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Second Sunday in Lent.

Second Sunday in Lent.

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Published by glennpease
BY G. F. DE TEISSIER, B.D.


Heb. XII. 16, 17.

Lest there be any fornicator, or profane person, as Esau, who for
one morsel of meat sold his birthright. For ye know how that
afterward, when he would have inherited the blessing, he was
rejected: for he found no place of repentance, though he
sought it carefully with tears.
BY G. F. DE TEISSIER, B.D.


Heb. XII. 16, 17.

Lest there be any fornicator, or profane person, as Esau, who for
one morsel of meat sold his birthright. For ye know how that
afterward, when he would have inherited the blessing, he was
rejected: for he found no place of repentance, though he
sought it carefully with tears.

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Published by: glennpease on Sep 14, 2013
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SECOD SUDAY I LET.BY G. F. DE TEISSIER, B.D.Heb. XII. 16, 17.Lest there be any fornicator, or profane person, as Esau, who forone morsel of meat sold his birthright. For ye know how thatafterward, when he would have inherited the blessing, he wasrejected: for he found no place of repentance, though hesought it carefully with tears.We are taught in this passage of Holy Scripturekow we are to interpret the history of Esau and Jacob.We are not left to follow out each man his own idea,but are instructed by the Word of God, what to think,and how to improve the subject. There is no bettersafeguard against false teaching than to let Scriptureinterpret Scripture.Esau and Jacob were twin brothers, but Esau by afew minutes the elder of the two. This priority of birth gave him, according to human customs, a sortof advantage over his brother Jacob. It made himthe head of the family in succession to his father, andthe chief priest among his brethren : and doubtlessthere seemed to be a likelihood that God^s promiseI114 SEEMO XVLto Abraham would descend as an heirloom to theeldest son.The boys grew : and Esau was a cimning hunter^ aman of the field; and Jacob was a plain man, dwelling
 
in tents. "^ They must have seen much of their grand-father Abraham^ for they were seventeen or eighteenyears old when that patriarch died. They must haveheard of all God^s dealings with him and of tbepromises which had separated him off, with theirfather Isaac and themselves^ from the unbelievingworld around them. Their father too was a piousman, holding converse with God in meditation andprayer, and secret intimations of the divine will. It?would not seem, however, that Esau profited much byall these privileges of his holy parentage. He was astrong, active, energetic man, no doubt, such as onesees about us in the world every day — capable of much bodily exertion, and of high spirits. His wasa rough, sensual nature, which acted very much onthe spur of the moment, without reflection, by im-pulse. There was something fine about him too ; akind of generosity, hastily put out, and soon for-giving. But he lived, as it would seem, for thesports of the field only, and cared little, or nothing,for those spiritual privileges which were his birth-right. At all events, he never allowed them to standbetween him and his pleasure or his will. One day,? Gen. XXV, 27.SERMO XVL 115after huntings he returned faint, and smelt the savourof the red pottage, which Jacob had sodden. In theeagerness of his appetite he asks for this, unwillingto wait till anjrthing else might be got ready.And Jacob, ^ the Supplanter,' grants him his request,on condition that he should forego his right asthe eldest -bom. It is clear from all this, thatJacob thought a great deal more than Esau aboutthe birthright — and, indeed, all quiet homely peoplelike Jacob, as they have more time for reflection, sohave, generally, deeper thoughts and feelings than
 
those, the energies of whose life are spent in bodilyexercise: ''for bodily exercise,^' writes the ApostlePaul, ''profiteth to a small extent, but godliness isprofitable unto all things, having promise of the lifethat now is, and of that which is to come.''* Yes,Jacob thought ia great deal more, and must haveielieved a great deal more, than Esau, To him, to beihe heir of GoA^b promise, to he partner with Abrahamin God's covenant, to be the channel of blessings to allthe nations of the earth, were things of highest mo-ment, worthy of his utmost endeavours, if so theymight be attained. And yet it was no great effort onJacob's part, though there may have been some self-denial. Esau's levity, Esau's recklessness, threw athis brother's feet that which he would have purchasedat great cost. Behold, says Esau, / am at the point to* I Tim, iv. 8.I 2116 SERMO XVI.die : and what good shall this birthright do to me? Jnihe sold his birthright — ^with a most solemn oath — untoJacob. * Esau looked only to the presenty to the satis-faction of his hunger ; Jacob looked onward into thefuture, I dare say Esau^s character was of that kindwhich the men of this world admire most : but it wi8Jacob that found God's blessing.The text tells us that on Esau's part there wwprofaneness, because he despised his birthright; andthat, by and by, when the time came for his ageAfather to transmit, as it were, the blessing of tb^^Divine promise on to one of his two sons, thongt^Isaac loved Esau best, and Esau would fain har-^forgotten his oath to Jacob and the impious sale (k^his birthright, yet no recovery could be made, am^the blessing, filched from him by deceit, was con-^^

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