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Anglican Life October 2013 Proof

Anglican Life October 2013 Proof

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Published by Sam Rose
Anglican Life October 2013 Issue
Newfoundland & Labrador

Anglican Life October 2013 Issue
Newfoundland & Labrador

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Published by: Sam Rose on Sep 09, 2013
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07/14/2014

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Bishop Pitman to Retire
Continued on Page 2See:An Interview
The Right ReverendCyrus Pitman, the Bishopof Eastern Newfoundland& Labrador, announced hisintention to retire this com-ing November.
 AnglicanLife
had the opportunityto sit down bishop BishopPitman for an interview.
 Anglican Life:
How doyou feel since you madethe decision to retire thisfall?
Bishop:
I feel it is theright decision. It is the righttime. For me, it was a ques-tion of retiring either nextSpring or now. By doing itnow, the new bishop wouldhave a chance to have aSynod in the Spring and getoff to a good start.
 Anglican Life:
 Whatplans do you have for yourself after you retire?
Bishop:
(
Laughing
)That’s a good question!I do have many plans. Iwant to do some of thethings I have expected oth-er people to do all my life...Lay people in parishes. Iwill continue to engage inministry. I’m not sure whator where but I want to beof assistance wherever Iam needed. I want to behelpful.The first few months Iwant to get my thoughtstogether and not take ona lot of stuff. I have muchconfidence in the Church.I believe many people willstep up and be capable ofdoing what I was doingand more besides.Retirement for mewon’t mean sitting back ina chair...I have lots of differ-ent interests. I want to dothe things I never had timeto do before.
 Anglican Life:
Whatthings during your episco-pacy would you consider challenging for you?
Bishop:
Well, early on inmy episcopate, we becameinvolved in the AnglicanEssentials situation. Somepeople were going off indifferent directions. Thatwas challenging. It wasnot just a challenging timefor me but for the wholeChurch. In hindsight, Ibelieve that process madeus stronger.Some of the other chal-lenges involved personnel.There are no easy solutionsto these challenges. Dealingwith issues in particular toclergy and to lay peoplethat was very challenging.There are no easy solutionsto things like that. We areliving in an age of account-ability and everything ison the table. I think that isreally important. Whateverthe issues are regardingpersonnel, you have to dealwith them and we have hadsome serious issues.
 Anglican Life:
 Whatwere the joys of being abishop for the past tenyears?
Bishop:
There have beena lot of joys! One of the joys has been trying to helppeople see that today is agreat time for the Church.The move that St. Michael’sParish (in St. John’s) hasmade in relocating hasbeen a great joy. The movemade at the Parish of theResurrection (in South Riv-er) made has been verygood. I think parishes thathave been trying to buildcommunity, which is hap-pening more and more...wehave some parishes that arebeginning to grow againwhich is very positive. Partof the joy is seeing this newgrowth and planting someseeds that will grow inthe future. God gives thegrowth!
 Anglican Life:
In your opinion, how has ministrychanged since you werefirst ordained a deacon?
Bishop:
That’s a hugequestion! Some things havechanged dramatically, butthe mission of the Churchhas never changed. WhenI look at how I came intoordained ministry, someof the challenges are thesame. We still have to reachout into the communityfurther and further andnot be cloistered inside ourchurches. That was how itwas when I started and it istrue now. I came in as an or-dained person in the 1960sand that was not an easytime. That was the timethat people were saying,“God is dead!” Many peo-ple finished their trainingat Queen’s and decided notto be ordained. The wholesociety changed and theChurch’s place in societychanged as well.But in some ways, partsof what we were trying todo in ministry in the 1960swe need to do more delib-erate today, particularly inreaching out. When we talkabout the “good old days”in the Church and all theyoung people that were go-ing...some of that was true,but some of that was not.What is true is that the Mis-sion of the Church is for usto reach out and it is urgentand we have to continuous-ly be working at. It is God’sMission, not ours. God willalways be in Mission. Weare not the Mission...Godis and we are partneringwith God in the Missionto the world. That is what“co-mission” means...ourMission together with God.Some things have changed,and society has changedquite a bit but, as we readthe Scriptures, the City ofCorinth was also a verychallenging place to be aChristian. I think today is just as challenging whetherit be in urban, suburbanor rural ministry. This is alife-saving and life-givingMission. It is an excitingtime for the Church and interms of clergy and lead-ers, I believe people aregoing to have to be trainedmore deliberately to en-gage the culture. We arevery good in the cultureof the Church, but we arenot so great in the cultureof society.
 Anglican Life:
You havebeen ordained for over 40years. What do you thinkthe Anglican Church willlook like 40 years fromnow?
Bishop:
I was ordainedin 1967. I think as we con-tinue to move into the fu-ture, we will continue todecline, unless we recap-ture the reason we existin the first place. We needto recapture that visionof why we are here as theChurch. The possibilitiesare endless and I thinksociety is crying out to theChurch to make a differ-ence.The model will have tobe different. We will needto partner with other agen-cies and that is beginning tohappen already. This will
 
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Continued fromPage 1
An Interview with Bishop Cy
be critical to the future ofthe Church, but perhapsmore importantly, to the fu-ture of society. The Churchis the “salt” and the “yeast.It is called to make a dif-ference in the world fromthe very beginning. This isa time of real opportunityfor the Church. Peopleare not negative about theGospel, they want to see itin action. They want theGospel to make a differ-ence in their lives and oth-ers. Someone said a longtime ago, “When all is saidand done, there’s more saidthan done!” People want tosee what can be done.The other thing thathas changed dramatical-ly, is that the priest didall the work of ministry.Lay people were mostlyconsumers, but that is notso anymore. People aremore engaged in the gov-ernance and witness of theChurch than ever before.We came through a longperiod when clergy werethe “be-all and end-all.”That is not so anymore andit is a good thing.The other thing that haschanged quite a bit, is thatchurches have been in asurvival mode. I think weare coming out of that now.We are taking some risksand leaps of faith in reach-ing out to people. St. Mi-chael’s Parish is an exampleof this. We are known to bea church that is always “onthe ground” and making adifference. It is so easy toget into a cocoon and do allthe “churchy” things, butthe church things are outin the world.
 Anglican Life:
 
Is there aparticular portion of Scrip-ture that has been a sourceof strength for you during your ministry?
Bishop:
“For God soloved the world that hegave his one and only Son,that whoever believes inhim shall not perish buthave eternal life,” from theGospel of John. That pas-sage has been very mean-ingful for me. At the heartof it all for me, theological-ly, has been the Cross. Thecost of the Cross and the joyof Easter. That has been mygreatest joy! The Church isan extension of Christ andthis is our great joy!
 Anglican Life:
If youcould give any adviceto your successor, whatwould it be?
Bishop:
One of the thingsis that I will only give ad-vice if the new bishop seeksit! (
laughs
)I have learned that.My only advice is tofocus upon the Cross andthe Mission of the Church.Look at all the possibilitiesaround us. We have somevery skilled and dedicatedclergy (in this Diocese) whoare committed. We needto be able to look moreclosely at reaching out inthis particular time and inthis particular society andbe faithful to the Mission ofthe Church.The question for theChurch is, “Are our besttimes ahead of us or behindus?”My answer is that thebest days for the Churchare ahead of us. So that iswhy I don’t see that we aregone in ten, twenty, or evena hundred years. The shapeof the Church will be differ-ent, but I think that if weare true to the Gospel, thebest days are ahead of us.
 Anglican Life:
 
 What willyou miss the most aboutthe daily work of being aDiocesan Bishop?
Bishop:
What I will missmost is the heavy responsi-bilities of being a bishop. Iwill miss seeing the biggerpicture of the Church inthe Diocese and across thiscountry. I had the privilegeof going to the LambethConference and I learnedthat we are a very diverseChurch.To paraphrase formerArchbishop of Canterbury,Michael Ramsay, I believehe said, “The fact that theAnglican Church looks somessy at times is at theheart of what it means tobe part of the One, Holy,Catholic, and ApostolicChurch.”I will miss the fellow-ship and moving aroundthe Diocese. That wasmore of an interest to me.Throughout this Diocesethere are a lot of very faith-ful people in very humblesituations. Each parish isunique but we have veryfaithful people looking forleadership. I will miss go-ing around to the differentparishes every weekend.That has been one of thebig joys for me. We havea strong group of clergyand I think we can do a lotmore together than apart.We have to work together.If not, it will be very chal-lenging for the Church.The direction to be one wasgiven by our Lord himself.Whoever becomes theBishop, will have to con-tinue to encourage the in-volvement of the wholepeople of God in the Mis-sion of the Church.
 Anglican Life:
 
 Whatwon’t you miss about theday to day routine?
Bishop:
(
Laughing
) Iwon’t miss the foolishnessat times!But seriously, one ofthe joys for me is to see thegrowth and maturity thatis happening amongst theclergy of this Diocese. Thatis really encouraging.Rather than “givingit up,” I see it as “layingit down,” and others willcome along and pick upwhat is good and disposeof what is not good.
 Anglican Life
:
Sharewith us something youaccomplished in your min-istry that was an importantachievement for you?
Bishop:
There are anumber of things, but thething that is most import-ant to me is to encouragepeople to develop a deepersense of Mission.The most challengingplace on the planet for Mis-sion is the neighborhoodswe live in. I see so manyparishes trying to reachout and I know how chal-lenging that is for them.Trying to maintain a faithcommunity and to reachout at the same time is verychallenging. For me, if Ihave made any differenceat all, hopefully encourag-ing people to continue inthe Mission of the Church.As I said before, I havegreat confidence in thefuture of the Church andI have great confidence inthe person God will raiseup to be our next bishop.God has already chosenthe next bishop, and Godwill call us together to tellus who that person is andI believe God is in the pro-cess. This is much morethan a job. I pledge I willnot interfere or cause thenext bishop any grief. If Ican be of any help to theChurch, I will be there. Iam very conscious of theco-mission of our Baptismand my goal is to continueto live out fully my baptis-mal ministry with God.
 Anglican Life
wishesBishop Pitman and his fam-ily our deepest prayers asthey transition into a newphase of ministry.The Electoral Synod tochoose a new Bishop forthe Diocese will be held onNovember 15-16, 2013 atthe Church of Saint Marythe Virgin in St. John’s.
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25th Anniversary for Springdale Church
Submitted byThe Parish of Springdale
Anniversary Gift.The ladies of St. Luke’s Church in Springdale presented these throws to Jill Wisemen of The Valley Vista Seniors Home to be used by the residents for their comfort.
St. Luke’s AnglicanChurch in Springdalecelebrated its 25 anniver-sary May 25, 2013. Thebeginning of an Anglicanchurch was born in 1940by the late Mrs. EdithManual . In the fall ofthat year a visiting clergyfrom the Exploits Parish,Grand Falls and Buchanswould visit monthly.This continued until 1949when Springdale beganto boom and the Angli-can congregation grew.We moved from havingworship in the MasonicTemple to the UnitedChurch and from there toour own church building.The old Orange Lodgewas purchased, renovat-ed and named St. Luke’sAnglican Church after theformer church in LittleBay , it was our churchbuilding for ten years.As the congrega-tion began to grow evenmore, the Pentecostalcongregation did as well.They decided to sell theirbuilding and build a newone. We then purchasedtheir building in April1988 and renovated itto become the AnglicanChurch. May 25, 1988the building was openedand dedicated by the Rt.Rev. Mark Genge, Bishopof The Diocese of CentralNewfoundland.Shortly afterward TheParish of St. Luke becamepart of the Diocese ofWestern Newfoundlandwith The Rt. Rev. StewartPayne the Bishop. We be-came part of the Parish ofSeal Cove which consist-ed of Seal Cove, Westport,Purbeck’s Cove, BaieVerte, Nippers Harbour,Tilt Cove, Round Har-bour, and LaScie. At thattime the rector lived inBaie Verte.In September of 1988,an assistant, The Rev.Kenneth Penney arrivedwith his family to take upresidence in Springdale.This fulfilled our dreamof having an Anglicanclergy living in our town.He stayed until 1991.Following him The Rev.Randy Lockyer came onMay 1, 1992 and wasordained at St. Luke’s,Springdale October 19,1992. This was the firstordination at st. Luke’sSpringdale. Followingthis the Parish becamerestructured again andwe now became knownas the Parish of Westportand included the commu-nities of Westport, Pur-beck’s Cove, Springdale,and Pelley’s Island. Rev.Randy Lockyer becamethe rector of the new par-ish. God allowed us toexperience much growththrough faith, prayers,and commitment of thecongregation. Followingthe dedicated servicesof clergy like Rev. IliffeSheppard, Rev. DiannaBrett Frye, Rev. SandraVoelker- Wock, St. Luke’sAnglican Church becamea Parish of its own andsupported a half timeministry led by Rev. Mil-dred Tobin and presentlyRev Madonna Boone.We are presentlyblessed with two honor-ary assistants Rev. RayBrett and Rev. David Sis-smore. Overall the parishhas seen many changesboth in structure withboundaries and leader-ship with the guidanceof Bishop Mark Genge,Bishop Don Young, Bish-op Stewart Payne, BishopLeonard Whitten andpresently Bishop PercyCoffin.As a congregation wehave been blessed byGod and The Holy Spirithas led us and contin-ues to lead us. To markour milestone on May25, 2013 we celebratedwith Holy Eucharist ,a banquet that was at-tended by ArchdeaconEdward King, retiredBishop Don Young, Rev.Randy Lockyer, Rev. Mil-dred Tobin, Rev. DavidSissmore and our rectorRev. Madonna Boone;various greetings wereread from former clergyand bishops who wereunable to attend.We thank God for Hismany blessings and as welook to the future withhope we know that what-ever God has plannedfor St. Luke’s AnglicanChurch, Springdale, Hewill lead us and throughfaith we will overcome,persevere and run therace with courage as thecloud of witnesses didbefore us. Thanks Be toGod.
Cutting the Cake.The oldest and youngest members of St. Luke’s in Springdale cutting theAnniversary cake. They are (left to right) Jersey Young and Gus and Mabel Oldford.

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