Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
E396_1t4

E396_1t4

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1 |Likes:
Published by kamal_k9365
IS 14396
IS 14396

More info:

Published by: kamal_k9365 on Sep 14, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

09/14/2013

pdf

text

original

 
IS 14396
(Parts
1 to 4)
: 1996v77EkmmgTTgyT7 ?lh +h -
Indian Standard
ARGILLACEOUS SWELLINGXOCKS -METHODS FOR LABORATORY TESTING
ICS 07.0600 BIS 1996
BUREAU OF INDIAN STANDARDS
MANAK BHAVAN, 9 BAHADUR SHAHNEW DELHI 110002
October
1996
ZAFAR MARG
Price Group 7
 
Rock Mechanics Sectional Committee, CED 48FOREWORDThis Indian Standard (Parts 1 to 4) was adopted by the Bureau of Indian Standards, after the draft finatizedby Rock Mechanics Sectional Committee had been approved by the Civil Engineering Division Council.The engineering problems caused by swelling rocks are widely recognized, as is the need to test theserocks to determine the type and extent of their swelling behaviour and to measure this for the purposesof design.The methods for laboratory testing of argillaceous swelling rocks described in this standard are based onthe suggested method recommended by International Society of Rock Mechanics.The methods which give an integrated approach to testing, analysis and design are covered in followingfour parts:Part 1 Sampling, storage and preparation of test specimensPart 2 Determining maximum axial swelling stressPart 3 Determining axial and radial free swelling strainPart 4 Determining axial swelling stress as a function of axial swelling strainBecause of the variability, the swelling rocks often require special treatment during both specimen preparationand testing. However in the normal circumstances the methods suggested in the standard should be followed.Part 1 describes techniques for sampling, preparing and storing specimens for laboratory swelling tests ofargillaceous rocks. The test described in Parts 2 and 3 are simple ones providing first estimates of theorder of magnitude of the maximum swelling stress and maximum swelling strain. For rigorous analysisand design only the complete stress strain behaviour as obtained with the test described in Part 4 is acceptable.Since such complete tests may last for as long as four months, first estimates obtained with either oneor both of the simpler tests shall be useful for engineering purposes, for example in preliminary design.Also the simple test allow one to quickly estimate where the most critical zone exists and to collect additionalsamples there for use in complete test. Finally simple test may be used in field control tests during construction.The engineer is responsible for selecting the appropriate tests in the context of design and constructionof a particular project. The test described are intended for practical use. For research on swelling~behaviour,other tests may have to be used.Technical Committee responsible for the formulation of this standard is given in Annex D.For the purpose of deciding whether a particular requirement of this standard is complied with, the finalvalue, observed or calculated, expressing the result of a test, shall be rounded off in accordance withIS 2:1960 ‘Rules for rounding off numerical values (revised)‘.The number of significant places retainedin the rounded off value should be the same as that of the specified value in this standard.
 
IS 143% (Part
1)
:
1996
Indian Standard
ARGILLACEOUS SWELLING ROCKS -METHODS FOR LABORATORY TESTING
PART
1
METHOD FOR SAMPLING, STORAGE AND PREPARATIONOF TEST SPECIMENS
1 SCOPE1.1 ‘Ihis
standard covers the techniques for sampling,preparing and storing specimen for laboratory swellingtest for argillaceous rocks.2
SAMPLING2.1 Collection of Samples2.1.1
To obtain meaningful results from swelling tests,the samples should~have, as far as -possible, the samedensity and water content as those
in-situ
t the timeof sampling. For collection of samples, followingprocedure may be followed:
4b)cld)e)
Rock sample should preferably be collectedfrom core borings. Borings should beperformed with air pressure or, with an anti-swelling admixture (such as Antisol) in thecooling (flushing) water, whichever is bestto keep the sample as close to its natural stateas possible.,For coring, either double or triple tube corebane1 having core dia closer to 100 mm shouldbe used. Care shou-ld be taken to takesufficient sample to prepare at least threeundisturbed specimens and have enoughadditional material for identification tests.Alternatively, block sampling having finedimensions to be sufficient for preparationof at least three undisturbed specimens andleaving additional material for identificationtests, shall be prepared.The core or blocks sampled shall be loggedby a geologist and photographed. Prior tologging, the core or blocks should be cleanedby removing the mud cake. Their conditionsuch as mechanical breakage, presence ofmud cake on the surfaces of core or blockand presence of seems shall be noted. Naturalfissures, if any, should be clearly identified.The sample shall then be wrapped with awaterproof liner such as thin plastic sheetfollowed by aluminium foil and sealed withparaffin wax.The sealed cores or blocks shall be labelledgiving details of the sampling location, depthand elevation.
g)
h)
To reduce breakage of cores or blocks duringtransportation from the field site to the testinglaboratory, the samples shall be placed incontainers and the space between cores orblocks and the container wall shall be filledwith suitable cushioning material such wasstraw shredded foam or paper.Samples shall be protected from frost andextreme heat at all times during samplingand transportation.3
STORAGE -OF SAMPLE
While storing the sample following points shall betaken into account:
a)b)cl4
Storage time should be minimized.Storage in a constant temperature (27°C) roomshould be preferred.The sample shall not be exposed to desertsunlight.If long-term storage is necessary, humidityin the storage room should be such as tominimize any moisture gain or loss of thesample.4 SPECIMEN PREPARATION
4b)c)
1The sampling logs and photographics shallbe examined to select blocks and core thatwill yield the required sizes, shapes andnumbers of specimens.Multiple specimens shall be prepared fromthe same sample. At least three shall be usedfor testing and one as a reference specimenfor determination of water content, specificgravity and degree of saturation. (Theparticular number of specimens for each ofthe tests depends on the availability ofmaterial and on the testing program).Specimens shall be prepared as rapidly aspossible. If machining (cutting, recoring toa smaller diameter) of the specimen isrequired, this shall be done with air-coolingor with an anti-swelling medium (such asAntisol) in the cooling water, whichever isbest to keep the specimen as close to itsnatural condition as possible. In general,recoring shall be avoided. For argillaceousrocks that break easily, the special proceduredescribed in Annex A is to be used.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->