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Singerpaper FINAL 9-13-13

Singerpaper FINAL 9-13-13

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Published by hprplaw
Jeff Singer white paper 2013, Housing Our Neighbors.
Jeff Singer white paper 2013, Housing Our Neighbors.

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Published by: hprplaw on Sep 16, 2013
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11/01/2013

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Housing Our Neighbors:The National Housing Trust Fund and Affordable Housing
A White Paper
i
 By Jeff Singer
ii
 
"As the Cheshire Cat tells Alice
 — 
if you don't know where you want to go, then any path will do.Why give priority, we are asked again and again, to any one reform over others?"Bertell Ollman
 
 Jacob Riis, Men's Lodging Room in the West 47th Street Station, c. 1892
History says, Don‘t hope
 On this side of the grave.But then, once in a lifetimeThe longed-for tidal waveOf justice can rise up,And hope and history rhyme.Seamus Heaney,
“The Cure at Troy”
 
i
This White Paper is generously sponsored by Jane Harrison.
ii
The author is a former social worker at the Baltimore City Department of Social Services and Health Care for the Homeless, where healso served as President and CEO from 1998-2011; he currently teaches and learns at the University of Maryland School of Social Work.
 
 
2
Table of Contents
I. Introduction ...................................................................................................................3II. Homelessness, Housing, and Poverty in BaltimoreHomelessness .................................................................................................................6 National Numbers ..........................................................................................................7Local Numbers ...............................................................................................................7Housing ..........................................................................................................................9Public Housing .............................................................................................................14Poverty and Incomes ....................................................................................................20Baltimore and Its Neighborhoods ................................................................................25III. Vacant Housing ............................................................................................................29IV. Inclusionary Housing ...................................................................................................34V. The Mortgage Interest Deduction ................................................................................36VI. Increasing the Supply of Affordable Housing: The National Housing Trust Fundand HR 1213 ..............................................................................................................39VII. On Housing Justice .....................................................................................................42Appendix A: On the Exchange and Use Value of Housing ...............................................53Appendix B: Selected Neighborhood Data ........................................................................56
 
3
I. Introduction
 R.J. managed a construction supply company in Baltimore. After thirty years he had accumulated theaccouterments of the middle class: a house, a truck, and financial security
 — 
or so he thought.
 R.J.’s leg was injured and surgery was required. Following the procedure, he developed MRSA, a
 serious iatrogenic infection. He remained hospitalized for several months, and was then transferred to anursing home for extended rehabilitation. Unfortunately during this period of treatment and unemployment, his home and truck were repossessed and R.J descended into penury and homelessness.When the nursing home could no longer obtain payment for its services, R.J. was discharged to the streets. Wearing only a T-shirt and jeans in that winter weather, he was in a wheelchair with a friendly
note attached: “Please return our wheelchair.”
 For several nights, R.J. slept behind buildings near the nursing home. Fortunately, he met an outreachworker from Health Care for the Homeless and was admitted to their Convalescent Care Program, a short-term residential program with supportive services. R.J. was diagnosed with several forms of canceand the short-term program became a long-term and life-saving endeavor. A year later he was discharged to a senior public housing building where he had his own affordableapartment. He was elected to the Resident Advisory Board of the Housing Authority of Baltimore Cityand became an active member of the Faces of Homelessness Speakers Bureau. In this capacity, R.J. shares his story, educating the public concerning the realities of homelessness and housing in Baltimore. He always explains that without publicly financed homeless services and public housing, he may not have survived his ordeal.
Each night thousands of Baltimoreans sleep in doorways, abandoned houses and cars, under bridges, andin crowded emergency shelters. The numbers have increased every year since the late 1970s, when allgovernmental entities in the U.S.
 — 
local, State, and national
 — 
embarked on policies and practices thathave reduced the supply of affordable housing, concomitant with rising income inequality.Homelessness, however, is only the most dramatic (and sometimes visible) aspect of the intertwinedcrises of housing and poverty that characterize our present condition. Nationally, 8.48 million renter 
households have ―worst
-
case housing needs‖; these are low
-income families or individuals withouthousing subsidies who pay more than half of their income for rent or who live in severely inadequateconditions.
1
 
Baltimore‘s housing agency reports that
41,637 households (104,092 individuals) have worst-case housing needs.
2
This is related, of course, to the extraordinary level of poverty in Baltimore,where an astounding 25.1% of residents
3
have incomes below the Federal poverty guidelines ($11,490for a single person; $15,510 for two, $19,530 for three, and $23,550 for a household of four).
4
35.6% of 
Baltimore‘s children live in families with incomes below the Federal poverty gui
delines.
5
34.5% of allCity residents (214,235 in May 2013) participated in Federal food programs,
6
while 46,000 children in
1
 
HUD, “Worst Case Housing Needs 2011: Report to Congress”, February 22, 2013,
2
Baltimore
Housing, “Consolidated Plan: July 1, 2010
-
June 30, 2015”.
 
3
 
U.S. Census Bureau, “Selected Economic Facts”, 2011 American Community Survey,
4
 
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, “Annual Update of the HHS Poverty Guidelines”,
Federal Register 
Notice, January 24,2013, https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2013/01/24/2013-01422/annual-update-of-the-hhs-poverty-guidelines.
5
The Annie E. Casey Foundation, 2013 Kids Count Data Book, http://tinyurl.com/m249pjn
6
 
Maryland Hunger Solutions, “
The
Federal Nutrition Programs in Baltimore City”,
http://www.mdhungersolutions.org/pdf/countydata/baltimore_city_may13.pd

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