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Colourful Australian Gorilla (1868)

Colourful Australian Gorilla (1868)

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Published by draculavanhelsing
Freeman's Journal 1868 (April 25)
Freeman's Journal 1868 (April 25)

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Published by: draculavanhelsing on Sep 08, 2013
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11/07/2014

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Freeman's Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1850 - 1932), Saturday 25 April 1868, page 2National Library of Australiahttp://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article119439736
^^\,:^''#wp^-
v^eifj';.
Mistaken
fob
Thundebbolt.
TheGlen
.
Innescorrespondent
of
theArmidaieExpress
says
:
Ourtown
was
throwninto
a
stateof
ex
citement
last
Wednesday
(15th
instant,')
by
a.
reportthat^therenownedThunderbolt
was
at
the
Tele.'ranhHetel.
Tmmeflia.t.p.'lvnnrf!P
S
accompaniedby
Mr.
Dumaresq,
;J.P.,.
andtheonlyconstablethere(Vivian)
salliedforthto
'do
or
die'
in
the
cause.
To
theircredittheir
ar
rangements
were
quickly
made,
andcarriedout
at
once.
The
constable
seized
the
horse,the
J.P.
,was
athand
readywith
a
revolver,andthe0.P.
S.
confronted
the
robber—
when,
loarid
behold
!
itwas
only
a
mistake.
;
It
turned
outtobe
a
gent'*
nan
(a
squatterfromthe
Dariiiig
Downs)
travelling
through
the
-country,
and
who
presented
our
C.P.S.with
a
letterof
introduction
from
one
ofhis
Warwick
friends.
Themistake
soon
discovered,
wasas
quicklyamended
by
thecourtesy
of
Messrs.
Dumareeq
and
Wyatt.
The
matter
had
been
brought
on
by
one
John
Sullivan,
a
joekey,who:wasstaying
attheinn,and
who,
on
seeiu«the
gentleman
dismount,im
noiediatoly
toldthe
landlord
of
the
Telegraph
that
itwas
Thunderbolt
that
heknewhimwell—
and
to
be
on
thelook-out.
Somekind
friendin
formed
the
C.P.S.immediately,who
gavethealarmatthe
bank,
and
started,
withthoseabove
named,
foraction.
Even
after
the
affair
was
fully
explained,andthe
gentleman
identified,
Sullivan
still
persistedinhis
beingThunderbolt,
andofferedto
lay
odds
thathewould
stickup'
Mr.
Dumaresque
(with
whom
herode
home)
that
night.A
StkangeStory.—Thefollowingnarrative
we
present
to
our
readers
for
what
it
i3
worth,
merely
premisingthat
our
informant
gave.
us
theintelligencein
all
good
faith,
and
appealed
tobelie
ve
mostentirelyin
thetruth
ofhisstate
ment
:—
Patrick
Hogan,
a
free-
selector
on.
the
othersideofthesugarloaf
Mountain,
towardsLakeMacquarie*
was
falling
trees
in
thebush
atabout3o'clock
last
Thursday
afternoon,
when,
iromtne
surrounding
iorestwmenis
thereabouts'verydense,there
camea
creature,in
all
appearance,like
a
man,
butpaintedwiththevariousdevices
inbrilliantcolours
upon
a
red
ground
fromheadto
heel.
The
creature
was
most
beau
tifully
formed,and,
in
all
respects,
resembled
one
ofthehumanspecies.
-It
stoodabout
five
feel
eightiaches
inheight)-had
longtangled
hair,
and
some
ornament
or
braceletroundeachknee
;
 
;
also
some
appearanceofclothesabout
the
waist.
It;
hadineach
hand
a
stick,
which
it
brandished
as
;it
walked
along,'andseemedto
knovy
the
use
ofthe
stick.','
'
Whether
thislatter
circumstance
willaidin
discovering
the
nation
alityofthisqueer...kind
of.wild
-mau,
we
leave
our
readersto
judge.
Hogan
had
a
coaple
of
dogs
withhim,
onean
oldfaithfulwatchdog,which
he
thought
wouldface
anyth
ing,
the
other
a
young
kangaroo
pup.
The
olddog,upon
being
set
upontheapparition,
slunkaway
in
fear,
butthe
kaugaroo,
more
bold,
barked
loudly,
but'
produced
no
effect
upon
thewild
rnau,
who
borethe
continuedyelpingswiththe
utmost
coolness.
Seeing
.thi3,
Hogan
advanced
andmenacedthe
creature
withhis
axe,
having
pieviously
calledto
it
tostand,
an
order
'
whioh
it
treated
with
as
much
disdaiu
as
the
barkings
ofthepup
;
butwhen
it
was
inliklihood
oi:
being'axed'
tostand
it
quickened
its
pace,andintwo
or
three
leaps
disappeared.
Hogan
turned
back
to
hishut
to
get
a
gunwhichhe
hadthere
loaded,but
ou
hisreturncouldlind
no
tracesofthe.creature
though
it
appearedthat
the
kangaroo
pup
hadfollowed
it,
as
its
yelpings
were
heard
inthe
depth
of
t.)e
bush.'Such
is
thestory
that
we
heanl,
and
we
give
it
as
we
heard
it.
Thehero
oftheadventure
is
not
without
an
opinion
as
tothe
gpnius
ofhis
mysterious
visisor
;
hesays
itis
a
gorilla.
Bearing
iu
mind
thedescriptionsthat
are
familiar
to
the
world
of
thehideonsness
of
th^
African
gorilla,
we
do
not
knowhow
toaccoujntforthe
strangeelement
of
beautywhich
formed
so
marked
a
characteristicofthis
so
calledAustralian
specimen
ofthespecies.
PerUapsWie
inversouof
things
in
generalwhich
is
suppdsed
tohave
taken
placp
at
theoldworld's
antipbdes:may
be
thesolutionof
theanomaly.
MaiitandMercury.'Thjk
Y
anco
Murders.—
The.
police
are
still
activelyprosecuting!
tfteir
enquiries
,
and
endea
I
vourrng
tohunt
upthetracks
of
theperpetrators
of
thesehornblemurders,but
weregrefc
tostatethat
up
tothe
present
iimft:theireffortsfcaVe
been
unsucccessful.
Somany
days
had
elapsed
-
after
the
commission
of
themurdersbeforetheburntbones
of
thevictims
were
discoveredthaf
itwasan
extremely
difficult
matter
to
bbfcairi
any
evidencepointing
to
the
criminalityof
an£
 
any
to
the
criminalityof
one
inparticular,
butevery
tittle
of
informaffi
thatcouldbe
gainedhasbeen
diligentlyferreted
out
and
carefully
compared
and
puttogefcheiaudifcis
still
hoped
thatthe
mystery
in
which
this
eventia
enshrouded,
willbe
cleared
un
and
that
;fch'$
guiltypartieswill
be
brought
tojusttcWIthas,
we
believe,
been
tolerably
well
established*that
themurders
were
committedby
mere
than
oneman.
Ifthissurmise
should
prove
toha
correct,
fehe
chances
of
detection
will
be
coh
?.lderTa%
increased,
and
if
the
Government
min
a
case
likethis
it
isits
boundenduty
to
d7
willoffer
a
largerewardand
promise
a
free
nar
don
toany
accomplicegivingevidenceleadingto
^?
Mrebension
and
conviction
of
the
actual
'
murderer^
it
ismore
thanprobablethatthewhole
trufehwill
come
out.
Themra-discovery
:
and
punishment
of
theperpetrators
of
a
fearful
crime
liketmswill
produee
a
most
undesirable
effectupon
themaids
of
thecriminallydisposed
'
and
will
probablylead
to
the
sacrificeof
the
S
or
many
a
poortravellerin
the
solitudesof
the
'
?Jt
1I^heinfceresfc8
of
society
itis
therefor*
in
the.last
degreenecessatjthatthe
secret
mur
dereiashouldbe
hunteddown,
andthe
police
having
done
all
fchafc
couldhavebeenexpected
of
them
in
thiscase,andnot
having
succeeded,
it
becomes
fehe
duty
ofthe
Government
to
follow
uptheirefforts
by
offering
a
large
reward
for
^information
whtch
all
appearances
now
indicate
is
notJikelyto
beobtained
by
any
othS
means,
.??;
'
J-
.'*
DwcpvKRY
or
HumanRemains.
-Onthe
lothinstant
Mr;
Gustdve
A.
^Pf'11^1^^^
.telegraph
works
on
th«
Millers'
Foresthad
his
attentiondrawn
to
what*^appear^d,
at
first
sight,
a
round
white
stone,
but
?:
on
furtherexamination
it
proved
to
be
a
skull
His
curiosity
being
roused
heproceeded'**scrape
thedirt
fromthe
skull
with
a
knife,
anddiscovered
it
to
be
a
portion
of
a
human
beini?
He
immediatelycommunicatedwiththe
police!
whoproceeded
to
the
spot.
The
coroner,
WE
bhaw,
Esq.'
ordered
fche
remains
to
be
exumed'
whentheentire
skeleton
of
3
female
was
discovered.Theskeleton
was
lyingburied
on
thefarm
of
Mr,Joseph
Dennett.Somethree
years
smeea
dram
was
dug
around
the
laud,and
from
'
theaccount
given
by
Mr.Dennett,juniorhe
had
oftenremarkedwhathe
thought
wasa
round
'
white
stone
sticking
outofthe
bank.
It
is
very
evident
theskeletonhasbeenthere
some
years
andwhat
is
most
remarkable,
was
buriedwithin
about
a
footof
remainshasbeen
undercultivation

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