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Table Of Contents

P. 1
Lots of Candles, Plenty of Cake

Lots of Candles, Plenty of Cake

Ratings:

3.88

(140)
|Views: 59|Likes:
INCLUDING AN EXCLUSIVE CONVERSATION BETWEEN MERYL STREEP AND ANNA QUINDLEN“[Quindlen] serves up generous portions of her wise, commonsensical, irresistibly quotable take on life. . . . What Nora Ephron does for body image and Anne Lamott for spiritual neuroses, Quindlen achieves on the home front.”—NPR   In this irresistible memoir, Anna Quindlen writes about a woman’s life, from childhood memories to manic motherhood to middle age, using the events of her life to illuminate ours. Considering—and celebrating—everything from marriage, girlfriends, our mothers, parenting, faith, loss, to all the stuff in our closets, and more, Quindlen says for us here what we may wish we could have said ourselves. As she did in her beloved New York Times columns, and in A Short Guide to a Happy Life, Quindlen uses her past, present, and future to explore what matters most to women at different ages. Quindlen talks about   Marriage: “A safety net of small white lies can be the bedrock of a successful marriage. You wouldn’t believe how cheaply I can do a kitchen renovation.”   Girlfriends: “Ask any woman how she makes it through the day, and she may mention her calendar, her to-do lists, her babysitter. But if you push her on how she really makes it through her day, she will mention her girlfriends. ”   Our bodies: “I’ve finally recognized my body for what it is: a personality-delivery system, designed expressly to carry my character from place to place, now and in the years to come.”   Parenting: “Being a parent is not transactional. We do not get what we give. It is the ultimate pay-it-forward endeavor: We are good parents not so they will be loving enough to stay with us but so they will be strong enough to leave us.”   Candid, funny, and moving, Lots of Candles, Plenty of Cake is filled with the sharp insights and revealing observations that have long confirmed Quindlen’s status as America’s laureate of real life.   “Classic Quindlen, at times witty, at times wise, and always of her time.”—The Miami Herald   “[A] pithy, get-real memoir.”—Booklist  Look for special features inside. Join the Random House Reader’s Circle for author chats and more.
INCLUDING AN EXCLUSIVE CONVERSATION BETWEEN MERYL STREEP AND ANNA QUINDLEN“[Quindlen] serves up generous portions of her wise, commonsensical, irresistibly quotable take on life. . . . What Nora Ephron does for body image and Anne Lamott for spiritual neuroses, Quindlen achieves on the home front.”—NPR   In this irresistible memoir, Anna Quindlen writes about a woman’s life, from childhood memories to manic motherhood to middle age, using the events of her life to illuminate ours. Considering—and celebrating—everything from marriage, girlfriends, our mothers, parenting, faith, loss, to all the stuff in our closets, and more, Quindlen says for us here what we may wish we could have said ourselves. As she did in her beloved New York Times columns, and in A Short Guide to a Happy Life, Quindlen uses her past, present, and future to explore what matters most to women at different ages. Quindlen talks about   Marriage: “A safety net of small white lies can be the bedrock of a successful marriage. You wouldn’t believe how cheaply I can do a kitchen renovation.”   Girlfriends: “Ask any woman how she makes it through the day, and she may mention her calendar, her to-do lists, her babysitter. But if you push her on how she really makes it through her day, she will mention her girlfriends. ”   Our bodies: “I’ve finally recognized my body for what it is: a personality-delivery system, designed expressly to carry my character from place to place, now and in the years to come.”   Parenting: “Being a parent is not transactional. We do not get what we give. It is the ultimate pay-it-forward endeavor: We are good parents not so they will be loving enough to stay with us but so they will be strong enough to leave us.”   Candid, funny, and moving, Lots of Candles, Plenty of Cake is filled with the sharp insights and revealing observations that have long confirmed Quindlen’s status as America’s laureate of real life.   “Classic Quindlen, at times witty, at times wise, and always of her time.”—The Miami Herald   “[A] pithy, get-real memoir.”—Booklist  Look for special features inside. Join the Random House Reader’s Circle for author chats and more.

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Publish date: Apr 24, 2012
Added to Scribd: Sep 06, 2013
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9780679604006
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lindap69 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
I have been a fan of Anna Quindlen since first discovering her in Living Out Loud where she shared her experiences of entering adulthood, marriage, children and just living. This collection of essays celebrates a little bit of a lot of living and does not disappoint.
jenners26 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
THIS IS A REVIEW OF THE AUDIOBOOKFirst off, I have to say I was unprepared for Anna Quindlen’s voice. I think that, somehow, I had decided she sounded like Hope Davis (since Ms. Davis read Quindlen’s excellent novel Every Last One.) This made no sense of my part, but I was quite taken aback when she started narrating and I realized she had a kind of gravelly Noo Yawk (or Philly?) kind of voice. I just wasn’t expecting it, and it took me almost a full chapter to get over it and listen without thinking “Wow … this is what Anna Quindlen sounds like?” Of course, I might be the only one with this reaction but I had to mention it.Anyway, with that out of the way, let me tell you about this book, which is basically musings on aging and reaching your mid-50s and beyond. It is basically a “here’s what I’ve learned over the years” book, but Quindlen is so gifted at talking like regular folks or your best girlfriends that the book never feels preachy or saccharine. Instead, she strikes just the right notes of “Jeez, we were dumb when we were young, weren’t we?” and “I’ve still not figured it out but I’m not stressing about it anymore.” Relating her own life experiences and roles (sibling in a Catholic home, student at an all-women’s college, “token” girl reporter for the New York Times, serious journalist, married woman for 35+ years, mother of three, novelist), Quindlen somehow manages to take her unique experiences and make them feel almost universal. Even though I’m not in my 50s yet, I could understand where Quindlen was coming from and loved hearing her views on the aging process. If you’re the target audience for this one, then I think it is a no brainer—find it and read it. If you’re not quite there yet, I still think you’ll find much of value in the book but, like wine, it will get better with age.
bons_11 reviewed this
Rated 3/5
A book that I wasn't thrilled to start yet I finished in just a couple days. It was a thinker book with questions I'd myself like how old would I be if I did not know how old I was? Also what today would you tell your 22 year old self? This book was also a point of discussion with my husband, regarding faith and girlfriends or the lack of either.
livelylady reviewed this
Rated 4/5
More serious than Erma Bombeck, Quindlen still hits your funny bone as she recollects and reminisces about life as she reaches her 60th birthday. I will use this to lead a discussion for our book group.
poolays reviewed this
I love Anna Quindlen. I have read all of her books and a lot of her essays, but this book is not drawing me in. I thought I would read it in an evening or two, and put it down and pick up something else every time. It's boring! I'll try again, it's short enough and maybe I just need to get past a certain point.
dinelson_1 reviewed this
Rated 5/5
I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It had me laughing and crying...many of my feelings, emotions and life experiences were reflected in this memoir. A keeper!
bobvtreader reviewed this
Rated 4/5
I have read almost all of Anna Quindlen's non-fiction and I find her, for the most part, an interesting essay writer. Every once in a while she writes a dud, though I wonder that I think it is not up to her usual excellence because I am a male and do not understand the essay. The book is a collection of essays about women's issues and aging. It is very well written.
rebarelishesreading reviewed this
Rated 5/5
I loved it. What a delightful read ... sure reflects my life (and in a warm and very human way).
marthal_5424 reviewed this
Rated 3/5
A very smooth to read enjoyable book. I would read it again.
rosalita_1 reviewed this
Rated 4/5
I don't know why I dragged my feet so reading this book. I think Anna Quindlen is a terrific writer, both in her novelist persona and as a first-rate essayist. This memoir is Quindlen's look back at her first 50 years (more or less), not in a linear way but rather as a series of themed essays. It's probably not accurate to say that she has lived a charmed life; I suspect she has had her share of heartbreak through the years. Nonetheless, from her warm and comfortable childhood to her long-lived marriage to her now-grown children, Quindlen is a woman who knows how to count her blessings. Along the way, she provides some timely and thoughtful commentary on some of the larger issues that have informed her life, including the various ups and downs of the feminist movement, the way contemporary society treats aging women, and the deep friendships that only women seem to form.

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P. 1
Lots of Candles, Plenty of Cake