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A NEW-YEAR'S SERMON.

A NEW-YEAR'S SERMON.

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Published by glennpease

BY T. H. STOCKTON.


"What shall I render unto the Lord for all His benefits toward me? I
will take the cup of salvation, and call npon the name of the Lord. I
will pay my vows unto the Lord now in the presence of all his people." — Fsaui oxii: 12, 18, 14.

BY T. H. STOCKTON.


"What shall I render unto the Lord for all His benefits toward me? I
will take the cup of salvation, and call npon the name of the Lord. I
will pay my vows unto the Lord now in the presence of all his people." — Fsaui oxii: 12, 18, 14.

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Published by: glennpease on Sep 16, 2013
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A EW-YEAR'S SERMO.BY T. H. STOCKTO."What shall I render unto the Lord for all His benefits toward me? Iwill take the cup of salvation, and call npon the name of the Lord. Iwill pay my vows unto the Lord now in the presence of all hispeople." — Fsaui oxii: 12, 18, 14.I saw the Old Year. He was lying on a bed of gathered leaves* The grass around was brown andwithered; save here and there, close by the edge of the «now-patches, where it retained somewhat of itsgreenness. The turf was almost as hard as the pike — the smooth and stony pike, that glared in the lamp-light, and rung under the rattling iron hoofs and wheelsof the passing mail. Of course, it was a secluded spot :away from the tide, with its ships and steamboats ; andaway from the wire, the rail, and the whistle. Thespring gurgled out from the hill-side; but was almosthidden by the long icicles that hung thick from thempsa-line, on the front of the over-jutting rock, downto the very basin of the fountain : nor was it seen lobg,for, as it came out between the icicles, it slipped underthe ice that covered its channel, and again found itself almost as much in the dark as it was before it escapedfrom the inner crevices of the hill. Over the rudecouch of the dying Year, the trees spread their leafless,enow-sprinkled branches, as though they would gladlyhave sheltered him if they could; and the breeze(179)180 A new-year's sermon.
 
moaned by his side, as tenderly as though a woman'ssympathy had touched it into piteous sweetness. Theair was very keen, and very clear: and the barking of »the distant watch dog, startled by that passing mail,sounded loud and fierce, as if on the very border of the glen.That glen was thronged with an almost innumerablespiritual multitude. The four seasons were there. Thetwelve months were there. The fifty-two weeks werethere. Three hundred and sixty-five days were there.Three hundred and sixty-five nights were there. earlynine thousand hours were there. More than half amillion minutes were there. And more than thirtymillions of seconds were there. The seasons were dis-tinguished by the varied color of their robes — white,green, yellow, and purple. The months had a fillet of silver net-work on every forehead, adorned with acrescent of shining pearl. The weeks wore a seven-huedgirdle, with a brilliant clasp— adorned with an altar,olive-branch and trumpet. The days bore an imageof the sun on every breast-plate. The nights held a star,downward, on the head of every sceptre. The hours 7minutes, and seconds, carried each a miniature diamondchronometer: those of the hours, with an hour-handalone ; those of the minutes, with a minute-hand alone ;and those of the seconds, with a second-hand alone.The pale Patriarch, thus surrounded by his immensehost of descendants, summoned me into his immediatepresence. I passed through the parted lines, and kneltby his humble pallet. "I have called you hither" — said he — "not for your own sake alone, but, for thesake of the church and congregation to which youminister. I have called you to commit to you, forthem, my last and most solemn message. I am onlyA KEW-YEARS SERMO.
 
181one of the six thousand Princes of Time. Time is theson of eternity. Eternity is the son of God. ext tohis being the Father of the Lord Jesus Christ, the mostglorious title the Almighty bears, is that of the Fatherof eternity! From eternity, down to the youngestsecond, all ages, and years, and seasons, and months, andweeks, and days, and nights, and hours, and minutes, arehis messengers: intrusted with his richest benefits, andcommissioned to bear them to man. My mission, likethat of my predecessors, is ended. Before their de-parture, they reminded you of God's goodness. Beforemy departure, I remind you of the same. My officehas been one of ceaseless love. If you marvel that Iam encompassed by such a host, I have only to informyou, that they have been my faithful assistants, as wellas my affectionate children; and that the reason of their multitude is the multitude of God's benefitsto man. A smaller number would fail to distributehis abounding mercies. There is not one, in all thisarray, who has not been thus employed.""Ere I die" — he continued — "I will question themin your presence ; and you must report their testimonyto the worshippers in the sanctuary :" Seasons ! — What have you given to man ?" Andthe four Seasons answered — " God's benefits! 19"Months! — What have you given to man?" Andthe twelve Months answered — "God's benefits!""Weeks! — What have you given to man?" Andthe fifty-two Weeks answered — "God's benefits!"

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