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Introduction to the Incident Command System for Higher Education

Introduction to the Incident Command System for Higher Education

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Published by John Simmons
Presented as part of an online course on school safety. This is a concise summary of the National Incident Management (NIMS) course, ICS 100.HE, Introduction to the Incident Command System for Higher Education. The course introduces the Incident Command System (ICS) and provides the foundation for higher level ICS training. This course describes the history, features and principles, and organizational structure of ICS. It also explains the relationship between ICS and the National Incident Management System (NIMS). This course uses the same objectives and content as other ICS courses with higher education examples and exercises.

Course Objectives

At the completion of this course, you should be familiar with:

ICS applications in incidents at higher education institutions

ICS organizational principles and elements

ICS position and responsibilities

ICS facilities and functions

ICS planning.

In addition, you will learn the steps you should take to be accountable for your actions during an incident.

Primary Audience

The primary audience includes persons involved with emergency planning, response and/or recovery efforts for higher education institutions.
Presented as part of an online course on school safety. This is a concise summary of the National Incident Management (NIMS) course, ICS 100.HE, Introduction to the Incident Command System for Higher Education. The course introduces the Incident Command System (ICS) and provides the foundation for higher level ICS training. This course describes the history, features and principles, and organizational structure of ICS. It also explains the relationship between ICS and the National Incident Management System (NIMS). This course uses the same objectives and content as other ICS courses with higher education examples and exercises.

Course Objectives

At the completion of this course, you should be familiar with:

ICS applications in incidents at higher education institutions

ICS organizational principles and elements

ICS position and responsibilities

ICS facilities and functions

ICS planning.

In addition, you will learn the steps you should take to be accountable for your actions during an incident.

Primary Audience

The primary audience includes persons involved with emergency planning, response and/or recovery efforts for higher education institutions.

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Published by: John Simmons on Jun 26, 2009
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Introduction to the Incident Command System for HIGHER EDUCATION
IS-100.HE Course Summary
 
Course Summary
Lesson 1: Course Welcome
Incident Command System: Promoting Safer Higher Education Settings
Each year, natural disasters such as earthquakes, floods, and severe storms affect our communities. Health-related incidents such as flu outbreaks and food-borne diseases can threaten all of us. Unfortunately, institutes of higher education are not immune from these threats and others, such as intruders, crime, and violence. And accidents, whether in research labs, sporting venues, or on campus shuttles, may occur. When Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast in 2005, the University of Southern Mississippi incurred an estimated $57 million, and the storm cost Tulane University more than $200 million in damages. Higher education institutes across the region were affected, not just by the structural damages, but also by setbacks in their scientific research and medical developments.Given today’s threats, higher education institutions must be prepared to respond in partnership with local, State, tribal, and Federal agencies. As partners, you must respond together in a seamless, coordinated fashion using the same terminology and approach. The Incident Command System, or ICS, is a standardized, on-scene, all-hazard incident management approach. ICS allows higher-education personnel and community responders to adopt an integrated organizational structure that matches the complexities and demands of the incidents without being hindered by jurisdictional boundaries. With institutes of higher education blending into the larger community response system, ICS allows all involved to know their roles and work together, without jeopardizing anyone’s voice or authority.The ICS structure is flexible. It can grow or shrink to meet different needs. This flexibility makes it a very cost-effective and efficient management approach for both small and large situations. In this course, you’ll learn ICS principles that can be applied to higher-education settings. And, more importantly, you’ll be better able to interface with other community responders. 
Course Goals
The overall course goal is to promote campus safety by:Familiarizing you with how ICS principles can be applied in incidents at higher education instutions.Preparing you to interface with community response personnel.IS-100 for Higher Education follows the National Incident Management System (NIMS) guidelines. Descriptions and details about the other ICS courses in the series can be found at: http://training.fema.gov 
Overall Course Objectives
At the completion of this course, you should be familiar with:ICS applications in incidents at higher education institutions.ICS organizational principles and elements.ICS positions and responsibilities.ICS facilities and functions.ICS planning.
 
In addition, you will learn the steps you should take to be accountable for your actions during an incident. 
Lesson 2: ICS Overview
Lesson Overview
This lesson introduces you to:The development of the Incident Command System (ICS).The benefits of ICS.The ICS mandates.The applications of ICS in higher education settings. 
Lesson Objectives
By the end of this lesson, you should be able to:Identify three purposes of ICS. Identify the requirements to use ICS.  
What Is an Incident?
An
incident
is an occurrence or event, natural or human-caused, that requires a response to protect life or property.Examples of the types of incidents that can occur at higher education institutions include:Bomb threat/detonation (e.g., 1970 University of Wisconsin – Madison bombing)Hostage situation (e.g., 1992 Concordia University massacre)Fire (e.g., 2007 Pepperdine University fire; 1999 Texas A&M bonfire collapse)Hazardous materials release (e.g., 2008 train derailment near Southern Arkansas University)Severe weather (e.g., 2008 Union University tornado)Earthquake (e.g., 1994 Cal State Northridge earthquake)Armed intruder on campus (e.g., 2007 Virginia Tech massacre) 
What Is ICS?
The Incident Command System (ICS) is a standardized, on-scene, all-hazard incident management approach. ICS:Is based on proven incident management practices. Defines incident response organizational concepts and structures.Consists of procedures for managing personnel, facilities, equipment, and communications.Is used throughout the lifecycle of an incident (e.g., from threat to parent reunification). 

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