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The Messengers by Edward Hogan - Sample Chapter

The Messengers by Edward Hogan - Sample Chapter

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Published by Walker Books
"Perhaps we’re here to save a few people. Maybe that’s the gift."

When fifteen-year-old Frances is sent down to the coast to Helmstown, to live with her aunt, uncle and cousin, she meets and befriends Peter Kennedy, a somewhat tramp-like character who lives in a beach hut along the seafront. As soon as they meet, Peter recognizes that Frances is a messenger, just like him. As messengers, they experience black-outs, and when they come round, they have the ability to draw, in minute detail, the scene of an accident. Although Frances can’t change the past, she realises that she can change the future, at least for a chosen few.

Another compelling and thrilling novel for teenagers by the author of the highly acclaimed Daylight Saving.
"Perhaps we’re here to save a few people. Maybe that’s the gift."

When fifteen-year-old Frances is sent down to the coast to Helmstown, to live with her aunt, uncle and cousin, she meets and befriends Peter Kennedy, a somewhat tramp-like character who lives in a beach hut along the seafront. As soon as they meet, Peter recognizes that Frances is a messenger, just like him. As messengers, they experience black-outs, and when they come round, they have the ability to draw, in minute detail, the scene of an accident. Although Frances can’t change the past, she realises that she can change the future, at least for a chosen few.

Another compelling and thrilling novel for teenagers by the author of the highly acclaimed Daylight Saving.

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Categories:Book Excerpts
Published by: Walker Books on Sep 19, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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11/14/2013

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7
ONE
We’re drawn to each other, us messengers. We must be.I remember the first time I saw him, down by the beach huts.There was something about him. The
look 
of him. How couldI not go over?You might even say it was fate, but I don’t believe in that.I’d been sent to Helmstown for a little break. Back home,there’d been all sorts of trouble. My brother, Johnny, hadpunched an off-duty policeman during a pub brawl, andthe guy was in intensive care. A few days later, some shadycharacters had thrown a brick through the window of our flat.Johnny, scared about what the police might do to him, was onthe run. Mum had gone to stay with her boyfriend (who I don’t like), so she’d given me some cash and sent me down to thecoast to stay with my aunt and uncle, and my cousin, Max. It was the summer holidays.My name is Frances, but they called me “
Fraaaancers
in Helmstown, because of the accent. It was like a different 
 
8
name, and Helmstown was like a different world.So there we were, me and Max, walking the path above thesea wall as the night came down. The day had been muggy, but the wind was fresh now, and when it came off the sea, you felt like you’d been slapped. The beach huts were on our left, andalmost all of them were dark and padlocked. They looked likecold little men in hats.“Where are these mates of yours then, Maxi?”“By the Coffee Shack probably,” he said.The Coffee Shack! Back home, we didn’t meet our friendsfor
coffee
after dark.Max was a year younger than me, and the last time I’d seenhim he was a chubby little boy in shorts who collected beetlesand watched cartoons. He’d had a growth spurt since then.Now he swished his hair to one side, and wore geek-chic thick-rimmed glasses with thin lenses and low-rise skinny jeanswith the bum hanging down. He carried a skateboard. It wasnice: I’d turned up expecting a little squirt to hang out with,and I’d found a proper friend. Maybe.Further up the path, I could see that one of the beach hutswas lit from the inside. Lamplight spilled out beyond the openred door.“So, what did the doctor say about your fainting? You’rehardly a delicate flower, Frances,” Max said.“He said it was your mum’s cooking,” I said.It wasn’t. Auntie Lizzie’s a great cook. The truth was, I’dbeen having these funny turns for a while. The Helmstowndoctor was as clueless as the doctors back home. It was

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