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09-17-13

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 Volume 126 Issue 15
kansan.com
Tuesday, September 17, 2013
UDK
the student voice since 1904
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
MGMT ALBUM REVIEW
PAGE 5
All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2013 The University Daily Kansan
CLASSIFIEDS 9CROSSWORD 5CRYPTOQUIPS 5OPINION 4SPORTS 8SUDOKU 5
Scattered t-storms. 40percent chance of rain.Wind SSE at 10 mph.
Today is Constitution Day.Review the Preamble.
IndexDon’tforgetToday’s Weather
Eh.
HI: 83LO: 68
College students are being advisedto take more preventative measureswhen it comes to protecting theirpersonal inormation.According to a recent press releaserom the Better Business Bureau,young adults are the most at-risk group or identity the becauseo their high use o smartphonesand social media. Tey also oundthat “riendly raud” situations, inwhich riends access smartphonesor social media accounts withoutpermission, account or more than20 percent o on-campus identity the.University Inormation Security Ocer Rob Arnold said smart-phones make students vulnerableto identity thebecause they canbe easily lost orstolen. Accord-ing to ConsumerReports, 1.6 mil-lion phones werestolen in the U.S.last year alone.Arnold saidthere are simplesteps that can betaken to ensure saety i your phoneis lost or stolen, such as encryptingit with a pin number. Tis is some-thing nearly hal o smartphoneusers don’t do, according to a study rom Condent echnologies.“One o the best reasons to use en-cryption is that it keeps you com-ortable,” Arnold said. “You haveassurance that your data hasn’tbeen disclosed. It’s the dierencebetween losing a locked box or anunlocked box, and i you know thephone is encrypted you can takemore time beore you take moredrastic measures too.”In addition to encryption, Ar-nold said students can take otherprecautions to secure their inor-mation. Among those are not re-using passwords across multipleaccounts, having a backup plan i you lose your smartphone and tak-ing advantage o security servicesavailable on websites like Gmailand Facebook.Te Better Business Bureau alsorecommends that students keepimportant documents locked away and have important mail sent toa post oce box or their amily’shome.Although it may seem time con-suming, Arnold said taking stepslike these will prove benecial i a victim o identity the.“It is just a tiny productivity tax you pay when you have to dosomething like type in a pin,” hesaid. “None o them cost anything,but the time you spend doing thesewill denitely pay or itsel overand over again in the scenariowhere you would have had yourdata compromised, your deviceattacked or one o your accountsused by somebody or maliciouspurposes.”In cases o “riendly raud,” Ar-nold said the best preventativemeasure to take is simply keepingyour social media passwords toyoursel and careully consideringwhat you shareon the internet.Bailey Dumire,a reshman romSeattle, said herparents’ identity was stolen veyears ago, whichhas made hermore cautiouswhen it comesto her personalinormation onsocial media.“I’m really careul about what Iput on the Internet now,” Dumiresaid. “I’m not really into sharingstu on Facebook, so I don’t havemy age or where I live, and I don’tput any o the ne details.”Kristen Korona, a senior romKansas City, works at the KansasUnion Bookstore, which she saidhas also made her more aware o how easily someone can have theiridentity stolen.“Working at retail I’ve had a ew instances where people’s cardsdon’t match their IDs, so I’m awarethat kind o stu happens more o-ten than you would think,” Koronasaid. “I’m more careul about i Ilog in at work to my bank or any-thing with cell phones or comput-ers, I’m just more cautious aboutlogging out now.”o learn more about how to pro-tect yoursel rom identity the, theUniversity’s I Communicationsdepartment will be hosting educa-tional activities throughout Octo-ber or Cyber Security AwarenessMonth.
—Edited by Heather Nelson 
CULTURE
ABOVE AND BEYOND
CODY KUIPER
ckuiper@kansan.com 
Students have the opportunity to practice French outside of the classroom
“ I’m really careful aboutwhat I put on the Internetnow.”
BAILEY DUMIREfreshman
dentity theft poses threat to students 
SAFETY
In the upstairs area at Henry’sBar and Coee Shop, past clus-ters o small wooden tables andthe endlessly chattering Tursday night crowd, KU GA Gilles Vi-ennot engages students in casualconversation. Tey aren’t speak-ing English, however, as Viennotis using the weekly French ableas an inspiration or students tospeak the language outside o theclassroom.“It is a relaxed atmosphere tospeak French that is non-judg-mental,” Viennot said. “It’s opento everyone, o all ages, and is a very welcoming place.”Te French able currently meets at Henry’s, located at 11E. 8th St., on Tursdays at 8:30p.m. According to senior Ra-chel Forrest, who just returnedrom studying abroad in Aix-en-Provence, some may be anxiousabout joining a French conversa-tion that is not school-related.Forrest said this shouldn’t be aconcern, as all levels o Frenchare welcome.“I would encourage studentsto come by telling them to notworry, and even just take the rsttime to listen in,” Forrest said.“It’s so un and relaxed, and agreat way to make new riendsthat have something in commonwith you.”Te French able also serves asan outlet or those returning roma French-speaking country to stay procient in the language. Otherthan just speaking French, many students discuss “do’s and don’ts,share experiences and voice whatthey wish they would’ve knownabout studying abroad.“When I decided I wanted tostudy abroad, I wanted to per-ect my conversational skills toachieve fuency so it wouldn’t beawkward when I was trying toexpress mysel in France,” recentgraduate Milica Rastovic said.Viennot also said he sees a de-nite correlation between studentscoming to the French able, andthen aspiring to study abroad lat-er.Senior Je Shelton, a rst-timerin the group this semester, saidthe French able is very inclusive.“I didn’t know anyone when Idecided to come, and it seemsrelaxed,” Shelton said. “I’m anAnthropology major, so I’veonly taken a ew French classes. Iheard about this and just wanteda place to improve my French.”Senior Jabon Shackelord saidthe atmosphere at Henry’s, withits burgundy walls and small,connected rooms, reminds one o a scene in Paris.“Te ambience is what makesFrench able so great,” Shackel-ord said. “Along with the people,the environment serves as a cata-lyst or conversation.When thinking back on hisrst experiences with the Frenchable, Shackelord said it was apositive part o his college careerrom the beginning.“I actually heard about thisgroup rom my French proes-sor senior year o high school,”Shackelord said. “Te rst timeI came I was a reshman. It wasan August evening at 7 p.m., I wassitting in a corner, and I remem-ber the sun beaming in. I was su-per nervous, but I ended up mak-ing some o my best riends here.
—Edited by Duncan McHenry 
MADDIE FARBER
mfarber@kansan.com 
BROOK BARNES/KANSAN
Students engage in a discussion at the French Table. Speakers of all levels are invited to join the group every Thursday evening at Henry’s Bar and Coffee Shop.
As a part o KU Inormationechnology’s “Print romAnywhere” service, students willnow be able to print rom any iOS device, rom anywhere. Tisnew service will go along withthe current ability to print rompersonal computers and campuscomputer labs.Tis service is designed so thatstudents on-the-go can maintaintheir busy schedules withouthaving to sacrice precious timewaiting in lines at the printer.According to technology.ku.edu,the Print rom Anywhere initiativewill allow or remote printing to 12dierent locations across campus,including Watson and AnschutzLibraries.Library ocials are excitedto see the iOS unction addedto the already successulremote printingservices.“Over thecourse o theyear we haveover 1.6 millionpeople walk through our, doors and thisinitiative allows students accessto point-o-need services,” saidRebecca Smith, executive directoro communications or KULibraries. Smith hopes that thisaddition will help to cut down onprint queues in the libraries.o take advantage o this service,students can simply go to theprint option, select which buildingthey would like to pick up theirdocuments in, and upload theirles. Aer having completed thisprocess the les will remain in thequeue at the selected location ortwo hours.Upon arriving at the selectedlocation, all students need to dois log in to the printer using theirUniversity ID inormation.Like campus ocials, studentsare also excited to make use o this program.“Being able to print romanywhere would be very convenient, especially i you’rein a hurry,”said AllisonMcLeay, areshman romOmaha, Neb.Ryan Johnson,a junior romSalina, alsothinks “thiswill speed upthe printing process and cut downon waiting times.”However, not everyone isconvinced that this new servicewill make alarge-scaledierence.“It seems likea really coolidea, but I don’tknow i it willmake much o a dierence,”said Brittany Platt, a sophomorerom Chicago. “Because not a loto students will take advantage o it.” Students can visit technology.ku.edu or a detailed list o locations and instructions orprinting. KU I also encouragesstudents to make use o itshelplines and provide eedback as they attempt to work the bugsout with this new addition to theirservices.
—Edited by Ashleigh Tidwell 
CALEB SISK 
csisk@kansan.com 
Print from Anywhere brings printing to iOS devices
TECHNOLOGY
McLeay  Johnson Platt 
— information from the U.S. Department of Justice, Javelin Strategy and Research 
Average number of
U.S. IDENTITY FRAUD VICTIMS
annually
11,571,900
 
Average
FINANCIAL LOSS PER IDENTITY THEFT INCIDENT
$4,93064.1%
of identity thefts were
REPORTED AS MISUSE OF EXISTING CREDIT CARD
 
35%
were
REPORTED AS MISUSE OF OTHER EXISTINGBANK ACCOUNTS
 
14.2%
were
REPORTED AS MISUSE OF PERSONAL INFORMATION
O
 
Check out opinion 
PAGE 4
MISSING SOMETHING?
 
NEWS MANAGEMENTEditor-in-chief
Trevor Gra
Managing editors
Allison KohnDylan Lysen
Art Director
Katie Kutsko
ADVERTISING MANAGEMENTBusiness manager
Mollie Pointer
Sales manager
Sean Powers
NEWS SECTION EDITORSNews editor
Tara Bryant
Associate news editor
Emily Donovan
Sports editor
Mike Vernon
Associate sports editor
Blake Schuster
Entertainment editor
Hannah Barling
Copy chiefs
Lauren ArmendarizHayley JozwiakElise ReuterMadison Schultz
Design chief
Trey Conrad
Designers
Cole AnnebergAllyson Maturey
Opinion editor
Will Webber
Photo editor
George Mullinix
Special sections editor
Emma LeGault
Web editor
Wil Kenney
ADVISERSMedia director andcontent stategist
Brett Akagi
Sales and marketing adviser
 Jon Schlitt
N
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
news
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2013PAGE 2CONTACT US
editor@kansan.comwww.kansan.comNewsroom: (785)-766-1491Advertising: (785) 864-4358Twitter: @KansannewsFacebook: acebook.com/thekansan
The University Daily Kansan is the studentnewspaper o the University o Kansas. Thefrst copy is paid through the student activityee. Additional copies o The Kansan are50 cents. Subscriptions can be purchasedat the Kansan business ofce, 2051A DoleHuman Development Center, 1000 SunnysideAvenue, Lawrence, KS., 66045.The University Daily Kansan (ISSN 0746-4967) is published daily during the schoolyear except Friday, Saturday, Sunday, allbreak, spring break and exams and weeklyduring the summer session excludingholidays. Annual subscriptions by mail are$250 plus tax. Send address changes toThe University Daily Kansan, 2051A DoleHuman Development Center, 1000 SunnysideAvenue.
KANSAN MEDIA PARTNERS
Check outKUJH-TVon Knologyo KansasChannel 31 in Lawrence or more on whatyou’ve read in today’s Kansan and othernews. Also see KUJH’s website at tv.ku.edu.KJHK is the student voicein radio. Whether it’s rock‘n’ roll or reggae, sports orspecial events, KJHK 90.7is or you.
2000 Dole Human Development Center1000 Sunnyside AvenueLawrence, Kan., 66045
weather,
 Jay?
 What’s the
WednesdayThursdayFridayHI: 93HI: 89HI: 79LO: 70LO: 59LO: 50
— weather.com 
 
Isolated t-storms.30 percent chanceo rain. Wind S at20 mph.Scatteredt-storms. 40percent chance orain. Wind SSW at14 mph.Sunny. Zeropercent chance orain. Wind N at 8mph.
At least we have rain, right?This is just a tease.Feels like fall.
Calendar
Tuesday, Sept. 17Wednesday, Sept. 18Thursday, Sept. 19Friday, Sept. 20
Alpha Gamma Delta
percentage night at Fuzzy’s
10
am-
10
pm, Tuesday, 9/1710% of all proceeds (excluding alcohol) goes toward theAlpha Gamma Delta Foundation
Stop by 1100 Indiana Street on Saturday 9/21 from 10am-12pm for a Tailgate with Alpha Gamma Delta!$3 in advance, $5 the day ofProceeds will benefit the Aplha Gamma Delta Foundation
WANTNEWSUPDATESALL DAYLONG?
Follow 
@KansanNews 
on Twitter 
What:
Blurred Lines
When:
7 to 8 p.m.
Where:
Sabatini MulticulturalCenter, SMBC Classroom
About:
Video and discussion onmasculinity
What:
Japan Foundation FilmFestival “Army” Screening
When:
7 to 8:30 p.m.
Where:
Kansas Union, WoodruAuditorium
About:
Screening o the 1944 Japanese anti-war flm
What:
LibArt Exhibit Opening andAwards
When:
3 to 4 p.m.
Where:
Watson Library, Third FloorWest
About:
Reception celebrating thethird year o student artwork shownin University libraries
What:
Sexual Assault Candlelit Vigil
When:
8 p.m.
Where:
Campanile
About:
Vigil where the campanilewill toll or every survivor helped byGaDuGi this year
What:
Business Career Fair
When:
10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Where:
Kansas Union, 5th Floor
About:
Career air sponsored by theSchool o Business
What:
Kristin’s Story
When:
7 p.m.
Where:
Kansas Union, WoodruAuditorium
About:
Lecture by Andrea Cooper onher daughter’s experience with sexualassault and suicide
What:
Ambassador John Limbertdiscusses US-Iran relations
When
: 3:30 to 4:30 p.m.
Where:
Kansas Union, Kansas Room
About:
Free discussion by AmbassadorLimbert, a veteran U.S. diplomat andormer ofcial at the U.S. Embassyin Tehran, where he was held captiveduring the Iran hostage crisis in 1979.
What:
SUA campus movie series:“Monsters University”
When
: 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
Where:
Kansas Union, WoodruAuditorium
About:
Rated G. Free with SUA studentsaver card, $2 with KU ID, $3 or thegeneral public. Tickets available nighto show in the Kansas Union HawkShop, located on level 4.
Former Gov. Sebeliusto attend campaign event
KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Former KansasGov. Kathleen Sebelius will be back inthe state this week to attend a politicalevent or House Minority Leader PaulDavis.The Kansas City Star reports Mondaythat Sebelius, the current Health andHuman Services secretary in PresidentBarack Obama's administration, willattend the reception or Davis onThursday in Mission Hills.Davis, a Lawrence Democrat, hasormed a campaign committee or abid to challenge Republican Gov. SamBrownback in 2014. Davis is expectedto ormally announce his campaign inthe coming weeks. No other Democrathas announced plans to challengeBrownback next year.Sebelius was elected twice as gov-ernor ater serving as state insurancecommissioner. She resigned in 2009 tojoin the Obama administration.
— Associated Press 
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Health and Human Services secretary Kathleen Sebelius sits next to Jack-sonville Mayor Alvin Brown as she addressed local health care providers andcommunity leaders on details o the soon-to-be-implemented AordableCare Act during a visit to Jacksonville, Florida’s Sulzbacher Center Mondayaternoon, Sept. 16, 2013.
GOVERNMENTPOLICYCRIME
WICHIA, Kan. — Terewere ewer meth lab incidentsin Kansas last year compared to2011, but demand or the drugremains high, according to theKansas Bureau o Investigation.Te KBI reported 143 methlab incidents statewide in 2012,down rom 214 a year earlier, TeWichita Eagle reported (http://bit.ly/1bmMBtx ). Such incidentsare listed under three categories:seizures o meth chemicals,equipment and labs."Te numbers have decreasedin terms o manuacturing,but we're still seeing arrests orpossession and distribution o methamphetamine in all parts o the state," said Kelly Ralston, KBIspecial agent in charge.Te drop in Kansas ollowsan apparent nationwidetrend. Te Drug EnorcementAdministration said there wereabout 12,700 meth lab incidentsnationwide in 2012, down 5.5percent rom the 13,390 suchincidents in 2011.O Kansas' 143 meth labincidents reported last year,about hal were in ve countiesin southeast Kansas. CrawordCounty reported 25 meth labincidents, which is the highestnumber in Kansas, accordingto the KBI. O the other our,Montgomery County reported17 meth lab incidents, whileCherokee County had 11. Labetteand Neosho counties each hadnine.In 2011, Craword County also had the highest number o meth lab incidents reported inthe state, with 45. Montgomery County was second with 36,ollowed by Labette County with35 and Cherokee County with 27.Craword County Sherif DanPeak attributed the numbers tothe region's poverty, limited drugtreatment resources and location."I think a lot o it has to do withour proximity to Missouri andOklahoma," he said.
Kansas meth labincidents decrease
ASSOCIATED PRESS
RECYCLE RECYCLERECYCLE RECYCLERECYCLE RECYCLE
Kansas activist seekinggrand jury over statue
TOPEKA, Kan. — A Kansas am-ily policy activist is trying again topetition or a grand jury in JohnsonCounty to determine i a sculptureo a partially clad woman shouldbe removed rom an arboretum.Phillip Cosby, director o theAmerican Family Association oKansas and Missouri, is holding arally on Thursday to gather supportor the petition drive. The goal isto orce a grand jury to decide ithe “Accept or Reject” statue atthe Overland Park Arboretum andBotanical Gardens violates Kansasanti-obscenity laws.Cosby needs 4,700 signatures toseat a grand jury. The frst grandjury empaneled in the controversyin October 2012 did not issue anindictment remove the artwork,ruling the statue o a headlesswoman taking a photo o herselwas not obscene.
— Associated Press 
 
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2013THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSANPAGE 3
POLICE REPORTS
Happy birthday, Kansan! The rstocial issue o the paper, thentitled “Semi-Weekly Kansan,”appeared on campus 109 years agotoday. It became the Daily Kansanjust over seven years later.A 31-year-old male wasarrested yesterday on the900 block o Iowa Street onsuspicion o intimidating awitness or victim, domesticbattery and aggravatedbattery. No bond was posted.A 33-year-old male wasarrested Sunday on the900 block o 23rd Street onsuspicion o possession odrug paraphernalia andobstructing the legal process.A $3,000 bond was paid.A 24-year-old emale wasarrested Sunday on the1700 block o 6th Street onsuspicion o interering with anocer’s duties. A $100 bondwas paid.A 22-year-old male wasarrested Sunday on the1400 block o 9th Street onsuspicion o operating avehicle under the infuence. A$500 bond was paid.
—Emily Donovan 
Inormation based on theDouglas County Sheri’sOfce booking recap.





Student Body President Marcusetwiler took a step toward one o his campaign promises last week when he announced a plan to real-locate the “President’s EndowmentFund” to a scholarship programor KU students.etwiler ran under the Ad Astracoalition, which promised, amongother things, to make the StudentSenate more accessible and trans-parent.Te “President’s EndowmentFund” is an account that can bespent on unds or presidentialprojects without the approval o the Senate.“I do not think that a studentbody president should be ableto administer unds without any legislative oversight,” etwiler said.“Because that’s non-transparentand not what the student body  voted me in to do.According to a Student Senatepress release, the account currently holds $126,420.etwiler said he would like to seethat money go back to the studentsand plans to sign an agreement inthe coming weeks to establish thenew use o the und.“It’s students the whole way around — students working orstudents on behal o students,”etwiler said. “And that’s a modelthat student senate has champi-oned or years.”Tough the scholarship param-eters havenot yet beendetermined,etwiler saidthe money will go to anestablishedscholarshiporganizationto providemoney and re-sources ratherthan build anentirely new program overseen by the studentbody president.“Te idea that the president isinvolved in where that money goeswon’t happen anymore,” etwilersaid.In additionto reallocatingthat money to ascholarship pro-gram, etwilersaid he hopes topartner with theSchool o Busi-ness in order togrow the accountmore rapidly than it has grownwith KU Endow-ment.Te partnership would allow business students to gain re-al-world experience by managingthe account.Michael Graham, student senatetreasurer, supports the change andsaid he thinks it will be good orbusiness school students to haveexperience with the und.“I think it’s a good use o the undthat will produce a long lastingimpact,” Graham said.Negotiations with the School o Business are ongoing, but etwilersaid he thinks his plan couldeasibly be put into eect by all o next year.“Hopeully everyone sees themerit in the idea o growing ourmoney aster,” etwiler said.
— Edited by Ashleigh Tidwell 
KAITLYN KLEIN
kklein@kansan.com 
Student body president creates scholarship 
SENATE
HOUSON — Kathy Platonistood in a doctor's oce trying tohide her shaking rom the otherpatients in the waiting room asshe watched the news unoldabout a shooting at the Washing-ton Navy Yard.Memories rom a similar day nearly ve years ago came ood-ing back, a day in 2009 when anArmy psychiatrist opened re atFort Hood in exas, killing 13people, several o them Platoni'sriends."It's surreal. I'm stunned to thebone. I mean here we are again,"Platoni said in a phone interview Monday.Platoni, an Army reservist,still struggles with images o her riend, Capt. John Gaaney,bleeding to death at her kneesat Fort Hood. On Monday, shewatched the reports o an attack at another military installation.Tis time, authorities say aormer Navy man opened re onoce workers at the WashingtonNavy Yard. Tirteen people werekilled, including the gunman."I was trying not to let the otherpatients in the waiting room seeme shake, but I was shaken to thecore," said Platoni.Platoni just last month hadrelived the Fort Hood shooting,as she sat through a weekslongmilitary trial or Nidal Hassan.He was convicted and sentencedto death or the attack."Te act that this was on amilitary installation, it just hitsway too close to home," Platonisaid. "o know what these poorindividuals and amilies are goingto go through, that's the worst o it ... and I wish I could be thereto help."Keely Cahill, whose ather,Michael Cahill, was shot andkilled afer he lifed a chair to try to stop the Fort Hood rampage,nearly broke down as she talkedabout Monday's attack."Tis is exactly the same thing,"Cahill said, her voice crackingwith emotion. "I know exactly what those amilies are eeling.”
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Navy Yard shooting shakesvictims of Fort Hood attack
NATIONENVIRONMENT
ASSOCIATED PRESS
This booking photo provided by theFort Worth Police Department showsAaron Alexis, arrested in September,2010, on suspicion o discharging arearm in the city limits. The FBI hasidentied Alexis, 34, as the gunmanin on Monday, shooting rampage atthe Washington Navy Yard that letthirteen dead, including himsel.
Colorado evacuees returnto fnd more heartbreak
HYGIENE, Colo. — Weary Coloradoevacuees have begun returning homeater days o rain and fooding, butMonday's clearing skies and recedingwaters revealed only more heartbreak:toppled houses, upended vehiclesand a stinking layer o muck coveringeverything.Rescuers grounded by weekend rainstook advantage o the break in theweather to resume searches or peoplestill stranded, with 21 helicoptersanning out over the mountainsidesand the plains to drop supplies andairlit those who need help.The conrmed death toll stood atour, with two women missing andpresumed dead.The number o missing people wasdicult to pinpoint, but it has beendecreasing. The state's count ellMonday rom just over 1,200 to abouthal that. State ocials hoped theoverall number would continue to dropwith rescuers reaching more peopleand phone service being restored."You've got to remember, a lot othese olks lost cellphones, landlines,the Internet our to ve days ago,"Gov. John Hickenlooper said on NBC's"Today" show. "I am very hopeul thatthe vast majority o these people aresae and sound."Residents o Hygiene returned totheir small community east o theoothills to nd mud blanketing roads,garages, even the tops o ence posts.The raging St. Vrain River they fedthree days earlier had let trucks inditches and carried items as ar as 2miles downstream."My own slice o heaven, and it'sgone," Bill Marquedt said ater ndinghis home destroyed.Residents immediately set to sweep-ing, shoveling and rinsing, but thetask o rebuilding seemed overwhelm-ing to some."What now? We don't even knowwhere to start," said Genevieve Mar-quez. "It's not even like a day by day ora month thing."I want to think that ar ahead butit's a minute by minute thing at thispoint. And, I guess now it's just helpeveryone out and try to get our livesback," she added.In the mountain towns, major roadswere washed away or covered by mudand rock slides.Hamlets like Glen Haven werereduced to debris and key inrastruc-ture like gas lines and sewers systemswere destroyed.Hundreds o homes around EstesPark, next to Rocky Mountain NationalPark, could be unreachable anduninhabitable or up to a year, townadministrator Frank Lancaster said.
—Associated Press 
I do not think that a studentbody president should beable to administer undswithout any legislativeoversight
.”
MARCUS TETWILERstudent body president

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