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Saskatoon Metis Medicine

Saskatoon Metis Medicine

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How the Metis use Saskatoons as a medicine.
How the Metis use Saskatoons as a medicine.

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Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Lawrence J. Barkwell on Sep 04, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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03/21/2014

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Saskatoon, Juneberry or Serviceberry
:
Metis Medicine
The Saskatoon is a hardy, medium to tall, suckering shrub, native to prairie hillsides andwoody draws. Also called Juneberry and Serviceberry. The fruits are highly prized for food. This berry was called the
 Misaskatoomena
 by the Cree, the Serviceberry or Juneberry by the English and
 Petites poires
 by the French.The Metis, after gathering the berries, would spread them out on tarps or blankets to dry.If the blankets were to be left overnight, they would be elevated on stakes to protect thefruit from animals. The berries were often mixed with dry powdered meat to make pemmican. Sticks of the Saskatoon bush were barked and split, then boiled in sturgeon oilto keep the oil fresh during storage.The fruits have long been eaten by Canada’s Aboriginal people, fresh or dried. They arewell known as an ingredient in pemmican, a preparation of dried meat to whichSaskatoon berries are added as flavour and preservative. The leaves and fruit were alsodried and used to make tea.High antioxidant content fruits like the Saskatoon help to fight cancers and heartdiseases. Several parts of the shrub were used medicinally. Concoctions of the inner  bark and roots were used to treat diarrhea, dysentery, painful menstruation, and bleeding during pregnancy. A warm decoction of the stems and twigs, or bark, was used by the women of the Thompson Indians to treat pain and bleeding after giving birth to a

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