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Table Of Contents

P. 1
Fury: A Novel

Fury: A Novel

Ratings:

3.32

(359)
|Views: 46|Likes:
"Life is fury. Fury-sexual, Oedipal, political, magical, brutal- drives us to our finest heights and coarsest depths. This is what we are, what we civilize ourselves to disguise-the terrifying human animal in us, the exalted, transcendent, self-destructive, untrammeled lord of creation. We raise each other to the heights of joy. We tear each other limb from bloody limb." Malik Solanka, historian of ideas and dollmaker extraordinaire, steps out of his life one day, abandons his family without a word of explanation, and flees London for New York. There's a fury within him, and he fears he has become dangerous to those he loves. He arrives in New York at a time of unprecedented plenty, in the highest hour of America's wealth and power, seeking to "erase" himself. Eat me, America, he prays, and give me peace.But fury is all around him. Cabdrivers spout invective. A serial killer is murdering women with a lump of concrete. The petty spats and bone-deep resentments of the metropolis engulf him. His own thoughts, emotions, and desires, meanwhile, are also running wild. A tall, green-eyed young blonde in a D'Angelo Voodoo baseball cap is in store for him. As is another woman, with whom he will fall in love and be drawn toward a different fury, whose roots lie on the far side of the world. Fury is a work of explosive energy, at once a pitiless and pitch-black comedy, a profoundly disturbing inquiry into the darkest side of human nature, and a love story of mesmerizing force. It is also an astonishing portrait of New York. Not since the Bombay of Midnight's Children have a time and place been so intensely and accurately captured in a novel. In his eighth novel, Salman Rushdie brilliantly entwines moments of anger and frenzy with those of humor, honesty, and intimacy. Fury is, above all, a masterly chronicle of the human condition.
"Life is fury. Fury-sexual, Oedipal, political, magical, brutal- drives us to our finest heights and coarsest depths. This is what we are, what we civilize ourselves to disguise-the terrifying human animal in us, the exalted, transcendent, self-destructive, untrammeled lord of creation. We raise each other to the heights of joy. We tear each other limb from bloody limb." Malik Solanka, historian of ideas and dollmaker extraordinaire, steps out of his life one day, abandons his family without a word of explanation, and flees London for New York. There's a fury within him, and he fears he has become dangerous to those he loves. He arrives in New York at a time of unprecedented plenty, in the highest hour of America's wealth and power, seeking to "erase" himself. Eat me, America, he prays, and give me peace.But fury is all around him. Cabdrivers spout invective. A serial killer is murdering women with a lump of concrete. The petty spats and bone-deep resentments of the metropolis engulf him. His own thoughts, emotions, and desires, meanwhile, are also running wild. A tall, green-eyed young blonde in a D'Angelo Voodoo baseball cap is in store for him. As is another woman, with whom he will fall in love and be drawn toward a different fury, whose roots lie on the far side of the world. Fury is a work of explosive energy, at once a pitiless and pitch-black comedy, a profoundly disturbing inquiry into the darkest side of human nature, and a love story of mesmerizing force. It is also an astonishing portrait of New York. Not since the Bombay of Midnight's Children have a time and place been so intensely and accurately captured in a novel. In his eighth novel, Salman Rushdie brilliantly entwines moments of anger and frenzy with those of humor, honesty, and intimacy. Fury is, above all, a masterly chronicle of the human condition.

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Publish date: Sep 4, 2001
Added to Scribd: Sep 06, 2013
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9781588360588
List Price: $11.99 Buy Now

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hadriantheblind reviewed this
Rated 2/5
Fury? A better title might be Impotence, Poor Decision Making or Whiny Discontent, and the old author has a beautiful women chasing him. Uggggggh. Only a few stylistic twists save this one from one star.
thorold_1 reviewed this
Rated 3/5
A revamp of the tired old formula of the professor-as-victim novel, a Herzog for the 21st century, but with a very Rushdie twist to it. Definitely not one of his major works, but an entertaining read, cleverly pitched just a tiny bit beyond the conventions of realism. There is some lively satire of the shallowness of early 21st century values and some splendidly overdone running jokes. Rushdie is well aware of the old rule that showing a man slipping on a banana-skin or stepping on a rake gets funnier the more often it is repeated. In this case, we have the absurdly beautiful woman who makes men trip over their feet or walk into street furniture whenever she goes out in public: Rushdie doesn't just use this as a throwaway observation of another character, but actually shows her doing it every time she appears, even in the big, serious confrontation scene in the penultimate chapter.There are plenty of references to Bellow's classic (which struck me because I coincidentally read Herzog a few days ago), not least in the names — a Malik is a king and a Herzog is a duke, and it can't be coincidence that one is Moses and the other "Solly". Herzog and Fury are also the only novels in which I can recall coming across the Yiddish word "landsman". Whilst both Bellow and Rushdie start out with a professor who has run away from his wife and child, Rushdie inevitably takes the story — and the resulting balance of power between the sexes — in a completely different direction from Bellow's conventional 1960s approach.
cloggiedownunder reviewed this
Rated 3/5
Fury is Salman Rushdie’s 8th novel. Professor Malik Solanka, historian and doll-maker, is living in New York, alone, voluntarily celibate, angry and afraid. He has left behind in England, Eleanor, his wife of fifteen years and his beloved young son Asmaan. He fled when he found himself standing over their sleeping forms with a knife. There’s a fury in him and he fears he’s become dangerous to those he loves. He’s the creator of a doll, Little Brain, of which, when it became a phenomenon, he lost control: it now stands for everything he despises. We follow Solanka’s tale as he tries to overcome his fury by losing himself in America at a time of unprecedented plenty. We learn some of his own backstory and watch his encounters with a young woman in a baseball cap, his acquaintances in New York and then a woman with whom he falls in love. This novel contains some self-deprecating seemingly semi-autobiographical snippets of Rushdie. There is some lovely prose worthy of this author, but much of the novel is Malik’s stream of consciousness which is sometimes amusing or interesting, but is sometimes rather tedious. I enjoyed the backstory of the Puppet Kings and the way it blended into the real world. Not Rushdie’s best work and certainly not my favourite.
mausergem_1 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
Malik Solanka, the protagonist, is a philosophy professor and a doll maker of fame, who on day discovers himself standing over his wife and son’s bed with a knife. The next day he migrates to America to sort his anger issues. Here he comes in contact with Mila and Neela who help him to sort out his anger issues. In the end Malik is deserted by all the women in his life when he is a better person.The story has a sub-plot where Malik creates a whole set of cyborg dolls and their background stories which is a s good as any science fiction I have ever read. Mr. Rushdie is a brilliant author whose stories have a mystical touch to them. They have real life and fantasy in a very complex mix. [Fury] is based in New York for most of the parts. Apparently Mr.Rushdie did not like America much and has bashed it a lot. Some excerpts“..new hi-how-you-doin’, up-front, in-your face, MASTECTOMY BRA environment: this new cultural hypersensitivity, this almost pathological fear of giving offense.”“A city of half-truths and echoes that somehow dominates the earth.” “America’s need to make things American, to own them, thought Solanka, was the mark of an odd insecurity. Also, of course, and more prosaically, capitalist.”“America was civilization’s quest to end in obesity and trivia, at Roy Rogers and Planet Hollywood, in USA Today and on E!; or in million-dollar-game-show greed or fly-on-the-wall voyeurism..”
librarianshannon_1 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
I always hesitate to pick up a Rushdie as my next read. I have trouble settling in to his language and conventions, having to reread until I can catch his rhythm. This is the first Rushdie (besides Haroun and the Sea of Stories, but that's more elementary) that I could read without turning the pages backward.Malik Solanka is inventor of a modern-day Dora the Explorer who's been turned Bratz by commercialism. Fearing the rage that burns inside him, he leaves his London life and attempts to disappear into the unbranded rush of New York City only to find his internal furor replaced by a much larger external one.I couldn't help thinking of Heart of Darkness and the twisted trip down the Congo, with its Apocalypse Now Marlon Brando looming at the end. As the story escalates, so do Solanka's shadowy strangers-come-friends (accomplices?) and bizarro never-never-land of Fury.
djkoba reviewed this
Rated 3/5
Descriptions of main characters inner turmoil is fantastic; plot falls apart at the end, turning into a mash of improbable and surrealistic affects.
bookworm12_1 reviewed this
Rated 3/5
Malik Solanka is a middle-aged Indian man living in London. He finds himself overwhelmed by an uncontrollable fury and decides to leave his wife and son and move to New York City because he's terrified he'll hurt them. He gained wealth and fame earlier in life when he created a doll called "Little Brain" that became a sensation and quickly spiraled out of his control. Once in NYC he meets two other women he becomes involved with and begins to pursue a new creative venture. I didn't have any attachment to Solanka and struggled to stay interested in the book. I really enjoyed Rushdie's writing though. He goes back and forth between social commentary and inner struggle. The story didn't work for me, but it has made me decide I definitely need to try some of his other well-known books. Any suggestions?"Life is fury, he thought, fury: sexual, oedipal, political, magical, brutal. It drives us to our finest heights and coarsest depths. Out of fury comes creation, inspiration, originality, passion, but also violence, pain, pure unafraid destruction, the giving and receiving of blows from which we never recover."
librisissimo reviewed this
NOTES: Barber's wisdom (~20min): "You always get impulses. If you resist 'em, you stay sane. If you give in to them, you're on you're way to the nuthouse or the pen."The girl has a gooseneck lamp just like he ones my father and mother still had when I was young. Old, but sturdy.
slothman_1 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
Luke Skywalker is still grieving over the murder of his wife, but his niece Jaina and her comrades Zekk and Jag are going hunting for the Sith exerting influence over Jacen Solo. And while Jacen is keeping his kidnapped daughter Allana close to him, her mother Tenel Ka— Queen Mother of the Hapes Consortium and former Jedi— wants her back, and the mission to retrieve her is enough to get Luke and Ben Skywalker back in the line of fire. Of course, their operation takes place in the middle of a space battle where the Galactic Alliance is trying to get control of Centerpoint Station, the superweapon in the Corellian system...The story has plenty of action and continues ratcheting up the pressure in the conflict involving the Galactic Alliance, the Corellian Confederation, and the Jedi Order.
lynnb_64 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
This is the story of Malik Solanka, who is angry. He has a fury inside of him -- a fury that has led to blackouts, which in turn have Malik finding himself shouting in public, and standing over the sleeping bodies of his wife and beloved son with a knife. Partly to protect them, he runs away, but the fury stays with him. He begins to question his sanity, and even wonders if he is the serial killer stalking beautiful young women.As we learn more about Professor Solanka, and about the women who are part of his life, Salmon Rushdie also has us contemplating modern society and the role than anger plays in actions ranging from personal ambition to civil war.The main character is a dollmaker and writer, and Mr. Rushdie uses the plots and characters he devises to explore the themes of fury more deeply. I must say I was less interested in the goings on on Planet Galileo-1 than in the rest of the novel.Very well written, and Mr. Rushdie's plays on words were both entertaining and insightful.Loved the ending, which is like a beginning.....

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P. 1
Fury: A Novel