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Hofstede’s Power Distance and Organizational Culture

Hofstede’s Power Distance and Organizational Culture

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Published by Hugh Fox III
Gerry Johnson (1988) described a cultural web, identifying a number of elements that can be used to describe or influence organizational culture. The students will reflect on how Johnson’s factors and elements vary in a low power distance organization versus a high power distance organization and fill out the form table below.
1) The paradigm: What the organization is about, what it does, its mission, its values.
2) Control systems: The processes in place to monitor what is going on. Role cultures would have vast rulebooks. There would be more reliance on individualism in a power culture.
3) Organizational structures: Reporting lines, hierarchies, and the way that work flows through the business.
4) Power structures: Who makes the decisions, how widely spread is power, and on what is power based?
5) Symbols: These include organizational logos and designs, but also extend to symbols of power such as parking spaces and executive washrooms.
6) Rituals and routines: Management meetings, board reports and so on may become more habitual than necessary.
7) Stories and myths: build up about people and events, and convey a message about what is valued within the organization.

Hofstede, Geert (1991), Cultures and Organizations: Software of the Mind., McGraw-Hill Professional

Johnson, Gerry (1988) "Rethinking Incrementalism", Strategic Management Journal Vol 9 pp. 75–91
Gerry Johnson (1988) described a cultural web, identifying a number of elements that can be used to describe or influence organizational culture. The students will reflect on how Johnson’s factors and elements vary in a low power distance organization versus a high power distance organization and fill out the form table below.
1) The paradigm: What the organization is about, what it does, its mission, its values.
2) Control systems: The processes in place to monitor what is going on. Role cultures would have vast rulebooks. There would be more reliance on individualism in a power culture.
3) Organizational structures: Reporting lines, hierarchies, and the way that work flows through the business.
4) Power structures: Who makes the decisions, how widely spread is power, and on what is power based?
5) Symbols: These include organizational logos and designs, but also extend to symbols of power such as parking spaces and executive washrooms.
6) Rituals and routines: Management meetings, board reports and so on may become more habitual than necessary.
7) Stories and myths: build up about people and events, and convey a message about what is valued within the organization.

Hofstede, Geert (1991), Cultures and Organizations: Software of the Mind., McGraw-Hill Professional

Johnson, Gerry (1988) "Rethinking Incrementalism", Strategic Management Journal Vol 9 pp. 75–91

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Published by: Hugh Fox III on Sep 28, 2013
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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10/19/2013

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