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Australian English Vocabulary

Australian English Vocabulary

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Published by Mr. doody

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Published by: Mr. doody on Jun 17, 2009
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12/05/2012

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Mr_doody2004@yahoo.com 1
This list is not intended to be comprehensive. Note that a number of the words listed are verylocalised or almost obsolete today.
A
 
ace
- excellent, very good
 
aggro
– (adj) aggressive; (n) aggravation
 
apples, she's
- everything is all right; often modified with
will
as in
she'll beapples
 
 
arsey
- someone showing daring, audacity, and/or cheekiness or experiencingextremely good luck, particularly if this involves a near-miss to injury. In usesince the 1950s. Derived from "tin arsed".
 
not being arsed
- lack of interest, as in "I couldn't be arsed to do it". Also BritishEnglish.
 
arvo
– short for
afternoon
; in use since the 1950s
 
as if 
– Exclamatory rejection. "
 As if 
they're real tears!" or "The case wasdismissed? As if." Commonly contracted to '
sif 
.
 
Aussie salute
- brushing away flies with the hand
Australian-English Vocabulary
 
 
Mr_doody2004@yahoo.com 2
B
 
B & S
- in full
Bachelors' and Spinsters' Ball
- a party/function held for youngsingle people
 
bag
- (v) to denigrate; (n) an ugly woman; both senses in use since the 1960s
 
bags
- to reserve, as in "(I) Bags the last frosty fruit (ice block)" or "Can someonedo the dishes?" "Bags not!" Also used in UK English
 
bail (somebody) up
- to corner somebody physically
 
bang
sexual intercourse (hence "she bangs like a dunny door in the wind")
 
beaut
– (adj) great, fantastic, terrific; in use since the 1910s (n); great thing; forexample, "What a beaut!"; in use since the 1890s
 
beauty
– exclamation showing approval, often spelt as
bewdy
(to representAustralian pronunciation
 
). For example: "You bewdy!", which is roughlyequivalent to "Great!", "Fantastic!" or "Wonderful!". In use since the 1850s.
 
beef 
to have a problem with someone/ to have an issue with another, occuring inthe past. eg: "i have beef with him"
 
bickie
– biscuit. Sometimes also used as a word for a cigarette lighter, after themanufacturerBic. More recently this has become a slang word for the drugecstasy, from the slang
disco biscuit 
.
 
big bickies
– lots of money
 
big-note oneself 
- to brag or boast
 
bizzo
- business ("Mind your own bizzo.")
 
biff 
or
biffo
- a brawl or fist fight. Also in UK English
 
bitser
- dog of mixed parentage, mongrel ("Bits of this, bits of that")
 
(your) blood's worth bottling
- you're an excellent, helpful person
 
blow
- a rest, especially after physical work 
 
bloody
- very (bloody hard yakka). Also in other varieties of English, butformerly extremely common in Australia. Known as
the Great AustralianAdjective
 
 
bloody oath
- that's certainly true; used as an affirmative to a statement, oftenwhen something has been understated; an intensive form of 
my oath
 
 
blue
 
o
 
a fight, brawl or heated argument
o
 
an embarrassing mistake (for example, "I've made a blue.")
o
 
a nickname for someone with red hair (also "Bluey")
 
bluey
 
o
 
formerly, a bundle of belongings wrapped in a blanket carried byswagmen. Also called a "swag"
o
 
a traffic ticket,
o
 
a nickname for a redheaded person (also "Blue")
o
 
ablue heeler(cattle dog).
o
 
a blue singlet typically worn by Australian workers
 
 
Mr_doody2004@yahoo.com 3
 
bludge
– to shirk, be idle, or waste time either doing nothing or somethinginappropriate; to live off others efforts rather than providing for one's self, toreceive welfare payments; to deliberately skip school classes (used mainly byadolescents)
 
bodgy
- of inferior quality
 
bog in
- commence eating, to attack a meal with enthusiasm
 
bog standard
- basic, unadorned, without accessories (a bog standard car,telephone etc.)
 
bomb
- an old mechanically unsound car. "That car is a bomb."
 
bonzer
- great, ripper
 
boogie board
- a hybrid, half-sized surf board
 
boong
- a term lately considered highly derogatory, used for AustralianAboriginals, perhaps derived from
binghi
, once used more frequently (see[1]
 
)"derived from the term for elder brother" (also "bung" in Indonesian dialects).in the languages once spoken between Kempsey Newcastle, viz. Ngamba, Birbai andWanarua.
 
bottler
- something excellent
 
brumbie
- wild (as in undomesticated) horse
 
buck's night
- stag party, male gathering the night before the wedding
 
buckley's
, "buckley's chance" "buckley's hope", "buckley's odds", "two chances:buckley's, and none", "buckley's-and-none" - something which has little or nochance of success; origin uncertain, probably influence by two importanthistorical elements, both of which occured in the Melbourne vicinity. The first,and most frequently used explanation, that the term is a reference to escapedconvict,William Buckley, who was believed dead in 1803 (survival on the run inAustralia being said to be impossible for the British convicts, due to unfamiliarand hostile surroundings and peoples), but he in fact lived in anAboriginal community on the outskirts of present-day Melbourne for more than 30 years. Thesecond likely etymological influence a now defunct Melbourne department store"Buckley's", later bought by a Phillip Nunn.[2]Expression of this phrase oftenalso implies a resignation on the part of the conversing parties as to any perceivedability to influence the determined character who is being ascribed said odds of success, and also implies some risk to the adventurer should they fail.
 
buggered (1)
- tired. "I'm feeling buggered."
 
buggered (2)
- broken, not in working order. "That hose is buggered."
 
buggered (3)
- in trouble, or caught out. "I was caught speeding, I'm buggered!"
 
built like a brick shithouse
- being strongly built; from the chunky look of well-made backyarddunniesof pre-70's and rural housing
 
Bundy
- a nickname for a brand of rum (Bundaberg Rum
 
)

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