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Smitham.intuitive.eating.efficacy.bed.02.16.09

Smitham.intuitive.eating.efficacy.bed.02.16.09

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This study explores the efficacy of using Intuitive Eating (as described in Tribole & Resch's book, Intuitive Eating) for treatment of binge eating disorder. www.IntuitiveEating.org and www.EvelynTribole.com
This study explores the efficacy of using Intuitive Eating (as described in Tribole & Resch's book, Intuitive Eating) for treatment of binge eating disorder. www.IntuitiveEating.org and www.EvelynTribole.com

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Published by: Evelyn Tribole, MS, RD on Jun 21, 2009
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Intuitive Eating for BED 1Running head: EVALUATING INTUITIVE EATING FOR BEDEvaluating an Intuitive Eating Program for Binge Eating Disorder: A Benchmarking StudyLora A. SmithamUniversity of Notre Dame26 November 2008
 
Intuitive Eating for BED 2AbstractStudies suggest that the prevalence of binge eating disorder in the obese populationranges between 30 and 55 percent (Munsch et al., 2007; Wilfley, Agras, Telch, Rossiter,Schneider, Cole, et al., 1993). Research and practice psychologists have come to view bingeeating as a mental health issue. Yet, obese people often attempt to resolve binge eating throughdieting although dieting fails to address the underlying sources of the behavior. This study of Intuitive Eating (Tribole & Resch, 2003) employed an eight-week group treatment for bingeeating disorder that encompassed components of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, InterpersonalTherapy, and Dialectical Behavior Therapy. Outcome results were benchmarked against theefficacy of existing treatments; no significant differences in binge abstinence levels were found between the present study and existing treatments. Binge abstinence rates of the current studywere significantly different from those found in non-equivalent control groups. Self-reportedanxiety and depression were explored as potential predictors of outcome, but were non-significant. The relationship between psychological reactance and binge frequency at pre-treatment was examined and the association was non-significant. Overall, participantsexperienced significant improvement over the course of the study, suggesting that further research into Intuitive Eating as a treatment for eating disorders is warranted.
 
Intuitive Eating for BED 3Evaluating an Intuitive Eating Program for Binge Eating Disorder: A Benchmarking StudyOvereating, restriction of eating, and a range of other dysfunctional eating behaviors arecommon in modern society. New diets emerge nearly daily within the context of an ever increasing rate of obesity. It is no surprise, then, that people who recognize their eating habits asunhealthy or experience discomfort as a result of social pressure to be thin are eager to dietthemselves into health and away from social pressure. All the while, recent research suggests thatdieting may in fact increase the likelihood of obesity (Mann, Tomiyama, Westling, Lew,Samuels, & Chatman, 2007; Reas & Grilo, 2007). Many people continue to diet only to revert totheir previous eating habits when restrictions on their eating become too great. Not surprisingly,these relapses may take the form of eating binges (Reas & Grilo, 2007). Additionally, many people binge eat immediately before starting a diet, seemingly signaling the end of freedom withfood. And for many people binge eating does not solely occur right before or after a diet, butinstead occurs within the framework of an eating disorder.Binge eating disorder is not formally recognized as a clinical disorder and thus only provisional criteria for the disorder are available for diagnostic purposes. The Diagnostic andStatistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR; AmericanPsychiatric Association, 2000) defined the following criteria for binge eating disorder in order to promote research on the issue: 1) Repeated episodes of binge eating, characterized by eatingwithin a discrete period of time, an amount of food that is substantially larger than most peoplewould eat in a similar period of time under similar circumstances, and, a sense of lack of controlover eating during the episode; 2) These episodes are associated with three or more of thefollowing: (a) eating much more rapidly than normal, (b) eating until uncomfortably full, (c)eating large amounts of food when not feeling physically hungry, (d) eating alone because of 

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