Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more ➡
Buy Now $8.99
Standard view
Book view
of .
Add note
Save to My Library
Sync to mobile
Look up keyword or section
Like this
2Activity
×
×
×
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query

Table Of Contents

P. 1
The Forest: A Novel

The Forest: A Novel

Ratings:

3.9

(243)
|Views: 35|Likes:
“AS ENTERTAINING AS SARUM AND RUTHERFURD’S OTHER SWEEPING NOVEL OF BRITISH HISTORY, LONDON.”–The Boston Globe“Engaging . . . A sprawling tome that combines fact with fiction and covers 900 years in the history of New Forest, a 100,000-acre woodland in southern England . . . Rutherfurd sketches the histories of six fictional families, ranging from aristocrats to peasants, who have lived in the forest for generations. . . . But the real success is in how Rutherfurd paints his picture of the wooded enclave with images of treachery and violence, as well as magic and beauty.”–The New York Post“THE FOREST IS MICHENER TOLD WITH AN ENGLISH ACCENT.”–St. Louis Post-Dispatch“TALES OF LOVE AND HONOR, DECEIT AND VIOLENCE, INHERITANCE AND LOSS.”–San Jose Mercury News
“AS ENTERTAINING AS SARUM AND RUTHERFURD’S OTHER SWEEPING NOVEL OF BRITISH HISTORY, LONDON.”–The Boston Globe“Engaging . . . A sprawling tome that combines fact with fiction and covers 900 years in the history of New Forest, a 100,000-acre woodland in southern England . . . Rutherfurd sketches the histories of six fictional families, ranging from aristocrats to peasants, who have lived in the forest for generations. . . . But the real success is in how Rutherfurd paints his picture of the wooded enclave with images of treachery and violence, as well as magic and beauty.”–The New York Post“THE FOREST IS MICHENER TOLD WITH AN ENGLISH ACCENT.”–St. Louis Post-Dispatch“TALES OF LOVE AND HONOR, DECEIT AND VIOLENCE, INHERITANCE AND LOSS.”–San Jose Mercury News

More info:

Publish date: Jun 12, 2013
Added to Scribd: Sep 06, 2013
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9780804151023
List Price: $8.99 Buy Now

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
See More
See less

04/12/2014

783

9780804151023

$8.99

USD

Activity (2)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
nordie_2 reviewed this
Rated 3/5
This edition comes in at just under 900 pages, and has been sitting on my shelf for a while now, as I've been avoiding my larger books in favour of the smaller, shorter stories to carry around in my handbag.A few days off work meanwhile have meant that I've been able to finally attack this book! I dont know what I was expecting when I brought it and apart from the size, why I kept putting it off. However this is a story about the New Forest (with some of the characters BEING the forest - such as trees and animals), the families who live in and around the place, the effect that nature has on the people around, and the effect that politics and "history" has on the different needs that different people have for a large swathe of land
gregory_gwen reviewed this
Rated 3/5
I love historical fiction! I would have enjoyed this more if I hadn't stopped in the middle and started reading something else. Reading several of Rutherfurd's books has made me want to visit England, especially the Salisbury/New Forest region.
ltfl_jmls reviewed this
Rated 3/5
I love historical fiction! I would have enjoyed this more if I hadn't stopped in the middle and started reading something else. Reading several of Rutherfurd's books has made me want to visit England, especially the Salisbury/New Forest region.
neilsantos_1 reviewed this
This was good but a lot shorter than his other work, a mere 800 pages, and it covered a smaller portion of history, only about 900 years. Maybe he's running out of things to write about because he's already written about England. Unfortunately there is only one more of his (Russka) that I'm interested in. I'll probably pass on the "Princes of Ireland"
bap1012 reviewed this
Rated 3/5
I enjoyed the earlier parts of the book but found myself wishing the book was over about 3/4 of the way through. I learned quite a bit about the "Forest" area of England and would like to visit one day thus the 3 stars. The characters bored me, especially the latter generations.
clif_1 reviewed this
Rated 2/5
This novel is about a region in southern England known as New Forest and covers a 900 year span of time. The book is a series of short stories about people living in this part of England with the stories taking place at intervals about 200 years apart. The first story takes place in the year 1100 and the last one in 2000. The stories are connected by many common surnames that keep reappearing, the same geographic location and in some cases an amulet that is handed down from generation to generation.I found the first short story to be of the most historical interest since it portrayed a version of the mysterious death of King William Rufus in the year 1100. In Rutherfurd's version of events, the king's death takes place nowhere near the Rufus Stone, and Walter Tyrrell is framed for it by the powerful Clare family. This fictional account still leaves much mystery surrounding the incident, and hints that perhaps the younger brother Henry (King Henry I) who succeeded to the throne could have been involved.None of the other stories were of much interest to me. It reminded me why I don't like reading short stories. Each individual story is OK, but by the time the book is finished the stories become co-mingled in my memory. So in general this book didn't connect with me.
mary6508 reviewed this
Rated 5/5
Mr. Rutherfurd's novels never disappoint me. This is called a companion novel to Sarum, but it is also a stand-alone novel. As always, his characters are rich, his telling of the history of the area is entertaining. I always feel that I want his novels to go on, I guess that's why I keep reading more of them.
fiverivers_1 reviewed this
Rated 3/5
You pick up a Rutherfurd book not for the story, for the plot or characterization. You pick up and read a Rutherfurd book for the historical overview he painstakingly creates. The Forest is no exception to Rutherfurd's formula for success.Following the history of the New Forest of England from the time it was created to the new millennia, the novel coverst the nuances of political, environmental and historical change within the area's confines. Not exactly a spell-binding read, but certainly informative and entertaining.
mazda502001 reviewed this
Rated 5/5
This book was just wonderful and I learnt so much about the New Forest and its ways and the lives of the people who lived there. I love this author's books but they are so huge that it seems to take me forever to read them.Back Cover Blurb:Few places lie closer to the heart of the nation's heritage than the New Forest. The author weaves its history and legends into compelling fiction.From the mysterious killing of King William Rufus, treachery and witchcraft, smuggling and poaching run through this epic tale of well-born ladies, lowly woodsmen, sailors, merchants and Cistercian monks. The feuds, wars, loyalties and passions of generations reach their climax in a crime that shatters the decorous society of Jane Austen's Bath.From the cruel forest laws of the Normans to the danger of the Spanish Armada, from the free-roaming herds of ponies and wild deer to the mighty oaks which gave Nelson his navy, Rutherfurd has captured the essence of this ancient place. Forest and sea: there is no more perfect English heartland.
santhony_35 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
This tome is advertised as a companion piece to the earlier Rutherfurd novel, Sarum, and it is just that. Whereas Sarum dealt primarily with the more urbanized area in and around Salisbury, The Forest deals with the adjacent rural area encompassed by the King's Forest. Very similar in style and scope to other Rutherfurd works, it is still my opinion that his best work remains Russka. Perhaps due to having read roughly half a dozen of Rutherfurd's novels, I'm beginning to appreciate them less and less. "Familiarity breeds contempt." I've run into some of the same thing in Clancy and Michener (and more keenly with Cirque du Soliel) where I found that their later works were less satisfying than earlier efforts. Perhaps this is more an issue pertaining to the reader than the author. If The Forest were the first Rutherfurd work I ever read, perhaps it would be my favorite, who knows. In any event, The Forest is an entertaining and reliable read. It is pure Rutherfurd, and if you enjoyed other works by that author, you will not be disappointed, but will not likely be bowled over.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
P. 1
The Forest: A Novel