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09-11-13

09-11-13

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Published by: The University Daily Kansan on Sep 11, 2013
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M
y dad le orGround Zeroaround 8:30 a.m. onSept. 11, 2001, and returned onFriday, Sept. 14.I grew up in a suburb 24miles rom Ground Zero witha ather who was a reghterin one o the busiest rehousesin New York City’s EastHarlem. “Te Fire Factory” isa broken down, two-story brick structure, but it was a secondhome to my ather. When hewasn’t there, we were hometogether raising the volumeevery time there was news o are on the V, or listening tothe FDNY re dispatch playingsubtly in my kitchen.On the morning o Sept. 11,I attended another seemingly normal day o third grade atCovert Avenue Elementary School. At 10 a.m. I was pickedup early by my riend’s mother.I didn’t know our country wasin the midst o experiencing oneo the worst terrorist attacks inour history, I was just thrillednot to be sitting through anotherboring classroom activity. At thesame time, Mayor Rudy Giulianiwas issuing an “all-city alert.”Tis meant all NYC reghtersand police ocers must report totheir jobs.Tat included my dad. Withthat, my mother removedmy ather’s FDNY medal, abirthday gi she got him a ew years prior, rom around hisneck and said goodbye as hele or lower Manhattan, notknowing when, or i, he’d return.He was a rst responder andmade it to Ground Zero beorethe collapse o the secondtower. As the day dragged onand the look o ear and anxiety consumed my mother, I grew curious. Our phone was ringingof the hook and the V in ourliving room was blasting with voices o scared and conusednewscasters. Nobody knew what was happening. Somepeople were calling this an act o terrorism; others were calling itan “accident.”Aer our nights, my atherreturned home. We were thelucky ones – some amilies arestill waiting on their loved ones.But he had slept in the rehouse,working day and night, ceasingthe re and rummaging throughthe rubble. I don’t know whatmy ather saw during those longhours, and to this day he is quietabout the experience. What I do
 Volume 126 Issue 12
kansan.com
Wednesday, September 11, 2013
All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2013 The University Daily Kansan
CLASSIFIEDS 9CROSSWORD 5CRYPTOQUIPS 5OPINION 4SPORTS 10SUDOKU 5
Sunny. 10 percent chance orain. Wind SW at 13 mph.
2 + 2 = 4
IndexDon’tforgetToday’s Weather
Too hot to function
HI: 97LO: 68
BRENT BURFORD AND GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Big Jay and Paul Quigley, marketing representative, invite students to vote online or the 2013 Capital One Mascot o the Year. The winner receives $25,000 or mascot costume upgrades or equipment.
BIG LOVE FOR BIG JAY
Students can vote Kansas mascot to victory in national competition
B
ig Jay is vying or the title o 2013 Capital One Mascot o the Year and needs your support.He is one o 16 college mascotsselected through video entries orthe nationwide competition. Eachweek, Big Jay goes head-to-headwith another mascot and eachmatch’s winner is declared based onwho receives the most votes. Tewinner o the title will be chosen theweek o the Capitol One Bowl andreceives $25,000 or their school’smascot program, which could beused or costume upgrades andadditional equipment.Not only does Big Jay deserve towin, according to Paul Quigley, amarketing representative or themascot, but his senior-night tuxedois looking a little worn.“Te reason Big Jay was chosenis because he’s a unique character.Tere’s nothing else in the nationthat’s anything like Big Jay,”Quigley said. Big Jay is the tallest(over 7’4”) and most accomplishedmascot with ve national basketballchampionships under his belt.Big Jay deeated Mike the igerrom Louisiana State University lastweek with 52 percent o the voteand is currently ahead o Rocky the Rocket rom the University o oledo with 53 percent o the votein this week’s match-up. Votingends on Sunday o each week.“He’s kind o ull o himsel. He’scooler than everybody else andhe knows it. It’s kind o hard notto choose Big Jay when he’s thatpopular,” Quigley said.Charlotte Lane, a senior romOlathe, played alto saxophone inthe Marching Jayhawks or ouryears and said that game dayscan be exhausting or the band.Members attend an early morningrehearsal and begin perorming anhour beore kickof.“I know Big Jay was a reminder tome that we were there to entertainand to keep spirits up i they weredown, and to keep us excited untilthe very end,” Lane said.It’s a given that Big Jay shouldwin — he’s rom a school with oneo the best student sections in thenation, Lane said.Preston Randall, a sophomorerom Lawrence, is a running-back or the Jayhawks. He said Big Jay is a great symbol or ans on gameday. “He represents a great schooland that’s a great reason to vote orhim,” Randall said.For many students, Big Jay isa symbol not only o game day spirit, but also o the hard work and dedication that is presentthroughout the University. Big Jay lives and dies with Jayhawk winsand losses, Quigley said.“Tere’s nothing more importantto him than a win or the Jayhawks,”Quigley said. “Big Jay deservesto win because there’s no betterway to show the rest o the nationhow proud and how loud Jayhawk nation is.”
— Edited by Kayla Overbey 
THERE ARE THREE WAYS TO VOTE
 1. Go to Capitalonebowl.com andclick “VOTE NOW” on Big Jay’smascot page. (1pt)2. Each week there is a newchallenge or question. Answer itin a tweet or on Facebook using#CapitalOneBigJay. This week’squestion is, “I your mascot playedon the team, what position would heplay and why?” (25pts)3. Make a video o the weeklychallenge. This week, that meansflming yoursel playing Big Jay’sposition, and share it on Twitter,Facebook or Instagram using#CapitalOneBigJay. (100pts)
“There’s nothing moreimportant to him than awin or the Jayhawks.”
PAUL QUIGLEYMarketing representative or Big Jay
NETWORKINGPAYING RESPECT
Aer six months o hard work,Justin Christian, a senior romopeka, can sit back and watchapplications roll in as his new group,Next Generation Program, unveils.Tis program is the rst studentdevelopment program at the WilliamAllen White School o Journalismand Mass Communications. It isdevoted to interaction with thecommunity and ellow students,real-world work experience andengagement with the journalismschool alumni.Tis program consists o alumniand 20 students rom each class(reshmen, sophomores, juniorsand seniors) who will be dividedinto ve groups with equal classrepresentation. Groups will work allyear or a business, school group orany organization that needs a voidlled.“I a 16-student team with analumni advisor approaches abusiness that they decided asa group they want to help, thatorganization is crazy not to say yes,Christian said.During the year students willcome up with three presentations:a research presentation, a progressreport and a nal presentation,which will be presented to aculty and alumni at J-School Generationsthe next all.Tis program was part o lastyear’s Challenge Day at J-SchoolGenerations. Justin’s team wasgiven our and a hal hours to givea presentation on a design o a 21stcentury journalism curriculum withno unding limitations.Te team’s main goal was tocreate a mentorship program wherestudents would be able to network with other students, talk about theirexperiences and also pass downtechniques learned inside or outsidethe classroom.For a previous major, Christianwas involved in a mentorshipprogram where he was required tomeet with a mentor two times. Tey met twice and parted ways. Tisprocess not only was rustrating atthe time, but also made him eel thathis mentor was too busy or him.Tese experiences shaped whatChristian thinks a mentorshipprogram should be and, betteryet, he thinks it’s a program thatwill give students a more enrichedexperience than his own.Journalism school advisor DanMcCarthy, who has worked withChristian, compared education toa car engine, and said that studentsare the driving orce and the steeringwheel. McCarthy said that studentsare the ones who can say, “No, Iwant to go more in this direction.Te Next Generation Programlets students drive each group:making their own decisions on whatbusiness they will be working with,how much time they spend togetherand how they will complete theproject.As applications are arrivingin Christian’s inbox, he’s a littlenervous, but excited since he isseeing the results o his hard work.Applications are underway andshould be submitted by 11:59 p.m.Sept. 26. For more inormationemail Christian at J.Christian@ku.edu.
— Edited by Kayla Overbey 
ASHLEY BOOKER
abooker@kansan.com 
New journalism program connects students with alumni
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
 Justin Christian, a senior rom Topeka, was motivated to start a student development program that will include alumni mentorship and work experience.
By Dani Brady
dbrady@kansan.com
Daughter remembers Ground Zero heroes 
SEE 9/11PAGE 4
JENNIFER SALVA
 jsalva@kansan.com 
 
Keeping with the spirit o cam-pus construction and renovation,the KU Bookstore in the KansasUnion is undergoing a top-to-bot-tom remodel this semester.Te bookstore will join a num-ber o other campus hotspots thathave been given acelis in thepast ew years, including the Un-derground and Wescoe Beach.Tese projects are being undertak-en by the University in an attemptto enhance the student experience.Te eagerness or the bookstoreremodel is evident in the aces o all o the sta members withinthe building. “We’re really excit-ed about the construction,” saidEstella McCollum, director o KUBookstores. “Tis has been a longtime coming.”Te project has been in the mak-ing or close to three years andshould certainly wow students andaculty upon its completion.Te new oor plan will boast 13total registers distributed amongthe dierent areas o the store. By moving the registers to the cor-ners o the oor rather than hav-ing them lined up in the ront, thebookstore hopes to alleviate someo the congestion that occurredwith high trac in the past.Te KU ech Shop will have itsown register rather than sharingsales space with the rest o thestore. By separating clothing, text-books and technology into theirown areas, McCollum said sheis “confdent that this will createa much better customer experi-ence when it comes to peak tractimes.”Te remodel is set to be complet-ed by Nov. 15. Te current phaseo the design, commissioned by Sabatini Architects and BrunerConstruction, is scheduled orcompletion on Sept. 20.Te nature o the bookstoregives it quite a bit o control overthe planning process or the de- velopment. “We are a sel-undednonproft, so everything that wemake is reinvested into buildingupkeep and student activities,”McCollum said.
— Edited by Emma McElhaney 
Te Kansas Creative Arts In-dustries Commission announceda new license plate as part o aninitiative called “Driving the Arts”in a move to generate unding orarts programs.Te plates have a $50 annual eewith 100 percent o the revenuegoing to Kansas arts programs.Te CAIC has a revenue goal o $100,000 per year, requiring aminimum o 2,000 plates to bepurchased by April 1 to meet thisyear’s goal.Governor Sam Brownback ve-toed to continue unding theKansas Arts Commission in 2011,making Kansas the frst state tostop unding the arts. Brownback deended his decision by sayingthe arts should be unded by pri- vate contributors, not public taxdollars.Tis led to the loss o $689,000o unding or the Kansas ArtsCommission and more than $1million in matching unds romthe National Endowment or theArts and the Mid-American ArtsAlliance towards arts programsand grants in Kansas.Maria Losito, a junior romOlathe studying illustration andanimation, said even i the undsrom the plates do not make upor the signifcant amount lostrom unding cuts two years ago,it might create a positive motiva-tion to start fnding other sourceso unding.Since the unding cuts, arts pro-grams and initiatives have had toraise unding through local tax-es and private donations. Many programs have struggled to raiseunding on their own, specifcally in rural areas, writes Scott Roth-schild rom the Lawrence Jour-nal-World.Losito said she worries that stu-dents will lose interest in art or notattempt to pursue artistic endeav-ors i resources are limited or in-accessible, and might lose an im-portant way to express themselves.“Having an art program helpsyoung students discover who they are and gives them extra avenuesto fgure out what they want to doin lie,” Losito said.In 2012, Brownback ormedthe CAIC, a division o the StateCommerce Department, whichreplaced the previously disbandedKansas Arts Commission.Te Kansas arts community recently celebrated a success inAugust, when the National En-dowment or the Arts restored$560,000 in arts grants to theCAIC. Some o the grant recip-ients or this year include theHutchinson Teatre Guild and theArkansas City Area Arts Council.Selena Cochran, a senior romLeawood studying visual art, saidthat throughout her time in schoolbeore coming to the University,her arts and choir classes were “themost un part o the day, a releaseand escape during school.”“I think it’s something all chil-dren should be able to explore i they want to, and they shouldn’thave to struggle to fnd a way to doit,” Cochran adds. “Tey might notever know that they’d enjoy some-thing like that, which is scary.Cochran said she doesn’t “un-derstand why the arts would beconsidered less important thanother things,” and said she thinksthe arts deserve unding rom thestate.“It makes people explore otherways o thinking, and other wayso processing things,” Cochransaid. “I you don’t have the arts,you’re not using a whole other parto your brain, the creative side. It’s just an important part o lie.Cochran said she fnds it sad thatsome students in schools aroundKansas may not get the opportu-nity to experience arts classes.“For a lot o people, it’s their es-cape i they’re struggling throughsomething. It helps them getthrough dicult times. Everybody should be able to test it out.”Losito said she eels that a loss o arts unding means a blow to con-tributions that the artistic com-munity makes.“It’s great to have people who canprovide beautiul images that willmake people happy,” Losito said.o reserve a Driving the Arts li-cense plate, visitKansasCommerce.com/ArtsPlate. 
— Edited by Chas Strobel 
NEWS MANAGEMENTEditor-in-chief
Trevor Gra
Managing editors
Allison KohnDylan Lysen
Art Director
Katie Kutsko
ADVERTISING MANAGEMENTBusiness manager
Mollie Pointer
Sales manager
Sean Powers
NEWS SECTION EDITORSNews editor
Tara Bryant
Associate news editor
Emily Donovan
Sports editor
Mike Vernon
Associate sports editor
Blake Schuster
Entertainment editor
Hannah Barling
Copy chiefs
Lauren ArmendarizHayley JozwiakElise ReuterMadison Schultz
Design chief
Trey Conrad
Designers
Cole AnnebergAllyson Maturey
Opinion editor
Will Webber
Photo editor
George Mullinix
Special sections editor
Emma LeGault
Web editor
Wil Kenney
ADVISERSMedia director andcontent stategist
Brett Akagi
Sales and marketing adviser
 Jon Schlitt
N
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
news
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2013PAGE 2CONTACT US
editor@kansan.comwww.kansan.comNewsroom: (785)-766-1491Advertising: (785) 864-4358Twitter: UDK_NewsFacebook: acebook.com/thekansan
The University Daily Kansan is the studentnewspaper o the University o Kansas. Thefrst copy is paid through the student activityee. Additional copies o The Kansan are50 cents. Subscriptions can be purchasedat the Kansan business ofce, 2051A DoleHuman Development Center, 1000 SunnysideAvenue, Lawrence, KS., 66045.The University Daily Kansan (ISSN 0746-4967) is published daily during the schoolyear except Friday, Saturday, Sunday, allbreak, spring break and exams and weeklyduring the summer session excludingholidays. Annual subscriptions by mail are$250 plus tax. Send address changes toThe University Daily Kansan, 2051A DoleHuman Development Center, 1000 SunnysideAvenue.
KANSAN MEDIA PARTNERS
Check outKUJH-TVon Knologyo KansasChannel 31 in Lawrence or more on whatyou’ve read in today’s Kansan and othernews. Also see KUJH’s website at tv.ku.edu.KJHK is the student voicein radio. Whether it’s rock‘n’ roll or reggae, sports orspecial events, KJHK 90.7is or you.
2000 Dole Human Development Center1000 Sunnyside AvenueLawrence, Kan., 66045
weather,
 Jay?
 What’s the
FridaySaturdaySundayHI: 79HI: 82HI: 85LO: 53LO: 61LO: 56
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Cloudy. Zeropercent chance orain. Wind ENE at8 mph.A.m. clouds/ p.m.sun. Zero percentchance o rain.Wind ESE at 9 mph.
 
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CAMPUSSTATE
Remodel underway for KU Bookstore 
CALEB SISK 
csisk@kansan.com 
ERIN BREMER/KANSAN
The KU Bookstore is now under construction. The remodel is set to be completed by Nov. 15.
New license plates support the arts with Driving the Arts program
KATIE MCBRIDE
kmcbride@kansan.com 
What:
Volunteer Fair
When:
10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Where:
Kansas Union, 4th Floor
About:
KU volunteer clubs and localprograms table in the lobby to giveinormation on volunteer opportunities
What:
Queering the Bible
When:
7 to 8 p.m.
Where:
ECM Center, Main Floor
About:
A presentation by Rev. DwightWelch on being Christian andchallenging social norms
Cost:
Small donation requested or6:30 dinner
What:
The Role o Islam in Post 9/11 America
When:
7:30 to 9 p.m.
Where:
Kansas Union, Woodru Auditorium
About:
A lecture by Arsalan Itikhar,international human rights lawyer andauthor
What:
Sexy Science
When:
5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Where:
Dyche Hall
About:
Games, activities and snacks or KUstudents 18 years or older
What:
Sand Volleyball Tournament
When:
4 to 7 p.m.
Where:
Ambler Student Recreation FitnessCenter, Sand Volleyball Courts
About:
Six-person team or club tournamentor cash prizes, presented by Student UnionActivities
What:
Potselui Putina (Putin’s Kiss)
When:
7 p.m.
Where:
Bailey Hall, 318
About:
Film and snacks presented by theCenter or Russian, East European & EurasianStudies.
What:
Monarch Watch Fall Open House
When:
8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Where:
Foley Hall
About:
Open house, rereshments, hands-onactivities, garden and lab tours, taggingdemonstrations and bugs
What:
Fabrications or How to Lie with aComputer
When:
11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Where:
Kansas Union
About:
Keynote speech on manipulating moderntechnology
WANT NEWS UPDATESALL DAY LONG?
Follow 
@KansanNews 
on Twitter 
 
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2013THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSANPAGE 3
POLICE REPORTS
In this year’s Miss Americapageant, Miss Kansas, Sgt. TheresaVail, will be only the second militarycontestant in the pageant’s history.
Inormation based on theDouglas County Sheri’sOfce booking recap.
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During a 78-day period duringthe summer, KU Dining Servicesgutted and then renovated theDaisy Hill dining acility, Mrs. E’s.Te $5 million renovation proj-ect began on May 17 and was opento students by the beginning o classes. Renovations to the acili-ty include the addition o stationsthat cater to dietary needs withgluten-ree, vegetarian and veganoptions, additional seating andupdated equipment.“We had a number o things thatwe were getting to the point it was just worn out,” said Mark Maranell,manager o Mrs. E’s. “We certainly did our best to keep the place ingood condition, keep things cleanand in unction but we had a num-ber o pieces o equipment thatwere just worn out. It was time.”According to Sheryl Kidwell,assistant director o KU Memori-al Unions residential dining, theproject had been in the books orroughly ve years, but because o renovations to other dining acili-ties, it didn’t come to lie until thisyear.“Our design construction man-agement team here on campus hasto be involved and then we have todo interviews with contractors andconsultants and all that and equip-ment contractors,” she said. “Tat’swhy it took so long.”One thing that both Kidwell andMaranell said that students havenoticed about the acility is how much smoother the ow in andout o the dining room is.“It denitely has a cleaner, muchmore modern look,” said DaltonKingery, a reshman rom Fredo-nia. “I eel like there’s a lot morespace than there used to be.Another new eature o theacility is the K-You Zone, whichexpanded catering to studentswith special dietary needs, speci-ically those with gluten sensitivi-ties. Kidwell says that in the past,there have been gluten-ree, veganand vegetarian options availableto those students, but were neverprominently eatured in Mrs. E’s.“We actually did a ocus grouplast year with a group o thosestudents or all o KU Dining andwe asked ‘were we meeting yourneeds?’ and ‘where can we do bet-ter?’” Kidwell said. “We’ve alwaysofered it but we didn’t do a good job o eaturing it and now we’reable to do that.”KU Dining Services held a testrun in August with a Pan-Hellen-ic sorority rush event. It was theirrst taste o what students thoughto the new acility, and accordingto Kidwell, it was a success.“Tey were extremely impressedwith the acilities, the diferentconcepts and the variety o oodthat we’re able to do or them,”Kidwell said.
— Edited by Casey Hutchins 
ELLY GRIMM
egrimm@kansan.com 
A 43-year-old male wasarrested Monday on the3600 block o East 25thStreet on suspicion oproperty thet. A $2500bond was posted.A 25-year-old male wasarrested yesterday on the2400 block o AlabamaStreet on suspicion ointerering with the dutieso an ofcer and an out ostate warrant. A $100 bondwas posted or intereringwith the duties o an ofcer.A 44-year-old male wasarrested Monday on the2400 block o LouisianaStreet on suspicion odriving while intoxicatedand driving with asuspended or restrictedlicense. A $1,000 bond wasposted.A 19-year-old emale wasarrested Monday on the3600 block o East 25thStreet on suspicion opurchasing liquor as aminor and having an opencontainer. A $500 bond waspaid.
CAMPUS
BEN LIPOWITZ/KANSAN
Mrs. E’s, the Daisy Hall dining acility, reopened at the start o the school year ater renovations. Renovations included updated equipment and a wider range o catering options.
Mrs. E’s opens with improved options, additional seating 

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