade spectacle, parthaltime show and part cutting-edge contem-porary music concert." This 12-member, NewYork City-based, guerrilla-music orce is knownto unleash innovative music rom concert halls,rock clubs and jazz basements to the streets andbeyond. The expertly-trained members o AsphaltOrchestra combine Western classical, rock,pop music and jazz, and have a repertoire thatranges rom music by pop wizard Bjork and jazzlegend Charles Mingus to rock progressive FrankZappa and Swedish metal band Meshuggah.
Cost:
Student: $11-$12
 
Stop, rewind, ast orward, replay.With just ew clicks o the mouse,senior Chi Vu rom Vietnamreviewed the video o the previousday’s microbiology lecture, tryingto ll her notes on what she missedduring the actual class.Echo 360 lecture capture systemuploads the video o the lectureonto Blackboard, allowing studentstaking Biology 400 to see andhear proessor Matthew Buechnergiving his lecture, as well as thepowerpoint presentation he usedin the class, outside the walls o Budig 130.“I have really bad studying hab-its,” Vu said. “I kind o space out inclass so it’s good to go over it, seewhat he is talking about, especially because he is so disjointed.”Buechner is one o the 308 KUaculty members who are actively using the Echo 360 system. WhileEcho 360 is new to the Lawrencecampus, it has been used or thepast couple years at the Edwardscampus as well as the University Pharmacy School.Buechner, who also teaches at theEdwards campus, said he wouldtry the new system at Edwardsbecause a lot o older studentshave jobs and can’t make it to classevery night.“For the students who had tomiss a lecture, it was really helpul.Tey could watch the lecture, thenask me questions rather than justcome to me and ask ‘what did wecover.’ So it made oce visits moreproductive,” Buechner said.From experience, Buechner knew how useul the lecture capture sys-tem can be or students who use it.“I tend to talk way too ast. I getall nervous and excited and jumparound too much,” Buechner said.“Even the students who went toclass, they’d look at the lectureaerwards and go over their notesover the parts, topics they hadtrouble with in more detail.”Te success in the previous yearsled to the adoption o Echo 360 inLawrence, and it can completely change the traditional classroomexperience or many KU students.Trough Blackboard, instruc-tors can see how many studentswatched their lectures, how longthey’ve watched it and what partstudents watched the most. Tiseedback allows the instructors topinpoint the most dicult materialand tailor the classroom time.“Students want to have moreinteraction with each other in theclassroom. Tey don’t want to sitand listen to an instructor talk oran hour,” David Day, communi-cations manager or Inormationechnology, said. “By changing theway the courses are taught, to bet-ter involve students in the learningprocess, to take them rom beingpassive listeners to active partici-pants in classrooms, the University knows it can raise retention rates.”One o the concerns about thenew technology is that it coulddiscourage classroom attendance,something Buechner considers a vital part o the education process.“I think people get a lot morerom being in that social setting,even in a large lecture hall. Hearinghow other people are reacting is abetter learning experience or youthan just watching a tv monitor,”Buechner said.I attendance decreases signi-cantly, Buechner plans to stoprecording his lectures, but just aera week into the new semester, heremained optimistic.“I had pretty good attendancetoday, and the lecture is online soI was pleasantly surprised,” Buech-ner said. “At least 80 percent o theclass was there today.”Ultimately, the goal o integrat-ing the lecture capture system isto increase class interaction andunderstanding o the material,whatever orm the lecture takes.“I want students to understandthe material and I’m committed todo whatever I can to help them un-derstand it,” Buechner said. “Willit change it or good? No I think you’ll always have room or lec-ture. I think it’s going to change thebalance o what happens duringthe lecture.”
—Edited by Hannah Barling 
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 2013THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSANPAGE 3A
POLICE REPORTS
Last Sunday marked the 115thanniversary o the day KU hiredDr. James Naismith as director ophysical culture.A 22-year-old male wasarrested yesterday on the300 block o 6th Street onsuspicion o operating avehicle under the infuence. A$500 bond was paid.A 29-year-old emale wasarrested yesterday on the700 block o Ohio Street onsuspicion o operating avehicle under the infuence. A$500 bond was paid.A 27-year-old male wasarrested yesterday on the800 block o Michigan Streeton suspicion o being anintoxicated pedestrian in theroadway. A $100 bond waspaid.A 19-year-old male wasarrested yesterday on the300 block o 12th Street onsuspicion o operating avehicle under the infuence. A$500 bond was paid.A 26-year-old male wasarrested Sunday on the2200 block o 6th Street onsuspicion o endangering achild and criminal trespassing.No bond was posted.
— Emily Donovan 
Inormation based on theDouglas County Sheri’sOfce booking recap.
PHI ALPHA DELTA
KU’S UNDERGRADUATE ADVISING CENTER
PRESENTS
FEATURING
PRE
-
LAW DAY
THE
2013
LAW SCHOOL FAIR
75 DIFFERENT LAW SCHOOLS
FROM
AROUND THE COUNTRY
CO-SPONSORED BY
KU’S UNDERGRADUATEADVISING CENTER
AND
PHI ALPHA DELTA
PRE-LAW FRATERNITY
SEPTEMBER 4TH | 1-4PM 
BALLROOM KANSAS UNION 
AND
5th Floor 
POSTER SALE
Most Posters Only $5, $6, $7, $8 and $9
THE BIGGEST & NEWEST BACK TO SCHOOL
 
                  
Where:
Kansas Union LobbyLevel 4
When:
Tues. Sept. 3 thru Fri. Sept. 6
Time:
9 A.M. - 5 P.M.
Sponsor:
SUA andUnion Programs
 
Te ve area studies centersat the University will host theInternational Peace and ConictFilm Festival on Wednesday nightsstarting Sept 4. at 5 p.m.Te rst lm, “Caterpillar” issponsored by the Center or EastAsian Studies. Te estival willeature ve lms.All lms will be screened at theSpencer Museum o Art. Eacho the lms will also have anintroduction and a discussionled by aculty, and in one case anambassador.“Tis is also the theme or awhole bunch o our activities com-ing up this year so we have a wholebunch o speakers coming whowill speak to this,” said JennierDuhamel, the outreach coordina-tor or the Center or Global andInternational Studies. “We’ll alsohave a teacher’s workshop, K-12, sothat local teachers will come, andwe’ll present something on peaceand conict that they’ll be able totake back to their classrooms.”Danika Swanson, outreachcoordinator or Center or LatinAmerican and Caribbean Studies,said the center directors considerconict something that afects eacho the center directors’ regions o study.“Learning about various conicts,the causes and consequences o,and the ways in which we canrespond to conict, is extremely important,” she said. “I we learnrom the past, we will be betterequipped to make choices that canlead to the successul resolution o conict in the uture.”Each department had its ownselection process o lms andspeakers. Bart Redord, theassistant director or the Centeror Russian, East European andEurasian Studies discussed theselection o his department’s lm,“No Man’s Land.”“Tere are a number o diferentconicts in our region o interestthat we could have centered on,”he said. “So we looked at the bestconuence o ‘Do we have a lmthat is good representation orthis?,’ ‘Do we think it will bringin students?’ and ‘Are there otherelements speakers that we know o that will work well with this?’”Te lm estival will end on Oct.9 with the screening o “No Man’sLand.”“We have a really great line-up o lms rom each o the Area StudiesCenters. Tey are interesting,inormative, inspiring, and enter-taining,” said Swanson. “Also, lmis such an enjoyable and efectivemedium to learn about issues relat-ing to Peace and Conict in eacho the participating regions.”
—Edited by Heather Nelson 
ELLY GRIMM
egrimm@kansan.com 
Film festival promotes international learning
CAMPUSEDUCATION
New lecture system changes teaching format 
EMILY WITTLER/KANSAN
Proessor Matthew Buecher lectures in ront o his Biology 400 class. It is capture by Echo 360, a new system that uploadsthe video o his class to Blackboard or students to view. The system has already been in place at the Edwards campus.
YU KYUNG LEE
 ylee@kansan.com 

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