Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword or section
Like this
3Activity

Table Of Contents

0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Disaster Risk Reduction and Livelihoods

Disaster Risk Reduction and Livelihoods

Ratings: (0)|Views: 375 |Likes:
According to the Hyogo Framework for Action, disasters affect over 200 million people annually, causing significant loss of lives, forced migration, and disruption of livelihoods and institutions. The trend over the past 15–20 years points to a greater frequency of environmental, climatic, political, and economic hazards and therefore a growing risk for vulnerable populations worldwide. Disaster Risk Reduction programs and policies offer the potential to reduce the effects of a disaster or shift the burden outside the affected community, yet there exist many gaps and unanswered questions. From 2010 to 2013, the Feinstein International Center, with support from the US Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance, conducted a three-country study of disaster risk reduction and livelihoods entitled “Disaster Risk Reduction and Livelihoods.” The report covers three case studies: financial capital in Haiti following the 2010 earthquake, flood impact on marginalized communities in Nepal’s far western terai, and conflict and disaster management in Kenya.
According to the Hyogo Framework for Action, disasters affect over 200 million people annually, causing significant loss of lives, forced migration, and disruption of livelihoods and institutions. The trend over the past 15–20 years points to a greater frequency of environmental, climatic, political, and economic hazards and therefore a growing risk for vulnerable populations worldwide. Disaster Risk Reduction programs and policies offer the potential to reduce the effects of a disaster or shift the burden outside the affected community, yet there exist many gaps and unanswered questions. From 2010 to 2013, the Feinstein International Center, with support from the US Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance, conducted a three-country study of disaster risk reduction and livelihoods entitled “Disaster Risk Reduction and Livelihoods.” The report covers three case studies: financial capital in Haiti following the 2010 earthquake, flood impact on marginalized communities in Nepal’s far western terai, and conflict and disaster management in Kenya.

More info:

Categories:Topics
Published by: Feinstein International Center on Sep 03, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

12/02/2013

pdf

text

original

 
Strengthening the humanity and dignity of people in crisis through knowledge and practice
JULY 2013
Disaster Risk Reduction and Livelihoods
 
Feinstein International Center 2
 
This report is made possible by the generous support of the American people throughthe United States Agency for International Development (USAID). The contents are theresponsibility of the Feinstein International Center, Tufts University and do not necessarily
reect the views of USAID or the United States Government.
©2013 Feinstein International Center. All Rights Reserved.Fair use o this copyrighted material includes its use or non-commercial educationalpurposes, such as teaching, scholarship, research, criticism, commentary, and newsreporting. Unless otherwise noted, those who wish to reproduce text and image flesrom this publication or such uses may do so without the Feinstein InternationalCenter’s express permission. However, all commercial use o this material and/orreproduction that alters its meaning or intent, without the express permission o theFeinstein International Center, is prohibited.Feinstein International CenterTuts University114 Curtis StreetSomerville, MA 02144USAtel: +1 617.627.3423ax: +1 617.627.3428fc.tuts.edu
Cover photo: Crossing the Mohana river ater ooding. Photo by Poshan Dahal 
 
Disaster Risk Reduction and Livelihoods3
EXAMINING LINKAGES BETWEEN DRR AND LIVELIHOODS:
LITERATURE REVIEW 
Authors
The report is the result o research carried out by the Feinstein International Center at TutsUniversity. The research team consisted o the ollowing individual: Karen Jacobsen, AnastasiaMarshak, Daniel Maxwell, Jeevan Sharma, Elizabeth Stites, and Peter Walker. All members o theteam contributed to the writing o the report.
Acknowledgements
The Feinstein International Center at Tuts University would like to thank the Oce o U.S.Foreign Disaster Assistance/USAID or its support o the Disaster Risk Reduction and LivelihoodsProgramming research. This review would not have been possible without the help o FIC ResearchAssistants Nicole Coglianese and Eric Anderson. FIC would also like to thank sta rom the Oceo U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance/USAID, Overseas Development Institute, Catholic Relie Services, Oxam America, World Bank, CARE, Mercy Corps, the Oce o Management andBudget, and the American Red Cross or their helpul insight into DRR.
DISASTER RISK REDUCTION AND FINANCIAL STRATEGIES OF THE POOR:
DEMAND FOR, ACCESS TO, AND IMPACT OF CASH IN HAITI FOLLOWINGTHE 2010 EARTHQUAKE 
Authors
This report is the result o a collaborative eort between the Feinstein International Center at TutsUniversity and Interuniversity Institute or Research and Development (INURED) in Haiti. Theresearch team consisted o the ollowing individuals: Louis Herns Marcelin , Hugues Foucault, andCalixte Clérismé rom INURED, and Karen Jacobsen and Anastasia Marshak rom FIC. Allmembers o the team contributed to the writing o the report.
Acknowledgements
We would like to thank USAID, Oce o Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA) or unding theresearch and or their support throughout the process. We would also like to express our prooundthanks and gratitude to all those who took time to talk to us in relation to the research. Thisincludes: sta o national and international NGOs in Haiti; local community leaders in Port-au-Prince; and in particular, members o the communities where we conducted our interviews. Wewould like to thank the leadership o INURED or their support: Louis Herns Marcelin, as well asPeter Walker o the Feinstein International Center. We would also like to thank the researchassistants who assisted us in our work: Matthew Herbert and Anne Wanlund. The ollowing studentsparticipated in the eld work: Jephthey Pierre Louis, Josue Posy, Widney Fortune, Jean OnyCelestin, Fed-kedny Exantus, Theresa Guervi, Kassandra Gaelle Alexandre, Brenuma Sebien, Dana Jean Pierre, Michel Fernie, David Jasmin, Dider Deslorge, Jean Sergo Louis, Johnny Fontaine, andMario Maisonneuve. The research also greatly beneted rom the administrative help at theFeinstein Center: Anita Robbins, Elizabeth O’Leary, Rosa Pendenza, and Ann O’Brien. It should benoted that all remaining errors and omissions should be attributed to the writers o this report.

Activity (3)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 thousand reads
1 hundred reads

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->