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Using intuitive intelligence during your research

Using intuitive intelligence during your research

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Published by MarcusTanthony
This article details ways that researchers can make their research more purposeful, exciting and effective by utlising the intuitive mind. I outline five specific and easy-to-use tools that researchers can begin with. The article is semi-autobiographical, and outlines how I used these tools to help write a doctoral thesis. Though the article is aimed at researchers in the discipline of Foresight/Futures Studies, the tools can be used by researchers of all disciplines.
The ideas in this article are explained in much greater detail in my upcoming book, "The Professor's Other Brain", available in December 2009. For my latest book, "Sage of Synchroncity", see www.eastwestfutures.com, and Amazon.com, available 15/10/09.
This article details ways that researchers can make their research more purposeful, exciting and effective by utlising the intuitive mind. I outline five specific and easy-to-use tools that researchers can begin with. The article is semi-autobiographical, and outlines how I used these tools to help write a doctoral thesis. Though the article is aimed at researchers in the discipline of Foresight/Futures Studies, the tools can be used by researchers of all disciplines.
The ideas in this article are explained in much greater detail in my upcoming book, "The Professor's Other Brain", available in December 2009. For my latest book, "Sage of Synchroncity", see www.eastwestfutures.com, and Amazon.com, available 15/10/09.

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Published by: MarcusTanthony on Jul 01, 2009
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05/11/2014

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2009 Volume:11Issue:1Page: 61 - 80
Abstract.
 
The main purpose of this paper is to introduce Futures researchers tosimple and practical ways they can employ intuitive intelligence to enhance their research. I will outline five specific intuitive tools which I have developed and used regularly. The incorporation of these tools into the research process potentially makes research more efficient, meaningful and exciting. This paper contains astrong anecdotal component, to exemplify the processes.There is also a theoretical aspect. I expand the mundane definition of intuition, and use it in the classical sense, where it incorporates the idea of the extended mind. Irefer to this as “integrated intelligence”. While this definition places it beyond generally accepted definitions of intuition found in modern psychology, it has a longtradition in the history of art, literature and science right through to the modernera. It is also consistent with recent experimental scientific evidence. Further, it fitswell into recent developments in Critical and Post-conventional Futures Studies,where “other ways of knowing” are being increasingly legitimatised.
Marcus Anthony
Don’t get so far ahead of the parade that nobody can see where you are.
 John Naisbitt (2007),
Mind Set 
Only intuition, resting on sympathetic understanding can lead to these laws. Thedaily effort comes from no deliberate intention or program, but straight from theheart.Albert Einstein (quoted in Hart 2000 p 20).
Introduction
One day several decades ago, a young man walked into a public library. He wantedto find answers to some deep questions he had been asking himself about thenature of mind, cosmos and their relationship to modern physics. In those daysthere were no computers, and he did not have much of a liking for the cardcatalogue, so he did what he often did when he wanted to home in on some hardinformation. He began walking along the many shelves of books. He did not botherto look at the call numbers librarians had spent thousands of hours inscribing on thebinding of the books. Instead, he just kept walking. Suddenly, he got the strongfeeling he had been waiting for, stopped, reached out and grabbed a book from theshelf. The book was exactly what he needed, addressing the effect of humanobservation on experiments in quantum physics. It was that moment whichlaunched Michael Talbot on a lifelong interest in the confluence between mysticismand what he called “the new physics” (Talbot 1992 p 137).What interests me about Talbot’s tale, is not so much his beliefs about links betweenmysticism and physics, but the “way of knowing” he used to locate his data. Whydid he not just use the card catalogue like everybody else? Was he just being lazy? The answer, according to Talbot, is that he often relied on his intuition, and a senseof feeling to find books in libraries. He
felt 
that this was often a more reliableprocess than using conventional methods. He believed that he would be led to findthe answer to the question she was posing.1
 
What would
 you
do? Chances are you would head for the card catalogue, or themodern equivalent, the computer database. And that tells us something about theway our minds have been trained to think, and the ways of knowing that we havecome to call “normal” in the modern world.Some will dismiss Talbot as a “New Ager”, “hippie”, or as simply deluded. Yet theseterms relegate Talbot to the realm of the other, and effectively prevent us fromasking “why” - and more importantly “how” - he used intuition to locate informationin public libraries. In this way we as researchers remain confined within our comfortzones, and the boundaries to our knowledge are unconsciously maintained.In this paper I am going to push the boundaries, and bring us to the frontiers of mind – at least as defined in the modern western world. Below, I will outline fiveintuitive research tools which can be used by futurists (and others who may wish touse them). In Part 1 I will provide a theoretical background for my argument, and inPart 2 I will outline the tools, their potential applications, and relate them tocognitive modalities within the theory of integrated intelligence (Anthony 2008a).Part 3 briefly addresses three issues you may face as you apply these kinds of toolsto your research. The approach I recommend may be an affront to seasoned researchers. However, inthe spirit of Postconventional Futures Studies, I will challenge the parameters of dominant discourse, and offer this paper as an act of “dissent” (Slaughter 2006) – adeep challenge to prevailing methods and paradigms.
Part 1: The theoretical perspective
Elsewhere I have argued for the legitimisation of intuitive ways of knowing inmodern education (Anthony 2005, 2008a, 2008b). I have developed a theory of intelligence called integrated intelligence.
i
Integrated intelligence is the ability tosuccessfully solve problems using a full repertoire of cognitive abilities, includingintuition in its classical sense. Such intuition incorporates transpersonal cognitivepotentials, and includes the capacity to work with the extended mind (Sheldrake2003), or consciousness that extends beyond the brain. So far, my work has beenprimarily theoretical and conceptual. What I did not outline so clearly is that there isa very practical side to integrated intelligence, and you do not need to be an Indianmystic or Uri Geller to use it.I have employed the tools extensively in my own research, including during thewriting of my doctoral thesis. In this paper I am going to relate some of myexperience in writing my doctoral thesis using these methods. This will includesome excerpts from my study diary, which I kept at the time. The “mystical” components of integrated intelligence may lie beyond the comfortzones of some researchers. I simply suggest a suspension of disbelief as you try themethods yourself. I can report that the benefits are many, including makingresearch more exciting, fluid, efficient, and of course, intuitive.Dean Radin (2008) states that only about 0.3% of university staff will publicallyadmit to an interest in psi research. This is due to what he calls the “psi taboo.”2
 
Integrated intelligence has obvious links with psi research, as the concept of extended mind is related to such psi phenomena as extra-sensory perception,clairvoyance, precognition, and so on. While there are transpersonal researcherswho do employ related tools formally in their research (Hart, Nelson & Puhakka2000), in the process I am suggesting here, the five tools are not formallyincorporated into research methodology, but are background tools which enhancethe research process. You do not have to have any specific belief in a classical interpretation of intuition touse these tools. It would help, however, to temporarily suspend doubt. After all, thesuspension of doubt is the stance of the true skeptic, not a dogmatic insistence on aparticular perspective, as Rupert Sheldrake has so often stated (Sheldrake 2003).I see integrated intelligence as a means of facilitating and enhancing other ways of knowing. It is not a means to do away with critical rationality or traditional researchmethods. May I suggest you begin with whichever of the tools you feel mostcomfortable. You can modify them according to your particular needs andpreferences. I developed these tools through experimentation, and throughadapting and modifying other people’s ideas.
I continue to work and experimentwith them. I invite you do the same.Here I will categorise the tools according the core operations of the theory of integrated intelligence, as outlined previously (Anthony 2006, 2008a, 2008b):integrated perception, location, diagnosis, evaluation, fore-sense, and creativity andinnovation.
The evolution of Futures Studies and intuitive ways of knowing
Where can we situate these ideas, considering they are rather radical? Australianfuturist Richard Slaughter sees Futures Studies as having evolved through fourdistinct phases. The first was the empirical tradition, which was most prominent inthe United States. The second was a “culturally based” approach - predominantlyEuropean - which eventually led to Critical Futures studies. Then in the third phasean international and multicultural thrust emerged, which Slaughter finds is stilldeveloping. Slaughter’s fourth phase has been the emergence of Post-conventionalFutures and Integral Futures studies.Integral Futures studies has developed from the work of Ken Wilber (2000) (amongstothers) and the integral tradition which he developed (Slaughter 2003). In simplifiedform, Wilber’s analytical approach looks at four distinct domains: the physical world,culture, society, and consciousness. In short, it examines both exteriors and humaninteriors. The essence of Wilber’s model is summarised by Slaughter in the following way. The central feature of the integral approach is to honor all truths andacknowledge the value of many different ways of knowing across allsignificant fields (Slaughter 2003).3

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