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According to new ederal data,states and universities have beendecreasing aid they provideto lower-income students andincreasing the money going tomore auent ones.An analysis o ederal data by ProPublica ound that since 1996,the portion o grants given tothe poorest college students hasshrunk rom 34 percent to 25percent, and the portion going tothe wealthiest has increased rom16 percent to 23 percent.Director o the KU News ServiceJill Jess said this trend could bea result o universities trying tobring a certain diversity to theircampus.“Tere is a ocused eort withinhigher education to strategically use available unds to supportinstitutional goals, such as a high-ability and diverse student body,”she said.According to a study conductedby the think tank New AmericaFoundation in May entitled,“Undermining Pell: How CollegesCompete or Wealthy Studentsand Leave the Low-IncomeBehind,” the increase in money or higher-income studentscomes primarily rom an increasein merit-aid, which is money granted to students regardless o their nancial need. In 1995, stateuniversities provided merit-aid toeight percent o undergraduatesand need-based aid to 13percent, but now 18 percent o undergraduates are granted merit-aid and only 16 percent receiveneed-based aid.Te majority o University scholarships are merit-based andnot based on students’ amily income, but Jess said this doesnot necessarily mean students’nancial needs are not consideredwhen it comes to aid andscholarships.“Some scholarship donorsdo include a nancial-needcomponent, which does takeinto consideration the student’samily income and ability topay,” she said. “In other words,when awarding scholarships, theUniversity adheres to the donor’scriteria.”Jess added that the University oers the KU Pell Advantagegrant, which is determined bothby a amily’s ability to pay theirstudent’s expenses as well as thestudent’s high school GPA andtest scores.Te New America Foundationstudy also ound that lower-income students are acing highernet prices because o a strategy called “high tuition, high aid” inwhich universities greatly increasetuition and oer more nancialaid to low-income students at thesame time. However, the study ound that low-income studentsat universities that take thisapproach are acing net prices thatare twice as much as those at “low-tuition” universities.Senior Carson Levine pays or allher expenses hersel, but becauseshe is under the age o 25, she isstill considered a dependent anddoes not receive as much nancialaid. She did not receive her usualPell Grant or her nal semester.Because o this, Levine says shecan empathize with the difcultieslower-income students ace whentrying to pay or school.“It is rustrating,” she said.“Tere’s a lot o hoops to jumpthrough and a lot o stu youhave to do to get the aid. I mean,I applied or nancial aid my reshman year, but they thoughtmy dad made too much money,which I elt wasn’t true at all, butI didn’t get it.”Garrett Fugete, a graduatestudent rom St. Louis, saysuniversities need to nd a way to get more aid to lower incomestudents, but also avoid punishingthose who earned scholarships.“I don’t see anything wrong withbasing things on merit,” Fugetesaid. “I mean i you’re a goodstudent, I think people shouldbe able to be rewarded or that.Maybe they should nd a balance,where i there’s a person with goodgrades and in need, they shouldcome rst, rather than a personwho does have merit but doesn’treally have that need.” 
— Edited by Kayla Overbey 
 Volume 126 Issue 20
kansan.com
Wednesday, September 25, 2013
UDK
the student voice since 1904
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
KANSAS ROWING
COMPETING FORTHE COVER
PAGE 10
PAGE 3
All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2013 The University Daily Kansan
CLASSIFIEDS 9CROSSWORD 5CRYPTOQUIPS 5OPINION 4SPORTS 10SUDOKU 5
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IndexDon’tforgetToday’s Weather
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DUST ON DISPLAY
AGRICULTURE
Spencer Museum shows Dust Bowl art created by students
TOM QUINLAN
tquinlan@kansan.com 
YVONNE SAENZ/KANSAN
Kate Meyer, assistant curator of Works on Paper at the Spencer, speaks about the “1 Kansas Farmer” exhibition. The exhibition displays art about the Dust Bowl until Dec. 15.
Te Spencer Museum o Art isexhibiting six posters designedby students at the University. Teexhibit, "1 Kansas Farmer," illus-trates the scale o the Dust Bowl,current issues and uture chal-lenges Kansas agriculture willace. Te students applied designconcepts learned in class at theUniversity to create the exhibition.Te Dust Bowl was a period o severe drought and dust stormsduring the 1930s and was the larg-est agricultural disaster in Kansas’history. Te "1 Kansas Farmer"exhibit illustrates the scale o theDust Bowl, as well as challengesthat will aect armers in the u-ture. Te posters highlight the im-portance o agriculture in Kansas.Te exhibition is the result o a collaboration between Patrick Dooley, a proessor o visual com-munication at the University, andKate Meyer, assistant curator o Works on Paper at the Spencer.“Te posters are meant to inormin a way that is as engaging as pos-sible,” Meyer said. Te posters de-pict issues such as water conserva-tion, biouels and climate change.Meyers said that cooperationamong the scientic and armingcommunities is essential to solv-ing these challenges. “We havediscord, how do we move orwardwhen all o our parties aren’t on thesame page?” Meyers questioned.Te posters balance them-selves between elements o de-sign, science and art, accord-ing to the Spencer’s website.Te "1 Kansas Farmer" exhibi-tion coincides with the Universi-ty’s 2013 Common Book, imothy Egan’s “Te Worst Hard ime.” Te1 Kansas Farmer exhibition willbe at the Spencer through Dec. 15. 
— Edited by Chas Strobel 
199634%30%29%26%25%16%19%19%22%23%2000200420082012
Students in the lowest quartile of incomeStudents in the highest quartile of income
— source: ProPublica analysis of data from the U.S. Department of Education National Postsecondary Student Aid Study 
— GRAPHIC BY ALLYSON MATUREY
THE DECLINE IN GRANTS TO LOW-INCOME STUDENTS
Portion of institutional grants given to students in lowest and highest income quartiles
Financial aid provides better support for the wealthy 
CODY KUIPER
ckuiper@kansan.com 
“There’s a lot of hoops tojump through and a lot ofstuff you have to do to getthe aid.”
CARSON LEVINESenior
 
From those who nurse hang-overs well into the next day tothose who have a glass o winewith dinner, students vary widely in their drinking and drug habits.A new research study publishedin “Alcoholism: Clinical and Ex-perimental Research” sheds somenew light on the matter and oundthat it is the more intelligent stu-dents who are trying alcohol anddrugs at an earlier age and usingthem more requently.“Part o intelligence is the curios-ity component and experimenta-tion,” said Paula Fite, assistant pro-essor o clinical child psychology.Intelligent students may startexperimenting with drugs andalcohol because they are not chal-lenged by their environment, saidsophomore Jordan Ryerson romBlue Springs, Mo.“I had a couple riends in highschool who never had to study oranything, so they had all this extratime on their hands and chose todo drugs or drink instead o actu-ally preparing or classes,” Ryersonsaid.Smarter kids may be betterequipped to get their hands ondrugs and alcohol.Fite said that kids with high-er verbal skills at younger agesare associated with highersocioeconomic status.“So they have more money tobuy the substances. So it mightnot be actual ability, but the en- vironmental actors that also play into that, like money,” Fite said.And even though more intelli-gent students may start drinkingat an earlier age, the study oundthey are not more prone to addic-tion.“You want to be careul when yousay things like ‘more requently’because it’s not to a point o addic-tion,” Fite said. “It’s less impulsiveusing and more likely planned.Part o it is, [they] are probably better at making decisions.”Te research came as a surpriseto Mitchell Pruett, a junior romSalina in the honors program.“I eel like most college studentsdrink, but it seems a smaller per-centage o honors students drink than the general population actu-ally,” Pruett said.In act, the realities at the Uni- versity may not reect the re-search ndings.“I we are looking at college stu-dents, we are looking at a relatively bright population,” Fite said. “Weare not looking at the whole spec-trum o abilities so I think that it’sprobably hard to see too many di-erences and changes in already apretty homogenous group.
— Edited by Emma McElhaney 
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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2013PAGE 2CONTACT US
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Calendar
What:
Ten-year Anniversary Cele-bratio
When:
2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Where:
Ambler Student RecreationFitness Center
Cost:
Free
What:
International Peace andConfict Studies Film Festival
When:
Spencer Museum o Artauditorium
Where:
5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
About:
The Center o Latin Ameri-can & Caribbean Studies presents“Machuca” (2004). The lm runs or121 minutes.
Wednesday, Sept. 25Thursday, Sept. 26Friday, Sept. 27Saturday, Sept. 28
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eachers have started to moveaway rom multiple choice examsand towards alternative testingmethods, said Bruce Frey, Univer-sity associate proessor in psychol-ogy and research in education andthe author o “Modern ClassroomAssessment.” In the past, mosttests were given in traditional pa-per-and-pencil ormats, but many other methods have started to be-come more popular among teach-ers.Frey said one reason or this shiis that multiple choice tests don’tshow how students can apply class-room knowledge to an actual liesituation.“So many o the ways that wetest and assess students in class are very articial, and are things thatwe wouldn’t see outside o a class-room,” Frey said. “In real lie, whenpeople are evaluated on their skillsor perormance, it’s not going to beon a multiple choice test.”Tis issue can be addressed with“authentic assessments,” which isone alternative method o testingdiscussed in Frey’s book. Whilethere are many diferent denitionso authentic assessments, Frey saidthat they essentially test the stu-dent’s skills and abilities past basicclassroom knowledge.Tis could be done in many di-erent ways,depending onthe subjectarea. Studentscould write anessay, perorma task, create aproject or com-plete any otherassessmentthat reects their ability level.Frey said the problem with thisnew test strategy is that it tendsto be very subjective and requiresthe teacher to put a lot o thoughtinto airly testing every individualstudent. In addition, it also createsa challenge or the teacher — in-structors must gure out how tobest assign point values to non-tra-ditional testing measures.Because o this, a simple multiplechoice test with points awarded oreach correctly answered questionis oen times chosen over peror-mance-based assessments in orderto objectively assign a grade oreach student. While the studentshave less o a chance to show theirpersonal skills and abilities, multi-ple choice tests are optimal or test-ing a student’s basic knowledge andgrasp o a subject, said Frey.Another concept that Frey cov-ers in his book is the “ormativeassessment.” With this type o as-sessment, students are continually evaluated on their knowledge leveland what areas they do and do notunderstand. Tis evaluation mightcome in the orm o quizzes, dis-cussions or the student personally evaluating what they understand.While these checks may not alwaysbe valued toward the student’s nalgrade in the class, they allow boththe teacher and the student to seewhat concepts need to be claried."Tis idea o requently givingmeaningul eedback during thetime that learning is orming iswell-established as efective in in-creasing learning and test peror-mance,” Frey said. "It's the only typeo assessment that's been shown toincrease learning."Another one o the modern as-sessment techniques that Frey writes about in his book is the"universal test design," which is theidea to design assessments in a way that allows each individual studentto complete them and perormwell, despite diversity.“Te ways we teach and assessshould be useul and valuable orevery single student, no matter i they have a disability, regardless o what culture they come rom, orwhat their characteristics are,” Frey said.Frey adds that as teachers ndmore ways to create these types o universal assessments, more andmore students can complete themwithout being treated diferently rom any other student.However, instructors don’t needto choose between traditional test-ing methods and newer strategies.Lauren Dollar, a junior rom Nixa,Mo., said that a balance must ex-ist between completing hands-on,skill-based tasks and testing stu-dent understanding with a tradi-tional, paper-and-pencil method.“Tere’s no way to get aroundmultiple choice tests in order totest the students’ knowledge on theacts and theories that they learnedabout,” Dollar said. “As a teacher,in order to see where the studentis and how they’re progressing, youneed a comparison to see i they’reprogressing rom where they wereat the beginning.”Dollar recently applied to theSchool o Education and oundthat through school observations,she could make strong connectionsbetween what she read about in hertextbooks and how to realistically apply that knowledge when she’sinteracting with students.“You have to have the real-worldexperience, and you also have tocome back to the classroom andlearn why it works and how itworks,” Dollar said.
— Edited by Kayla Overbey 
New testing methods embrace student diversity 
KATIE MCBRIDE
kmcbride@kansan.com 
EDUCATION
What:
Facing Genocide and its Atermath:“Cartographies o the Holocaust and Genocide”
When:
3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Where:
Hall Center, Seminar Room
About:
Alberto Giordano, rom Texas State Uni-versity at San Marcos, will speak at a seminaropen to aculty, sta and graduate students.
What:
KU Common Book: An evening withauthor Timothy Egan
When:
7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
Where:
Lied Center
About:
In a ree event, Timothy Egan, author othe 2013-14 KU Common Book will speak abouthis experience writing “The Worst Hard Time,”as well as take questions rom the audience. Abook signing will ollow the event.
What:
Refecting Forward: Jazz Artists throughOral History
When:
10 a.m. to 11 a.m.
Where:
Watson Library, Room 455
About:
Coee and conversation with MaxineGordon. Part o American Studies’ celebrationo 60 years at the University.
What:
The Museum Collection Across theCurriculum: Lives o Buddhist Artiacts
When:
Noon to 1 p.m.
Where:
Spencer Museum o Art
About:
In this ree event, religious studiesproessor Daniel Stevenson discusses theways in which Buddhist images and objectsound their way into the lives o Buddhistclergy and institutions, ollowers o Buddhismand vernacular culture.
What:
Arican Beading
When:
All day
Where:
Spencer Museum o Art
About:
Beadwork activities representingArican and Native American cultures
What:
Fables on Global Warming
When:
7:30 p.m.
Where:
Lied Center o Perorming Arts
About:
Musical art perormance discussingsustainability through traditional animalables.
VICES
Study says smarter kids usedrugs, alcohol more often
YU KYUNG LEE
 ylee@kansan.com 
Bruce Frey 
“In real lie, when peopleare evaluated on theirskills or perormance, it’snot going to be on a multi-ple choice test.”
BRUCE FREYUniversity associate proessor
 
When Natalie Hays was a resh-man, she was tempted, like moststudents, by novelty ood optionslike slices o pizza smothered incream cheese and stued chickencheddar wraps. As a result, shegained the notorious “Freshman15.”She didn’t think she would pack on the pounds, but dorm ood,the stress o a new school, classesand parties distracted her rom ahealthy liestyle. Aer one year atthe University, Hays decided toreturn home to Overland Park tocontinue school at Johnson Coun-ty Community College. o getback on track, she hit the gym andplanned a disciplined diet.“Goals don’t happen in a blink o an eye, you need to have the pa-tience and the confdence knowingthat you CAN DO I!!!!” Hayswrote as her Facebook status onSept. 13.Now a junior at JCCC, Hays hasmanaged to shed over 20 pounds,lose six percent o her body at andregain her confdence. She is work-ing to motivate other ladies to notgive up on their bodies.“We need to be comortable inour own skin,” she said.In addition, Hays entered HER-LIFE Magazine’s ftness compe-tition earlier this month or thechance to be on the cover o theJanuary issue. Not only is thecompetition motivation to work out, but the magazine strives toempower women in all aspects o their lives.Currently, the magazine’s Face-book page displays photos o ap-proximately 40 women, includ-ing Hays, who are competing ortwelve spots to train with dierentitle Boxing Clubs. Te contes-tants will be chosen next monthbased on the highest number o photo likes. Aer eight weeks o training, the woman who loses themost body at will be the eaturedcover girl.“Why not enter i you have agood chance o winning?” saidHays. “But even i I don’t win, it’sOK.”So ar, the number o likes on thephotos ranges rom nine to 654,and Hays lies in between at 156.Voting ends Oct. 1.“[A magazine competition] is in-teresting because it’s just a dierentway o showing others how hardyou’ve worked and how you’rehappy with yoursel,” said Maken-zie Koehn, a sophomore studyinghuman biology. “It’s wanting todisplay that success so that othersmight be encouraged to take thesame step in a positive direction.”As i maintaining a strict ft-ness schedule doesn’t keep herbusy enough, Hays will grace thestage as a Miss Kansas USA pag-eant contestant in December. Asa proud Jayhawk, her title is “MissRock Chalk USA.Hays has been competing in pag-eants since 2004 but realized sheneeded to make changes when shecompared her Miss Kansas eenUSA pageant pictures rom her se-nior year in high school to thosetaken her reshman year at Kan-sas in 2011.Aer checking out a ew di-erent ftness programs, she took a new approach in March andbegan working with Derek Mc-Quinn, an independent trainerat Excel Wellness Studio in Over-land Park.“We train fve hours a week butultimately, she’s the one who putsin all the work,” said McQuinn.McQuinn said he hopes sheachieves her goals, but believesthat whether she wins competi-tions or not, her true lie story will help other girls understandthat there are healthy ways to loseweight.“I’m just mysel,” Hays said. “Idon’t want to be somebody else.”Even though she is content withher decision to move home, Hayssaid she misses the University. Apeople person at heart, Hays willapply to Kamsas’ nursing programaer JCCC to urther achieve hergoal to help other people.“Apparently, i you work out thenight beore a test or exam, it helpsyou relax,” Hays said. “I’ll have todo some more research about that.”
— Edited by Emma McElhaney 
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2013THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSANPAGE 3
POLICE REPORTS
Lenexa was once considered thespinach capital of the world. Theystill host a spinach festival eachyear. Now, there are at least twoother U.S. cities that make thesame claim.An 18-year-old female wasarrested yesterday on the300 block of Industrial Laneon suspicion of violatingcondition of parole. A $3,000bond was paid.A 41-year-old male wasarrested Monday on the 2300block of Alabama Street onsuspicion of domestic battery.No bond was posted.A 37-year-old female wasarrested Monday on the 2300block of Alabama Street onsuspicion of domestic battery.No bond was posted.A 35-year-old male wasarrested Monday on the 1700block of Maple Street onsuspicion of criminal restraint,criminal trespassing,intimidating a witness orvictim, domestic battery andcriminal damage to property. A$1,500 bond was paid.
Inormation based on theDouglas County Sheri’sOfce booking recap.
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SHAPE UP
Former student enters HERLIFE ftness competition 
AMELIA ARVESEN
aarvesen@kansan.com 
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
Natalie Hays, a former University student, is competing for a chance to be fea-tured on the cover of HERLIFE Magazine. She has been in pageants since 2004.
“We need to be comfort-able in our own skin.”
NATALIE HAYSFitness competitor
READING
Lawrence PublicLibrary celebratesbanned books
The Lawrence Public Library is en-couraging Douglas County residents toread books that have been banned orchallenged by people or organizations. Jeni Daley, Lawrence Public Librarymedia coordinator, said the library isparticipating with the American LibraryAssociation’s national Banned BookWeek from Sept. 22 to Sept. 28.The library called for residents tosend in artwork depicting a bannedbook. The artwork has the chance to befeatured in the Lawrence Arts Centerand turned into trading cards. Daleysaid the library received 99 art sub-missions, which was a large increasefrom last year’s 35 submissions.“We encourage people to come inand check out a banned book and grabtheir trading cards,” Daley said.Daley said most public librariesin the country participate with thenational book week, and the purposeis to celebrate intellectual freedom.The books that are featured were eitherbanned by institutions or challenged bypeople or groups.“They are just trying to spread aware-ness that people should choose whatthey want to read instead of beingcensored,” said Daley of the AmericanLibrary Association.Residents can get copies of thetrading cards at the Lawrence PublicLibrary, 700 New Hampshire St., orthe Lawrence Arts Center, 940 NewHampshire St., until Saturday.
— Dylan Lysen 
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