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The Peloponnesian War Part 1

The Peloponnesian War Part 1

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THEONLINE LIBRARY OF LIBERTY© Liberty Fund, Inc. 2005
 
http://oll.libertyfund.org/Home3/index.php
THOMAS HOBBES, (17THC)
THE ENGLISH WORKS, VOL. VIII (THE PELOPONNESIAN WAR PART I)
URL of this E-Book:URL of original HTML file:http://oll.libertyfund.org/EBooks/Hobbes_0051.08.pdf http://oll.libertyfund.org/Home3/HTML.php?recordID=0051.08
 
ABOUT THE AUTHOR 
Thomas Hobbes was an English philosopher who lived during theEnglish Revolution. He is most famous for his work of politicalphilosophy .
The Leviathan
 
ABOUT THE BOOK
Vol. 1 of Hobbes’ translation. Thucydides was one of the greatestof the ancient Greek historians because of his attention toaccurate research. His account of the 5th century BC strugglebetween Athens and Sparta is one of the first works of history tocombine political and ethical reflections with history writing. 
THE EDITION USED
The English Works of Thomas Hobbes of Malmesbury: Now First Collected and Edited by Sir William Molesworth, Bart., (London:Bohn, 1839-45).
COPYRIGHT INFORMATION
The text of this edition is in the public domain. 
FAIR USE STATEMENT
This material is put online to further the educational goals of Liberty Fund, Inc. Unless otherwise stated in the CopyrightInformation section above, this material may be used freely foreducational and academic purposes. It may not be used in anyway for profit. 
 _______________________________________________________ TABLE OF CONTENTS
ADVERTISEMENT.TO THE RIGHT HONOURABLE SIR WILLIAM CAVENDISH,
KNIGHT
 
OF
 
THE
 
BATH
,
BARON
 
OF
 
HARDWICK
,
AND
 
EARL
 
OF
 
DEVONSHIRE
.TO THE READERS.OF THE LIFE AND HISTORY THUCYDIDES.
OF
ENDNOTESTHE FIRST BOOK HISTORY OF THUCYDIDES.
OF
 
THE
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ENDNOTESTHE SECOND BOOK HISTORY OF THUCYDIDES.
OF
 
THE
ENDNOTESTHE THIRD BOOK HISTORY OF THUCYDIDES.
OF
 
THE
ENDNOTESTHE FOURTH BOOK HISTORY OF THUCYDIDES.
OF
 
THE
ENDNOTES 
 _______________________________________________________ 
 
THOMAS HOBBES, (17THC)
THE ENGLISH WORKS, VOL. VIII (THE PELOPONNESIAN WAR PART I)
 LONDON: RICHARDS, PRINTER, 100, ST. MARTIN’S LANE.
ADVERTISEMENT.
merit of Hobbes’ translation of Thucydides lies principally in the simplicity and force of the language: bearing in that respectsome affinity to the original. Viewed merely as a translation, it will be found to contain, owing partly to the corrupt state of theGreek text of his day, partly to his habitual disregard of minute details so that accuracy were attained in essentials, manifolderrors and omissions. As these defects disfigure the narrative, and sometimes perplex the reader, it has been considered worthwhile to attempt, by short notes, something towards their removal: without however affecting to offer a translation eithercritically correct or even free from many errors. In the performance of this task the interpretations of Goeller, Arnold, Thirlwalland others, have been followed wheresoever they were available: where such help failed, the editor had to rely on his ownimperfect resources.T
HE
To render the work more useful to the English reader and those not deeply versed in Grecian history, some historical notes havebeen added, drawn for the most part in substance from Mueller’s history of the Dorians, Hermann’s Grecian Antiquities,Thirlwall’s history of Greece, Niebuhr’s history of Rome, &c. Wheresoever Aristotle is cited, his Politics will be understood to bethe work referred to.Several phrases having been marked by Hobbes himself with square brackets, to designate them as interpolations, the samemarks have been added for the same purpose to other words and passages.Those corrections of the Greek text by Bekker and others only have been noticed, which serve to explain the cause of Hobbes’ departure in those instances from the right interpretation.It has been considered useless to reprint the maps belonging to the original edition, and referred to in the Epistle to the Reader.These were unavoidably rude and imperfect, and have been long superseded both by the more general maps to be found in anymodern Atlas, and the numerous maps and plans which have been published of late years for the particular illustration of thishistory. It has however been thought useful to append Goeller’s map of the siege of Syracuse, which is accessible only in hisedition of the text.E. G.
TO THE RIGHT HONOURABLE SIR WILLIAM CAVENDISH,
KNIGHT
 
OF
 
THE
 
BATH
,
BARON
 
OF
 
HARDWICK
,
AND
 
EARL
 
OF
 
DEVONSHIRE
.
I take confidence from your Lordship’s goodness in the very entrance of this Epistle, to profess, with simplicityand according to the faith I owe my master now in heaven, that it is not unto yourself, but to your Lordship’s father that IR
IGHT
H
ONOURABLE
,
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dedicate this my labour, such as it is. For neither am I at liberty to make choice of one to whom I may present it as a voluntaryoblation; being bound in duty to bring it in as an account to him, by whose indulgence I had both the time and ammunition toperform it. Nor if such obligation were removed, know I any to whom I ought to dedicate it rather. For by the experience of many years I had the honour to serve him, I know this: there was not any, who more really, and less for glory’s sake favouredthose that studied the liberal arts liberally, than my Lord your father did; nor in whose house a man should less need theuniversity than in his. For his own study, it was bestowed, for the most part, in that kind of learning which best deserveth thepains and hours of great persons, history and civil knowledge: and directed not to the ostentation of his reading, but to thegovernment of his life and the public good. For he read, so that the learning he took in by study, by judgment he digested, andconverted into wisdom and ability to benefit his country: to which also he applied himself with zeal, but such as took no fireeither from faction or ambition. And as he was a most able man, for soundness of advice and clear expression of himself, inmatters of difficulty and consequence, both in public and private: so also was he one whom no man was able either to draw or justle out of the straight path of justice. Of which virtue, I know not whether he deserved more by his severity in imposing it (ashe did to his last breath) on himself, or by his magnanimity in not exacting it to himself from others. No man better discerned of men: and therefore was he constant in his friendships,becauseheregardednotthe nor but the withwhom also he conversed with an openness of heart that had no other guard than his own integrity and thatTo hisequals he carried himself equally, and to his inferiors familiarly; but maintaining his respect fully, and only with the nativesplendour of his worth. In sum, he was one in whom might plainly be perceived, that and are but the same thingin the different degrees of persons. To him therefore, and to the memory of his worth, be consecrated this, though unworthy,offering.
fortuneadherence,men;
NIL
 
CONSCIRE
.
honourhonest
And now, imitating in this worship the worship of the gentiles; who, when they dedicated any thing to their gods,brought and presented the same to their images: I bring and present this gift of mine, translated intoEnglish with much more diligence than elegance, to your Lordship; who are the image of your father, (for never was a man moreexactly copied out than he in you), and who have in you the seeds of his virtues already springing up: humbly intreating yourLordship to esteem it amongst the goods that descend upon you, and in your due time to read it. I could recommend the authorunto you, not impertinently, for that he had in his veins the blood of kings; but I choose rather to recommend him for hiswritings, as having in them profitable instruction for noblemen, and such as may come to have the managing of great andweighty actions. For I may confidently say, that notwithstanding the excellent both examples and precepts of heroic virtue youhave at home, this book will confer not a little to your institution; especially when you come to the years to frame your life byyour own observation. For in history, actions of and do appear plainly and distinctly, which are which; but in thepresent age they are so disguised, that few there be, and those very careful, that be not grossly mistaken in them. But this, Idoubt not, is superfluously spoken by me to your Lordship. Therefore I end with this prayer: that it will please God to give youvirtues suitable to the fair dwelling he hath prepared for them, and the happiness that such virtues lead unto both in and afterthis world.
civilreligious
THE
 
HISTORY
 
OF
 
THUCYDIDES
,
honourdishonou
Your Lordship’s most humble servant,T
HO
: H
OBBES
.
TO THE READERS.
this translation have already past the censure of some, whose judgments I very much esteem: yet because there issomething, I know not what, in the censure of a multitude, more terrible than any single judgment, how severe or exact soever,I have thought it discretion in all men, that have to do with so many, and to me, in my want of perfection, necessary, tobespeak your candour. Which that I may upon the better reason hope for, I am willing to acquaint you briefly, upon what groundsI undertook this work at first; and have since, by publishing it, put myself upon the hazard of your censure, with so small hope of glory as from a thing of this nature can be expected. For I know, that mere translations have in them this property: that theymay much disgrace, if not well done; but if well, not much commend the doer.T
HOUGH
It hath been noted by divers, that Homer in poesy, Aristotle in philosophy, Demosthenes in eloquence, and others of the ancientsin other knowledge, do still maintain their primacy: none of them exceeded, some not approached, by any in these later ages.And in the number of these is justly ranked also our Thucydides; a workman no less perfect in his work, than any of the former;and in whom (I believe with many others) the faculty of writing history is at the highest. For the principal and proper work of history being to instruct and enable men, by the knowledge of actions past, to bear themselves prudently in the present andprovidently towards the future: there is not extant any other (merely human) that doth more naturally and fully perform it, than
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