Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more ➡
Buy Now $13.99
Standard view
Book view
of .
Add note
Save to My Library
Sync to mobile
Look up keyword or section
Like this
6Activity
×
×
×
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query

Table Of Contents

P. 1
The Rape of Europa: The Fate of Europe's Treasures in the Third Reich and the Second World War

The Rape of Europa: The Fate of Europe's Treasures in the Third Reich and the Second World War

Ratings:

4.13

(57)
|Views: 146|Likes:
Winner of the National Book Critics Circle AwardThe real story behind the major motion picture The Monuments Men. The cast of characters includes Hitler and Goering, Gertrude Stein and Marc Chagall--not to mention works by artists from Leonardo da Vinci to Pablo Picasso. And the story told in this superbly researched and suspenseful book is that of the Third Reich's war on European culture and the Allies' desperate effort to preserve it.From the Nazi purges of "Degenerate Art" and Goering's shopping sprees in occupied Paris to the perilous journey of the Mona Lisa from Paris and the painstaking reclamation of the priceless treasures of liberated Italy, The Rape of Europa is a sweeping narrative of greed, philistinism, and heroism that combines superlative scholarship with a compelling drama.From the Trade Paperback edition.
Winner of the National Book Critics Circle AwardThe real story behind the major motion picture The Monuments Men. The cast of characters includes Hitler and Goering, Gertrude Stein and Marc Chagall--not to mention works by artists from Leonardo da Vinci to Pablo Picasso. And the story told in this superbly researched and suspenseful book is that of the Third Reich's war on European culture and the Allies' desperate effort to preserve it.From the Nazi purges of "Degenerate Art" and Goering's shopping sprees in occupied Paris to the perilous journey of the Mona Lisa from Paris and the painstaking reclamation of the priceless treasures of liberated Italy, The Rape of Europa is a sweeping narrative of greed, philistinism, and heroism that combines superlative scholarship with a compelling drama.From the Trade Paperback edition.

More info:

categoriesBooks, Reference, Law
Publish date: Dec 22, 2009
Added to Scribd: Sep 06, 2013
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9780307739728
List Price: $13.99 Buy Now

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
See More
See less

04/12/2014

486

9780307739728

$13.99

USD

Activity (6)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
liz1564 reviewed this
Rated 5/5
The Rape of Europa : The Fate of Europe's Treasures in the Third Reich and the Second World War is a very detailed account of the systematic plunder by the Third Reich. It is divided roughly into three parts. The first part deals with the collection of art treasures from every country the Nazis overran ; the second with the recapture and safe-guarding of the art by the Allies; the third with the claims and settlements still going on as paintings, sculptures, artifacts and libraries are returned to their owners....or not.Just as the Nazis planned every aspect of their 1000-year regime for the population of Europe, so they had detailed plans for Europe's art. The very best was slated for the museum in Linz, the city where Hitler was born. Then Hitler got to choose what he wanted for his personal collection. After that, the Third Reich heirarchy grappled for the best of the rest, with Hermann Goering amassing the largest and most impressive private collection. In the beginning, there appeared to be legality to the plundering. Art dealers "sold" the paintings to their Nazi patrons, paintings they had purchased from distressed owners for a fraction of the value of the work. But shortly after, it became out and out looting. The great Jewish collections disappeared and local museums had their paintings removed "to keep them safe." It was an incredible. organized assault on the culture of the overrun countries.When the tide of war changed, the Allies found themselves having to address the problem of the looted art and also the preservation of Europe's architectural treasures. Art and architecture experts were drafted to handle the impossible task of saving everything from Michelangelo's David to millions of books and manuscripts. If they had authority on paper, the reality was much different. There was not enough staff or supplies; preservation of a building, no matter how revered, was secondary to battle objectives; opposing ideas among the various committees to save Europe's art made navigating the bureaucracy a nightmare. And then there were the egos of the experts to contend with. Half these men were rivals in their fields.Finally, with the peace came the decisions as to who got what. Some things were no-brainers. Botticelli went back to Florence. The Ghent altarpiece went back to Belgium. The museums had catalogues for their collections and if their paintings were located, they could be reclaimed. But so many owners were dead. Who had the right to the great Jewish collections when no family members survived? How valid were those "legitimate" sales made under durress? Many claims are still in court and many works still hidden or lost.Nicholas presents the reader with an overwhelming amount of information meticulously annotated. I finally gave up trying to keep names and places straight and just read for the "story." It worked for me. I could appreciate the horror of the willful destruction of Poland's culture without trying to keep the names of the vandals in my head. I didn't dwell on the petty fights among the Allies about whose responsibility a cache of paintings found in the crypt of a church was; I was just pleased that the paintings were saved.The author describes the forest and the individual trees. In all this mass of detail, there are wonderful individual stories. Rose Vallard keeping secret lists of all the stolen works that were stored at the Jeu de Paume in Pars, risking her life every night to photograph invoices, inventories, labels, all the while seeming to work with the Nazis. The heart-stopping removal of the Winged Victory from the Louvre. The moral dilemna of American buyers bidding on Nazi-confiscated degenerate art (Picasso and Matisse) in Switzerland, knowing that the profits would feed the Third Reich war machine, but also knowing that the works would be destroyed if they remained unsold. Nicholas writes a balanced account. She does not spare discussion of Allied doubtful decisions like the bombing of Monte Cassino or the looting and vandalism done by both the Axis and the Allied troops. If there was a crystal chandelier, it had to be shot at by occupying soldiers. Gold artifacts slipped into duffel bags to surface years later in Chicago. Since this book was published in 1995, the fate of Europe's art treasures during World War ll has become a popular genre. Nicholas wrote one of the first books on this subject and still one of the best.
phillund reviewed this
Rated 5/5
A PBS show is based on this book. It sure got me involved in a extraordinary understanding of the art world of this time. The title "Rape" is quite descriptive of what the Nazi did to the art world. I believe the damage is perment even with such hugh efforts to recover stolen art and prevent further plunder.
seoulful reviewed this
Rated 4/5
Lynn Nicholas brings a well-researched and interesting account of the mass movement of art during WWII. She writes in detail of the organized looting of both national treasures and private collections by the Nazis and their various collaborators throughout the conquered nations. We read of the vast amounts of priceless art assembled to adorn the walls of individual Nazi collectors and to fill a future national museum envisioned by Hitler. Into the narrative are woven the stories of wealthy individuals fleeing Europe and leaving their art treasures behind with others being forced to sell at minimal prices.Next we encounter the storage of the treasures in caves, salt mines, attics, etc. as allied armies advance from East and West. Then upon the victory and occupation of Allied Forces began the very sensitive and difficult job of discovery, assembly in large holding facilities, and identification of and return to owners of the millions of items looted from libraries, museums and individuals in the conquered nations.The hunt is still on for many unrecovered items, some brought home by US servicemen, others discovered by those scanning the auctions of Europe and the US and still others found in museums or in odd attics. The thread running through the entire book is the power and tyranny of greed and the unfortunate lives of those within its grip.
ewalrath_1 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
The PBS special from 2006 based on this book led me to read it. Thankfully, I'm in the midst of a WWII kick and I had just finished Crusade in Europe by Eisenhower so the utter lack of maps and coherent description of the Allies' progress through Europe only frustrated me rather than rendering the book incomprehensible in parts. The references to tiny villages throughout Europe without more specific locations than "fifteen miles from the French border" can be frustrating as well. And there are almost no photographs of the people or artwork involved.All that aside- this book is terrific. Ms. Nichols' sympathetic treatment of artists and dealers caught in the German advance reflects the difficulties of the era while her unflinching but also restrained telling of the material side of the atrocities gives no quarter to those who were truly evil. Notably the looting of the Russians is given a more balanced discussion than I had ever read before- Ms. Nichols' access to the Russian archives may be responsible for this. (It was published in 1993, just after the fall of the Iron Curtain). The Dresden firebombing is surprisingly unexamined, either the decision to bomb it (which I assume was opposed by the Monuments Men) or the losses to art thus incurred.
moncrieff_1 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
A fascinating history of how the art treasures of Europe were plundered and restored around WWII
1 hundred reads

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
P. 1
The Rape of Europa: The Fate of Europe's Treasures in the Third Reich and the Second World War