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China Central-Local Fiscal Relations

China Central-Local Fiscal Relations

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The Chinese government has officially enshrined the policy goal of striving for a “harmonious society.” Reform of public finance helps meet the challenge of reducing regional and urban-rural disparities and improving public health, education and social security; it stands as a cornerstone of that policy goal. China’s fiscal system has undergone major transformations as its economy evolves from a centrally planned to a market-based one. In 1994, for example, the central government changed the way it shares tax revenues with the provinces, a key reference point for the changing dynamics of intergovernmental fiscal relations in China. The 1994 tax reform accomplished many important policy goals and left the center with greater control of tax revenues. However, sub-provincial governments continue to shoulder the main burden of providing health care, schooling and other services. All too often cash-strapped local governments resort to illegal land grabs and illegal levies. This has directly contributed to increasing social tension.

To explore the changing central-local dynamics through the lens of fiscal reform, the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations and Renmin University of China co-organized a conference on China’s intergovernmental fiscal relations in Beijing last summer. Generous funding was provided by the Ford Foundation. Over 40 scholars and practitioners shared comparative perspectives on the fiscal relations between central and sub-national governments, including responsibility for policy mandates, resource allocations,
ii budgeting process and reform of government structures and practices. The participants included six experts from the United States, the United Kingdom and France; the Ministry of Finance and provincial budget officials; and prominent scholars from academic and research institutions in the field of public finance and taxation. The high quality of presentations and the lively exchange of ideas made for an excellent conference.

The report that follows was written by Professor Susan Whiting of the University of Washington. Professor Whiting is a participant in the National Committee’s Public Intellectuals Program, a multi-year program designed to nurture the next generation of China scholars in the United States. She attended the conference as the rapporteur, and the views reflected, except where otherwise noted, are her own and not those of any other participants.
The Chinese government has officially enshrined the policy goal of striving for a “harmonious society.” Reform of public finance helps meet the challenge of reducing regional and urban-rural disparities and improving public health, education and social security; it stands as a cornerstone of that policy goal. China’s fiscal system has undergone major transformations as its economy evolves from a centrally planned to a market-based one. In 1994, for example, the central government changed the way it shares tax revenues with the provinces, a key reference point for the changing dynamics of intergovernmental fiscal relations in China. The 1994 tax reform accomplished many important policy goals and left the center with greater control of tax revenues. However, sub-provincial governments continue to shoulder the main burden of providing health care, schooling and other services. All too often cash-strapped local governments resort to illegal land grabs and illegal levies. This has directly contributed to increasing social tension.

To explore the changing central-local dynamics through the lens of fiscal reform, the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations and Renmin University of China co-organized a conference on China’s intergovernmental fiscal relations in Beijing last summer. Generous funding was provided by the Ford Foundation. Over 40 scholars and practitioners shared comparative perspectives on the fiscal relations between central and sub-national governments, including responsibility for policy mandates, resource allocations,
ii budgeting process and reform of government structures and practices. The participants included six experts from the United States, the United Kingdom and France; the Ministry of Finance and provincial budget officials; and prominent scholars from academic and research institutions in the field of public finance and taxation. The high quality of presentations and the lively exchange of ideas made for an excellent conference.

The report that follows was written by Professor Susan Whiting of the University of Washington. Professor Whiting is a participant in the National Committee’s Public Intellectuals Program, a multi-year program designed to nurture the next generation of China scholars in the United States. She attended the conference as the rapporteur, and the views reflected, except where otherwise noted, are her own and not those of any other participants.

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05/11/2014

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CENTRAL-LOCAL FISCAL RELATIONS IN CHINA
\u4e2d\u56fd\u7684\u4e2d\u592e\u5730\u65b9\u8d22\u653f\u5173\u7cfb
By Susan H. Whiting
\u767d\u7d20\u73ca
China Policy Series
Number XXII
April 2007
CENTRAL-LOCALFISCALRELATIONS INCHINA
A Report Based on the Proceedings of the International Conference on
Intergovernmental Fiscal Relations in China
Susan H. Whiting
\u4e2d\u56fd\u7684\u4e2d\u592e\u5730\u65b9\u8d22\u653f\u5173\u7cfb
\u2014\u2014\u4e2d\u56fd\u653f\u5e9c\u95f4\u8d22\u653f\u5173\u7cfb\u56fd\u9645\u7814\u8ba8\u4f1a\u62a5\u544a
\u767d\u7d20\u73ca
TABLE OF CONTENTS\u25cf\u76ee\u5f55
Preface
i
\u5e8f
iii
Introduction
1
Background
2
Conference Overview

5
The Mismatch Between Revenue Assignments
and Expenditure Responsibilities

6
Revenue Inadequacy
8
Going Off-Budget and Taking on Debt
10
Intergovernmental Fiscal Transfers and Implications
for Regional Inequality
12
Political Factors Exacerbating Problems in
Central-Local Fiscal Relations
16
Recommendations
18
Improving revenue and expenditure assignments
18
Local autonomy and accountability
18
Unifying the budget
19
Formalizing and regulating local government debt
19
Streamlining government
20
Improving intergovernmental fiscal transfers
20

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