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Volume 6 Issue 9

Volume 6 Issue 9

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Published by: thestuyvesantstandard on Jun 25, 2009
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 Volume VI, Issue 9
 
Friday, February 02, 2007
Free 
The Stuyvesant Standardhe Stuyvesant Standardhe Stuyvesant Standard
T
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THE
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“Your 
 
School,
 
Your 
 
World—Your 
 
 News” 
 
Harvard ProposesCampus Expansion
Continued on Page 3
On January 11, Harvard Uni-versity announced its plan to ex- pand the Harvard campus fromCambridge to Allston, which isacross the Charles River. This plan is supposed to convert over 200 acres of land into another Harvard Square, which will haveacademic and athletic buildings,as well as student dormitories.This proposal looks very benefi-cial to the Allston community because it will create 14,000 to15,000 jobs. However, this pro- ject will take about 50 years and billions of dollars to complete.The proposal, which is stillawaiting city approval, wouldchange Allston in a dramatic fash-ion. First, it will move SoldiersField Road, a major street in Alls-ton, underground. This changewill give students easier access tothe Harvard campus. The planwill create wider streets and 30acres of free space.Harvard’s football stadiumand Harvard Business School arealready situated in Allston. TheJunior Comedy Night took  place on Friday, January 19 at theLaugh Factory near Times Squarefrom 6:30 to 8 p.m. Comediansentertained the various juniorswho attended. The students wereserved chips and soda as theylaughed wildly at the perform-ances.Several students who went tothe event found the experience to be incredibly hilarious. Junior Tracy Mak said, “It was reallyfun. The comedians were great.They really gave us good jokes.”Indeed, the jokes dished out bythe comedians kept the studentslaughing and craving more. Whenasked which joke was the most
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Continued on Page 2
An Interview withOlivier Martinez
Olivier Martinez playsGabriel, the leader of a group of 
loup garoux
, humans who canturn into wolf-like creatures, in“Blood and Chocolate,” whichdebuted on January 26. I recentlyhad the chance to interview theactor along with other student journalists.Martinez was asked manyquestions about his role in “Bloodand Chocolate.” He felt the rolewas a challenge because “[he]was being half-man [and] half-wolf.” He said that he was“sharing [the] role with [the]wolf.”In order to help Martinez andthe rest of the cast learn aboutwolves, they went to a “wolf-camp.” Martinez called the ex- perience very interesting and ex-
Continued on Page 7 
French actor Olivier Martinez.
Junior Comedy Night
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Results of the ColumbiaInvitational
 
Continued on Page 3
From January 19 to 21, TheStuyvesant Speech and DebateTeam competed in the ColumbiaInvitational Tournament locatedat Columbia University.In Lincoln-Douglas and Pub-lic Forum Debate, competitorstake part in five preliminaryrounds. In Lincoln-Douglas (LD)Debate, the debate is one-on-one.In Public Forum Debate, it is two-on-two. There are two divisionsin Lincoln-Douglas Debate, Jun-ior Varsity and Varsity; PublicForum has one division. In each
Freak ChickensProduce DrugContaining Eggs
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www.stuystandard.org
Candy for Sale
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PINIONS
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Parents: Where DidThey Go Wrong?
S
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 P
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Video Game ReviewSpecial, Stuy Voice,The Sports Beat, andmuch more inside...
 pi   oi   t   yf   un d  a i   s i  n g . c  om e  a l   t   s  c  o t  l   a n d  . o g . u
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If you would like to advertise in
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AdvertisingSubscription
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is a nonprofit and nonpartisan publication pro-duced by the students of Stuyvesant High School.
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distributes 2,000 free copies on a bi-weekly basis to the students and faculty of Stuyvesant High School and through-out the adjoining neighborhoods of TriBeCa and Battery Park City.
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reserves the right to edit any published mate-rial. The viewpoints of contributors do not necessarily reflect the views of the Standard staff.Copyright ©2006
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Executive Leadership TeamPublication
Page 2
Friday, February 02, 2007 N
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Please direct all correspondence to:
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Contact Us
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Founded 2001
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Wii Contest Kills Woman
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A contest to win a brand-new Nintendo Wii was the cause of death of a 28-year-old women,Jennifer Strange, who would have been the runner-up of the contest.The contest, called “Hold Your Wee for a Wii,” was held byKDND 107.9 in California. It pitted contestants against one an-other to see which one of themcould drink the most water with-out having to go to the restroom.Contestants were given eight-ounce bottles to drink every 15minutes, although it’s unclear how much water Strange actuallytook in. “They were small littlehalf-pint bottles, so we thought itwas going to be easy,” said fellowcontestant James Ybarra of Woodland. “They told us if youdon't feel like you can do this;don't put your health at risk.” Un-der normal circumstances water intoxication is a very rare condi-tion. It happens when a personintake too much water in a short period of time causing the tissuesof the body to swell with water,which in turn can cause seizures,comas and death if not treated.One of her coworkers, LauraRios, had a phone conversationwith Strange. She said thatStrange’s head was hurting verymuch as she was on her wayhome. “She was crying and thatwas the last that anyone has heardfrom her.” Strange was trying towin one of the consoles for her three children. She was later found dead in her home. After a preliminary autopsy, it was deter-mined that she died from water intoxication. John Geary, vice president and marketing manager for Entercom Sacramento, thestation’s owner, said station staff were “stunned” at the tragedy.The radio station immediatelyfired 10 people, including all of the DJ’s related to this incident.
 
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The contestants started on small bottlesand worked up.
 Junior Comedy Night 
Continued from Page 1
memorable, junior Sam Crisantoreplied, “[the] Asian guy when he[just arrived in] America [and]couldn’t get his Metrocard towork. Too fast, too slow, too fast,too slow… you should take bus! .. . too fast, too slow . . .” Crisantoalso said that “the best comedianthere was the main act with theAfrican American,” who consis-tently threw funny sexual innuen-dos at the crowd.After the show, there was araffle, with many small prizes.Anybody who went was eligibleto win a free smoothie, a Star- bucks gift card worth five dollarsor a free movie pass. Upon en-trance, members of the audiencewere given raffle tickets, and atthe end of the show, one of thecomedians, along with junior  president Michelle Lee, drew theraffle tickets. Mak said, “I wantedto win the Starbucks gift card.”Junior Alvis Yuen won a movie pass through the raffle.Junior Comedy Night was agreat experience for many stu-dents. The comics were hysteri-cally funny and told incrediblyside-splitting jokes. Chips andsoda were served and constantlyrefilled. Many students found theraffle to be a nice ending to theshow. As Crisanto put it,“Overall, this was a fun event tocelebrate the end of a term.”
 
Your School,Your World,Your NewsAre all just a short click away.
Come visit our website.www.stuystandard.org
 
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Friday, February 02, 2007 N
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Page 3
 Harvard Proposes Campus Expansion
 plan intends to also move the sci-ence research and athletic facili-ties into Allston, as well as theHarvard Graduate School of Edu-cation and the Harvard School of Public Health.The plan will also create anindustrialized community. Therewill be room for stores, museums, performance centers and a mall.In many ways, the communitywill be the linkage between theresidential neighborhood of Alls-ton and the Cambridge campus.There are some people whoapprove of the plan, and otherswho are opposed to it. Mayor Thomas Menino commended the proposal for the new community,saying, “The community will benefit with the job creation ef-forts and new amenities.”Although the mayor hasshown his approval of the plan,many people in the communityhave not. Bob van Meter, Presi-dent of the Allston BrightonCommunity Development Corpo-ration, said, “Folks in the commu-nity are trying to figure out howHarvard’s growth can coexistwith a vital urban neighborhood.”He was also a bit uneasy aboutthe plan himself, saying “I think there’s still a lot of unansweredquestions.”Some residents, such asHarry Mattison, are afraid that the plan, if it is carried out, will cutthe two communities apart. Thiscontradicts the original purpose of the plan — to unite these twocommunities. Mattison summedup many people’s worries whenhe said, “Could it be that they’ll[Allston and Cambridge] be di-vided by not that much distance, but in some ways be miles apart?”
 
Continued from Page 1
 Rowers on the Charles River paddle toward an arched bridge near Harvard and Cambridge Universities.
 c  o b i   s 
 Results of the Columbia Invitational
 preliminary round, there is one judge, who decides the winner of the round and gives speaker  points. The number of speaker  points ranges from 1 to 30 and is based on how well a debater spoke. The first two preliminaryrounds are based on random se-lection. After that, the rounds are“power matched,” so that com- petitors debate against peoplewith similar win/loss records andspeaker points. After the five pre-liminary rounds, the top 32 debat-ers in each division advance tothe elimination rounds. The elimi-nation rounds are double-octos,octos, quarters, semifinals, andfinals. In these rounds, there ismore than one judge. If the deci-sion isn’t unanimous, it goes bymajority.In the Junior Varsity LD De- bate competition, Arthur L. John-son High School’s Alexander Castro defeated TJ Golden fromSacred Heart High School to win.Lee Schleifer-Katz of Stuyvesantmade it to the semifinals, losingto Castro. In Junior Varsity, Stuy-vesant’s Khatiya Chelidze and Neha Sharma made it to double-octos.In the Varsity division, Nis-kayuna High School’s Sam Gron-dahl defeated Walt Whitman HighSchool’s Xiaoqi Zhu. Stuyve-sant’s Jared Dummitt and YanSlavinskiy made it to the quarters,losing to finalist Grondahl andHunter College’s Zayn Siddique.Stuyvesant’s Claire Bulger andGeorgia Stasinopoulos made it todouble-octos.For the speech side of thetournament, the speakers aregrouped into groups of about sixand judges rank them. The top-ranked speakers make it to theelimination rounds. In the Decla-mation Speech contest, for whichstudents give speeches written byother people, Stuyvesant’s JimmyWang, Christine Yeoun andKarthiga Emmanuel made it tothe semifinals. In the Duo Inter- pretation Category, for which twospeakers work together a give a performance of a piece of litera-ture, Stuyvesant’s team of 
Continued from Page 1
Rosenbaum & Hon placed fifth.Extemporaneous Speaking is acategory where each speaker isgiven a topic to write a speech onand limited time to write thespeech. In this category SumanSom made it to the semifinalround and Shabil Billah made itto the quarterfinal round. For OralInterpretation, each speaker readsa piece of literature in an engag-ing manner. Evan Kolesnick  placed third, and Miles Purintonand Nina Charap made it to thesemifinal round. Warlito deLeon,Jennifer Lau and Paul Silvermanmade it to the quarterfinal round.The Original Oratory Category isone in which speakers write their own speeches and give them.Stuyvesant did very well in thisdivision, with Maureen Chung placing third, Michelle Luo plac-ing fourth and Evan Schwartz placing fifth.Overall, the StuyvesantSpeech and Debate Team did wellat the Columbia Invitational.
 
Candy forSale
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One in three Americans skip breakfast on a regular basis. Thisis shocking, considering the nu-merous studies that make clear the dire consequences of this ill-advised choice. For Stuyvesantstudents, it is either going toschool early to get the free break-fast available in the cafeteria or rushing up the steps and buying acandy bar from a vendor. Every-one knows an ideal nutritious breakfast is something that is notonly healthy, but satisfying andwholesome as well. But who actu-ally takes the time to sit down andenjoy the lost meal we call break-fast? “I just get some SweetTartsor chocolate,” said freshmanYvonne. Who is the accompliceto the crime of choosing a bad breakfast?It might just be you: the per-son who carries a box of candyaround the halls of Stuyvesant.The consumer can choose fromthe “satisfying” Snickers bar,cubes of sugar known as Star- bursts, or the peanut-buttery tasteof Reese’s Cups. The sugar con-
Continued on Page 4
 Many of what is sold are not healthy for students.
 a  t   e n t   e  pi   s  e  s f   . c  om
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Generation Imitation
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Sometimes the overwhelmingamount of schoolwork and preoc-cupation we have with securing asuccessful future force us to ig-nore the things about our genera-tion that make it stick out from allthe others. Then again the ques-tion surfaces of whether therewould be anything at all that we’ll be able look back on in our oldage and laugh at.When I think of the fashionthat defines our generation, Ithink of Chuck Taylors, multicol-ored tights, and teased skinny jeans. But isn’t that what teenag-ers have been wearing since the1980’s? After looking through anold yearbook from 1985, I’m notsure what I’ll do if I see another  pair of Chuck Taylors again.Vintage clothing seems to be infashion lately, but to me, exploit-ing a dead woman’s clothes justto look like Madonna is a desper-ate attempt to duplicate an earlier age. In accordance with thisview, 86 percent of students agreethat our generation of pop culture borrows from or imitates pastgenerations.As far as music is concerned,I find myself preferring musicfrom decades ago over the musicof today. It’s evident that teenag-
Continued on Page 4

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